Bio-X


Showing 1-100 of 795 Results

  • Ronald W. Davis

    Ronald W. Davis

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Human to conduct whole genome analysis projects. The yeast genome sequence has approximately 6,000 genes. We have made a set of haploid and diploid strains (21,000) containing a complete deletion of each gene. In order to facilitate whole genome analysis each deletion is molecularly tagged with a unique 20-mer DNA sequence. This sequence acts as a molecular bar code and makes it easy to identify the presence of each deletion.

  • Christos E. Constantinou

    Christos E. Constantinou

    Associate Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main recent interest is the application of Biomedical Engineering approaches for the clinical visualization and characterization of the static and dynamic properties of pelvic floor function. This extends to ultrasound Imaging and image processing, construction of computer models and biomechanics analysis of pelvic floor function. It is envisioned that these considerations are important constituents of the clinical evaluation of patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction and urodynamics.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Peter K.  Jackson

    Peter K.  Jackson

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCell cycle and cyclin control of DNA replication .

  • Douglas Vollrath

    Douglas Vollrath

    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Vollrath lab works to uncover molecular mechanisms relevant to the health and pathology of the outer retina. We study the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cell monolayer adjacent to photoreceptors that performs a variety of tasks crucial for retinal homeostasis. Specific areas of interest include the circadian regulation of RPE phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segment tips, and how RPE metabolic dysfunction contributes to retinal degenerative diseases.

  • Trevor Hastie

    Trevor Hastie

    John A. Overdeck Professor, Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFlexible statistical modelling, datamining, bioinformatics, and statistical computing.

  • Stephen Quake

    Stephen Quake

    Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle molecule biophysics, precision force measurement, micro and nano fabrication with soft materials, integrated microfluidics and large scale biological automation.

  • Brian Hargreaves

    Brian Hargreaves

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications including cardiovascular, abdominal, breast and musculoskeletal imaging. These applications require development of faster and more efficient MRI methods that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. My work includes novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods and reconstruction tools. Please see my research site (above) for most up-to-date information.

  • Geoffrey Gurtner

    Geoffrey Gurtner

    Johnson & Johnson Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeoffrey Gurtner's Lab is interested in understanding the mecahnism of new blood vessel growth following injury and how pathways of tissue regeneration and fibrosis interact in wound healing.

  • Ron Fedkiw

    Ron Fedkiw

    Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioFedkiw's research is focused on the design of new computational algorithms for a variety of applications including computational fluid dynamics, computer graphics, and biomechanics.

  • Nicholas Melosh

    Nicholas Melosh

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science

    BioMelosh's research is focused on developing methods to detect and control chemical processes on the nanoscale, to create materials that are responsive to their local environment. The research goal incorporates many of the hallmarks of biological adaptability, based on feedback control between cellular receptors and protein expression. Similar artificial networks may be achieved by fabricating arrays of nanoscale devices that can detect and influence their local surroundings through ionic potential, temperature, mechanical motion, capacitance, or electrochemistry. These devices are particularly suited as smart biomaterials, where multiple surface-cell interactions must be monitored and adjusted simultaneously for optimal cell adhesion and growth. Other interests include precise control over self-assembled materials, and potential methods to monitor the diagnostics of complicated chemical systems, such as the effect of drug treatments within patients.

    Research Interests:
    Molecular materials at interfaces
    Directed dynamic self-assembly
    Controlling molecular or biomolecular assembly and behavior
    Influence of local electronic, optical or thermal stimuli

  • Denise M. Monack

    Denise M. Monack

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe primary focus of my research is to understand the genetic and molecular mechanisms of intracellular bacterial pathogenesis. We use several model systems to study complex host-pathogen interactions in the gut and in immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells. Ultimately we would like to understand how Salmonella persists within certain hosts for years in the face of a robust immune response.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformation transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Nidhi Bhutani

    Nidhi Bhutani

    Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of our research is to understand the fundamental mechanisms that govern and reprogram cellular fate during development, regeneration and disease.

  • Rhiju Das

    Rhiju Das

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab seeks an agile and predictive understanding of how nucleic acids and proteins code for information processing in living systems. We develop new computational & chemical tools to enable the precise modeling, regulation, and design of RNA and RNA/protein machines.

  • Fei-Fei Li

    Fei-Fei Li

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman vision, high-level visual recognition, computational neuroscience

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. My group works on a variety of organisms and model systems ranging from humans and other primates to domesticated plant and animals. Much of our research is at the interface of computational biology, mathematical genetics, and evolutionary genomics.

  • Sharon Pitteri

    Sharon Pitteri

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Pitteri laboratory is focused on the discovery and validation of proteins that can be used as molecular indicators of risk, diagnosis, progression, and recurrence of cancer. Proteomic technologies, predominantly mass spectrometry, are used to identify proteins in the blood that are differentially regulated and/or post-translationally modified with disease state. Using human plasma samples, tumor tissue, cancer cell lines, and genetically engineered mouse models, the origins of these proteins are being investigated. A major goal of this research is to define novel molecular signatures for breast and ovarian cancers, including particular sub-types of these diseases. This laboratory is also focused on the identification of proteins with expression restricted to the surface of cancer cells which can be used as novel targets for molecular imaging technologies.

  • Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioI am a brain tumor neurosurgeon, treating patients with malignant and benign tumors, including glioma, brain metastases, meningioma, vestibular schwannoma, and pituitary adenomas. Our lab seeks greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and disease progression in malignant brain tumors. We currently study the capacity of cellular and cell-free DNA to inform treatment choices in patients with brain tumors. We also use single cell and cell subtype-specific transcriptomics to identify and target infiltrating glioblastoma. We hope to identify potentially targetable genes crucial in tumorigenesis. Our laboratory is a unique and collaborative working environment, engaged in a dynamic research environment at Stanford. Our laboratory space lies at the heart of the Stanford campus between the core campus and the medical facilities, emblematic of the translational aspects of our work.

    www.gephartlab.com
    www.GBMseq.org

  • Joseph Garner

    Joseph Garner

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe medical research community has long recognized that “good well-being is good science”. The lab uses an integrated interdisciplinary approach to explore this interface, while providing tangible deliverables for the well-being of human patients and research animals.

  • Aaron D. Gitler

    Aaron D. Gitler

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms of human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and ALS. We don't limit ourselves to one model system or experimental approach. We start with yeast, perform genetic and chemical screens, and then move to other model systems (e.g. mammalian tissue culture, mouse, fly) and even work with human patient samples (tissue sections, patient-derived cells, including iPS cells) and next generation sequencing approaches.

  • Michael Bassik

    Michael Bassik

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in the mechanism by which bacterial toxins, viruses, and protein aggregates hijack the secretory pathway and kill cells. More broadly, we investigate how diverse stresses (biological, chemical) signal to the apoptotic machinery.

    To pursue these interests, we develop widely applicable new technologies to screen and measure genetic interactions; these include high-complexity shRNA libraries, which have allowed the first systematic genetic interaction maps in mammalian cells.

  • Scott Dixon

    Scott Dixon

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is interested in the relationship between cell death and metabolism. Using techniques drawn from many disciplines my laboratory is investigating how perturbation of intracellular metabolic networks can result in novel forms of cell death, such as ferroptosis. We are interested in applying this knowledge to find new ways to treat diseases characterized by insufficient (e.g. cancer) or excessive (e.g. neurodegeneration) cell death.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on two main areas: using microfluidic tools we have already developed to build ground-up quantitative models of how gene expression is regulated, and developing new tools to explore protein-protein interactions.

  • Justin Gardner

    Justin Gardner

    Assistant Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow does neural activity in the human cortex create our sense of visual perception? We use a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, computational modeling and analysis, and psychophysical measurements to link human perception to cortical brain activity.

  • Nicholas T. Ouellette

    Nicholas T. Ouellette

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Environmental Complexity Lab studies self-organization in a variety of complex systems, ranging from turbulent fluid flows to granular materials to collective motion in animal groups. In all cases, we aim to characterize the macroscopic behavior, understand its origin in the microscopic dynamics, and ultimately harness it for engineering applications. Most of our projects are experimental, though we also use numerical simulation and mathematical modeling when appropriate. We specialize in high-speed, detailed imaging and statistical analysis.

    Our current research includes studies of turbulence in two and three dimensions, with a focus on coherent structures and the geometry of turbulence; the transport of inertial, anisotropic, and active particles in turbulence; the erosion of granular beds by fluid flows and subsequent sediment transport; quantitative measurements of collective behavior in insect swarms and bird flocks; the stability of ocean ecosystems; neural signal processing; and uncovering the natural, self-organized spatiotemporal scales in urban systems.

  • Tanya Stoyanova

    Tanya Stoyanova

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on understanding fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development. Currently, we study signaling cascades initiated by cell surface receptors which are involved in: 1) the early event of prostate cancer initiation and 2) regulation of the transition from indolent to metastatic disease. The long term goal of our laboratory is to improve the stratification of indolent from aggressive prostate cancer and aid the development of better therapeutic strategies for the advanced disease.

    Additionally, we are interested in understanding molecular mechanism that govern the self-renewal activity of adult stem cells and cancer stem cells. We use molecular biology techniques, cell culture based adult stem cell assays, in vivo tissue regeneration models of cancer.

  • Nirao Shah

    Nirao Shah

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how our brains generate social interactions that differ between the sexes. Such gender differences in behavior are regulated by sex hormones, experience, and social cues. Accordingly, we are characterizing how these internal and external factors control gene expression and neuronal physiology in the two sexes to generate behavior. We are also interested in understanding how such sex differences in the healthy brain translate to sex differences in many neuro-psychiatric illnesses.

  • Alistair Boettiger

    Alistair Boettiger

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab focuses on investigating the role of three-dimensional genome organization in regulating gene expression and in shaping cell fate specification during development. We pursue this with advanced single-molecule imaging and transgenics.

  • Aijaz Ahmed, MD

    Aijaz Ahmed, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioMy research interests include nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and viral hepatitis. I have focused my research to database analysis/outcomes and translational research in these areas. While database analysis has been critical in outlining trends in NAFLD and viral hepatitis epidemiology, translational research has provided insight into disease mechanism and future therapies. I collaborate with several basic science colleagues and act as clinical mentor for young investigators involved in translational research. I am also interested and act as adjunct faculty in biodesign and health policy. I have participated in several clinical trials as a co-investigator.

  • Alex Aiken

    Alex Aiken

    Alcatel-Lucent Professor in Communications and Networking and Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics and of Photon Science

    BioAiken's research focuses on developing techniques for the construction of reliable software systems. His interests include both static and dynamic methods of analyzing programs, and span both detecting errors and verifying the absence of errors in software. Most of his research combines a theoretical component (for example, proving the soundness of an analysis technique) and a practical component, which often involves the implementation and measurement of advanced program analysis algorithms. Finally, his research also extends to the design of new programming languages and programming techniques in which it is easier to write software that can be checked for a wide variety of errors.

  • Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on attaining a better understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and progression of tumors, and their response to current therapies toward improving future treatment strategies. In this effort, I employ tools from functional genomics, computational biology, molecular genetics, and mouse models.

    Clinically, I specialize in the care of patients with lymphomas, working on translating our findings in prospective cancer clinical trials.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Katrin Andreasson

    Katrin Andreasson

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the investigation of the brain’s innate immune response, and the role that maladaptive microglial activity plays in initiation and progression of neurological disease.

  • Jason Andrews

    Jason Andrews

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory aims to develop and test innovative approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and control of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. We draw upon multiple fields including mathematical modeling, microbial genetics, field epidemiology, statistical inference and biodesign to work on challenging problems in infectious diseases, with an emphasis on tuberculosis and tropical diseases.

  • Thomas P. Andriacchi

    Thomas P. Andriacchi

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Orthopaedic Surgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Andriacchi's research focuses on the biomechanics of human locomotion and applications to medical devices, sports injury, osteoarthritis, the anterior cruciate ligament and low cost prosthetic limbs

  • Martin S. Angst

    Martin S. Angst

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory's current transformative research efforts focus on studying immune health in the context of surgery and anesthesia.

  • Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe ANNES LABORATORY of Molecular Endocrinology: Leveraging Chemical Biology to Treat Endocrine Disorders

    DIABETES
    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing at a staggering rate. By the year 2050 an astounding 25% of Americans will be diabetic. The goal of my research is to uncover therapeutic strategies to stymie the ensuing diabetes epidemic. To achieve this goal we have developed a variety of innovate experimental approaches to uncover novel approaches to curing diabetes.

    (1) Beta-Cell Regeneration: Diabetes results from either an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin production. Our therapeutic strategy is to stimulate the regeneration of insulin-producing beta-cells to enhance an individual’s insulin secretion capacity. We have developed a unique high-throughput chemical screening platform which we use to identify small molecules that promote beta-cell growth. This work has led to the identification of key molecular pathways (therapeutic targets) and candidate drugs that promote the growth and regeneration of islet beta-cells. Our goal is to utilize these discoveries to treat and prevent diabetes.

    (2) The Metabolic Syndrome: A major cause of the diabetes epidemic is the rise in obesity which leads to a cluster of diabetes- and cardiovascular disease-related metabolic abnormalities that shorten life expectancy. These physiologic aberrations are collectively termed the Metabolic Syndrome (MS). My laboratory has developed an original in vivo screening platform t to identify novel hormones that influence the behaviors (excess caloric consumption, deficient exercise and disrupted sleep-wake cycles) and the metabolic abnormalities caused by obesity. We aim to manipulate these hormone levels to prevent the development and detrimental consequences of the MS.

    HEREDIATY PARAGAGLIOMA SYNDROME
    The Hereditary Paraganglioma Syndrome (hPGL) is a rare genetic cancer syndrome that is most commonly caused by a defect in mitochondrial metabolism. Our goal is to understand how altered cellular metabolism leads to the development of cancer. Although hPGL is uncommon, it serves as an excellent model for the abnormal metabolic behavior displayed by nearly all cancers. Our goal is to develop novel therapeutic strategies that target the abnormal behavior of cancer cells. In the laboratory we have developed hPGL mouse models and use high throughput chemical screening to identify the therapeutic susceptibilities that result from the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells.

    As a physician scientist trained in clinical genetics I have developed expertise in hereditary endocrine disorders and devoted my efforts to treating families affected by the hPGL syndrome. By leveraging our laboratory expertise in the hPGL syndrome, our care for individuals who have inherited the hPGL syndrome is at the forefront of medicine. Our goal is to translate our laboratory discoveries to the treatment of affected families.

  • Eric Andrew Appel

    Eric Andrew Appel

    Assistant Professor of Material Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe underlying theme of the Appel Lab at Stanford University integrates concepts and approaches from supramolecular chemistry, natural/synthetic materials, and biology. We aim to develop supramolecular biomaterials that exploit a diverse design toolbox and take advantage of the beautiful synergism between physical properties, aesthetics, and low energy consumption typical of natural systems. Our vision is to use these materials to solve fundamental biological questions and to engineer advanced healthcare solutions.

  • Amin Arbabian

    Amin Arbabian

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur work covers circuit/system design in three general areas of 1) mm-Wave and THz, 2) Biomedical, and 3) Ultra-Low Power Electronic sensors.

  • Ronald L. Ariagno

    Ronald L. Ariagno

    Professor (Clinical) of Pediatrics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopmental Physiology and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Research Laboratory closed in 2008.

    Current effort, as Chair of Task Force and neonatal consult at the FDA, is to establish through consensus a culture of investigation and collaboration for all clinical neonatology practices: academic, corporate and community based to maximize the opportunity to participate in research effort needed for the regulatory approval of neonatal therapeutics to improve the outcome of critically ill infants.

  • Kevin Arrigo

    Kevin Arrigo

    Donald and Donald M. Steel Professor in Earth Sciences and Director, Earth Systems Program

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInvestigates role of ocean biology in gobal carbon and nutrient cycles.

  • Steven Artandi

    Steven Artandi

    Jerome and Daisy Low Gilbert Professor and Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTelomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect chromosome ends and shorten with cell division and aging. We are interested in how telomere shortening influences cancer, stem cell function, aging and human disease. Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that synthesizes telomere repeats and is expressed in stem cells and in cancer. We have found that telomerase also regulates stem cells and we are pursuing the function of telomerase through diverse genetic and biochemical approaches.

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Vice Provost and Dean of Research, Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. We also use network approaches to characterize biology. The wet bench is where we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality of our favorite targets.

  • Scott W. Atlas

    Scott W. Atlas

    Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Atlas's investigates the impact of government and the private sector on access, quality, and pricing in health care, both within the US and globally, and the effects of government policies and the changing marketplace on technology-based innovations in medicine. His medical research has centered on advanced applications of new MRI technologies and the key economic issues related to the future of such technology-based advances.

  • Laura Attardi

    Laura Attardi

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Biology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is aimed at defining the pathways of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression, using a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and mouse genetic approaches. Our strategy is to start by generating hypotheses about p53 mechanisms of action using primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), and then to test them using gene targeting technology in the mouse.

  • Jeffrey Axelrod

    Jeffrey Axelrod

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenetic and cell biological analyses of signals controlling cell polarity and morphogenesis. Frizzled signaling and cytoskeletal organization.

  • Rosa Bacchetta

    Rosa Bacchetta

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn the coming years, I plan to further determine the genetic and immunological basis of diseases with autoimmunity or immune dysregulation in children. I believe that much can still be learned from the in depth mechanistic studies of pediatric autoimmune diseases. Genomic analysis of the patients' samples has become possible which may provide a rapid indication of altered target molecules. I plan to implement robust functional studies to define the consequences of these genetic abnormalities and bridge them to the patient's clinical phenotype.

    Understanding functional consequences of gene mutations in single case/family first and then validating the molecular and cellular defects in other patients with similar phenotypes, will anticipate and complement cellular and gene therapy strategies.

    For further information please visit the Bacchetta Lab website:
    http://med.stanford.edu/bacchettalab.html

  • Stephen A. Baccus

    Stephen A. Baccus

    Associate Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how the neural circuitry of the vertebrate retina encodes visual information and performs computations. To control and measure the retinal circuit, we present visual images while performing simultaneous two-photon imaging and multielectrode recording. We perturb the circuit as it operates using simultaneous intracellular current injection and multielectrode recording, and use the resulting large data sets to construct models of retinal computation.

  • Julie Baker

    Julie Baker

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is focused on identifying proteins based upon their ability to alter a variety of cell fate decisions - including mesodermal, endodermal, neural, endothelial, and somitic - within the vertebrate embryo.

  • Nicholas Bambos

    Nicholas Bambos

    Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioNick Bambos is a Professor at Stanford University, having a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Management Science & Engineering. He heads the Network Architecture and Performance Engineering research group at Stanford, conducting research in wireless network architectures, the Internet infrastructure, packet switching, network management and information service engineering, engaged in various projects of his Network Architecture Laboratory (NetLab). His current technology research interests include high-performance networking, autonomic computing, and service engineering. His methodological interests are in network control, online task scheduling, queueing systems and stochastic processing networks.

    He has graduated over 20 Ph.D. students, who are now at leadership positions in academia (Stanford, CalTech, Michigan, GaTech, NYU, UBC, etc.) and the information technology industry (Cisco, Broadcom, IBM Labs, Qualcomm, Nokia, MITRE, Sun Labs, ST Micro, Intel, Samsung, TI, etc.) or have become successful entrepreneurs. From 1999 to 2005 he served as the director of the Stanford Networking Research Center, a major partnership/consortium between Stanford and information technology industries, involving tens of corporate members, faculty and doctoral students. He is now heading a new research initiative at Stanford on Networked Information Service Engineering.

    He is on the Editorial Boards of several research journals and serves on various international technical committees and review panels for networking research and information technologies. He has been serving on the boards of various start-up companies in the Silicon Valley, consults on high technology development and management matters, and has served as lead expert witness in high-profile patent litigation cases in networking and computing.

  • Niaz Banaei

    Niaz Banaei

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis research interests include (1) development, assessment, and improvement of novel infectious diseases diagnostics, (2) enhancing the quality of C. difficile diagnostic results, and (3) characterization of M. tuberculosis virulence determinants.

  • Zhenan Bao

    Zhenan Bao

    K. K. Lee Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry

    BioZhenan Bao joined Stanford University in 2004. She is currently a K.K. Lee Professor in Chemical Engineering, and with courtesy appointments in Chemistry and Material Science and Engineering. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Inventors. She founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR) and is the current faculty director. She is also an affiliated faculty member of Precourt Institute, Woods Institute, ChEM-H and Bio-X. Professor Bao received her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from The University of Chicago in 1995 and joined the Materials Research Department of Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. She became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2001. Professor Bao currently has more than 400 refereed publications and more than 60 US patents. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She was an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Polymer Reviews and Synthetic Metals. She serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, ACS Nano, Accounts of Chemical Reviews, Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials, Chemical Communications, Journal of American Chemical Society, Nature Asian Materials, Materials Horizon and Materials Today. She is one of the Founders and currently sits on the Board of Directors of C3 Nano Co., a silicon valley venture funded company. She is Fellow of AAAS, ACS, MRS, SPIE, ACS POLY and ACS PMSE. She was a recipient of the L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award in 2017. She was awarded the ACS Applied Polymer Science Award in 2017, ACS Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013 ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011, and was selected by Phoenix TV, China as 2010 Most influential Chinese in the World-Science and Technology Category. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine Editors Choice Best of the Best new technology for 2001. She has been selected in 2002 by the American Chemical Society Women Chemists Committee as one of the twelve Outstanding Young Woman Scientist who is expected to make a substantial impact in chemistry during this century. She is also selected by MIT Technology Review magazine in 2003 as one of the top 100 young innovators for this century. She has been selected as one of the recipients of Stanford Terman Fellow and has been appointed as the Robert Noyce Faculty Scholar, Finmeccanica Faculty Scholar and David Filo and Jerry Yang Faculty Scholar.

  • Maria Barna

    Maria Barna

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies how intricate control of gene expression and cell signaling is regulated on a minute-by-minute basis to give rise to the remarkable diversity of cell types and tissue morphology that form the living blueprints of developing organisms. Work in the Barna lab is presently split into two main research efforts. The first is investigating ribosome-mediated control of gene expression genome-wide in space and time during cellular differentiation and organismal development. This research is opening a new field of study in which we apply sophisticated mass spectrometry, computational biology, genomics, and developmental genetics, to characterize a ribosome code to gene expression. Our research has shown that not all of the millions of ribosomes within a cell are the same and that ribosome heterogeneity can diversify how genomes are translated into proteomes. In particular, we seek to address whether fundamental aspects of gene regulation are controlled by ribosomes harboring a unique activity or composition that are tuned to translating specific transcripts by virtue of RNA regulatory elements embedded within their 5’UTRs. The second research effort is centered on employing state-of-the-art live cell imaging to visualize cell signaling and cellular control of organogenesis. This research has led to the realization of a novel means of cell-cell communication dependent on a dense network of actin-based cellular extension within developing organs that interconnect and facilitate the precise transmission of molecular information between cells. We apply and create bioengineering tools to manipulate such cellular interactions and signaling in-vivo.

  • Ben Barres

    Ben Barres

    Professor of Neurobiology, of Developmental Biology, of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab is interested in the neuronal-glial interactions that underlie the development and function of the mammlian central nervous system.

  • Annelise E. Barron

    Annelise E. Barron

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiophysical mechanisms of host defense peptides (a.k.a. antimicrobial peptides) and mimics; also, molecular and cellular biophysics of human innate immune responses.

  • Greg Barsh

    Greg Barsh

    Professor of Genetics and of Pediatrics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenetics of color variation

  • Sanjay Basu

    Sanjay Basu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Outcomes Research) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmathematical models
    operations research
    primary care
    public health
    econometrics
    global health
    social determinants of health
    health policy
    health disparities

  • Mohsen Bayati

    Mohsen Bayati

    Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research areas of interest include:

    1) Probabilistic and statistical models for decision making with large-scale and complex data (and applications in healthcare).

    2) Graphical models and message-passing algorithms.

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunction of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplications of computer graphics to medical imaging, with emphasis on diagnosis of bowel pathology using virtual colonoscopy. Dynamic joint imaging with open Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

  • Barry Behr, Ph.D., H.C.L.D.

    Barry Behr, Ph.D., H.C.L.D.

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment of improved embryo culture conditions in vitro. Blastocyst cultures. Embryo metabolism in vitro. Embryo maternal dialogue. Clinical application and integration of extended embryo culture systems. Monozygotic twinning. Prevention of multiple pregnancy. Sperm motility enhancers. Fluorescent and non-fluorescent markers of sperm morphology and viablility. Oocyte cryopreservation. Fertility preservation. Improving IVF outcome.

  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Associate Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science and of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bejerano, co-discoverer of ultraconserved elements, studies the Human Genome. His research focuses on genome sequence and function in both humans and related primate, mammalian and vertebrate species. He is deeply interested in mapping both coding and non-coding genome sequence variation to phenotype differences, and in extracting specific genetic insights from high throughput sequencing measurements, in the contexts of development and developmental abnormalities.

  • Sean Bendall

    Sean Bendall

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to understand the mechanisms regulating the development of human systems. Drawing on both pluripotent stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and immunology, combined with novel high-content single-cell analysis (CyTOF – Mass Cytometry) and imagining (MIBI-Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging) we are creating templates of ‘normal’ human cellular behavior to both discover novel regulatory events and cell populations as well as understand dysfunctional processes such as cancer.

  • Stacey Bent

    Stacey Bent

    Jagdeep and Roshni Singh Professor in the School of Engineering, Senior Associate Dean for Faculty & Academic Affairs, Senior Fellow at Precourt and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science & Eng, of Electrical Eng and of Chemistry

    BioThe research in the Bent laboratory is focused on understanding and controlling surface and interfacial chemistry and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in semiconductor processing, micro- and nano-electronics, nanotechnology, and sustainable and renewable energy. Much of the research aims to develop a molecular-level understanding in these systems, and hence the group uses of a variety of molecular probes. Systems currently under study in the group include functionalization of semiconductor surfaces, mechanisms and control of atomic layer deposition, molecular layer deposition, nanoscale materials for light absorption, interface engineering in photovoltaics, catalyst and electrocatalyst deposition.

  • Jonathan Berger

    Jonathan Berger

    Denning Family Provostial Professor

    BioJonathan Berger is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford University, where he teaches composition, music theory, and cognition at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He was the founding co-director of the Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SICA, now the Stanford Arts Institute) and founding director of Yale University’s Center for Studies in Music Technology

  • Dominique Bergmann

    Dominique Bergmann

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetic, genomic and cell biological approaches to study cell fate acquisition, focusing on cases where cell fate is correlated with asymmetric cell division.

  • Rebecca Bernert

    Rebecca Bernert

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Bernert is Director of the Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory within the Stanford Mood Disorders Center. She is a suicidologist, with subspecialty expertise in suicide prevention clinical trials and evidence-based standardized suicide risk assessment and best practice management. She has subspecialty training in behavioral sleep medicine, with a background in sleep and circadian physiology. Her program utilizes cognitive, biologic (e.g., fMRI), and behavioral testing paradigms, with an emphasis on translational therapeutics. Dr. Bernert has collaborated with NIH, DOD, DARPA, SAMHSA, and the White House on suicide prevention initiatives; and recently contributed to the 2014 VACO Mental Health Innovations for Suicide Prevention Workgroup and the 2013 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) for the Assessment and Management of Patients at Risk for Suicide. Her research focuses on the development of novel therapeutic targets for suicide prevention across the lifespan, particularly those aiming to reduce stigma and enhance access to care. A specific focus of this work emphasizes the use of low-risk intervention approaches for the prevention of suicide. Dr. Bernert has several suicide prevention trials currently underway, funded by NIH and DOD, testing the preliminary efficacy of a non pharmacological insomnia treatment on suicidal behaviors. Within this framework, we are interested in the investigation of transdiagnostic risk factors and candidate biomarkers that may inform the pathogenesis of risk and treatment innovation. Advisory and advocacy work, focused on the way in which such research guides public health policy, dissemination, and national strategies for suicide prevention, has been an extension of this work. Most recently, this includes local initiatives to establish guidelines for lethal means restriction advocacy and implementation on a broad scale.

  • Daniel Bernstein

    Daniel Bernstein

    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel Smith Salter Endowed Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Role of the G protein coupled receptors in regulating mitochondrial structure and function.
    2. Differences between R and L ventricular responses to stress, including gene expression and miR regulation.
    3. Using iPSC-derived myocytes to understand heart failure and congenital heart disease.
    4. Tools for evaluation of cardiac physiology in transgenic mice and isolated cardiomyocytes.
    5. Anti-body mediated rejection.
    6. Biomarkers for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Jon Bernstein

    Jon Bernstein

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include the genetics of autism and other developmental disorders. In collaboration with colleagues at Stanford, I am working to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of genetic disorders associated with developmental disability. I am also engaged in the application of new technologies (Whole genome sequencing, Multi-omics profiling) for the diagnosis of developmental disorders.

  • Michael Bernstein

    Michael Bernstein

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioMichael Bernstein combines computation with crowds, creating systems that enable people to connect and coordinate online. His research focuses on the design of crowdsourcing and social computing systems.

  • William Berquist

    William Berquist

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastroenterology, gastointestinal motility, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmolecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    BioProfessor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, and the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, among many others. Her efforts in undergraduate education have earned the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

    Today, the Bertozzi Group at Stanford studies the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. The work has advanced understanding of cell surface oligosaccharides involved in cell recognition and inter-cellular communication.

    Dr. Bertozzi's lab also develops new methods to perform controlled chemical reactions within living systems. The group has developed new tools for studying glycans in living systems, and more recently nanotechnologies for probing biological systems. Such "bioorthoganol" chemistries enable manipulation of biomolecules in their living environment.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi founded Redwood Bioscience of Emeryville, California, and has served on the research advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline.

  • Vivek Bhalla, MD, FASN, FAHA

    Vivek Bhalla, MD, FASN, FAHA

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bhalla's two primary research interests are in the interaction of the kidney in diabetes and hypertension. We use molecular, biochemical, and transgenic approaches to study mechanisms of physiologic and aberrant ion handling and its implications for hypertension in obesity and insulin resistance. We also study mechanisms of susceptibility to diabetic kidney disease including the role of the endothelium to regulate inflammation and kidney injury.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Lacramioara Bintu

    Lacramioara Bintu

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

    BioLacra Bintu is an Assistant Professor in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford. Her lab performs single-cell measurements of chromatin and gene regulation dynamics, and uses these data to develop predictive models of basic biological processes and improve mammalian cell engineering.

    Lacra started working on the theory of gene regulation as an undergraduate with Jané Kondev from Brandeis University and Rob Phillips from Caltech. As a Physics PhD student in the lab of Carlos Bustamante at U.C. Berkeley, she used single-molecule methods to tease apart the molecular mechanisms of transcription through nucleosomes. She transitioned to studying the dynamics of epigenetic regulation in live cells during her postdoctoral fellowship with Michael Elowitz at Caltech. She started her own interdisciplinary lab at Stanford in January 2017.

  • Julius Bishop, MD

    Julius Bishop, MD

    Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bishop specializes in treating fractures of the upper extremity, lower extremity, pelvis and acetabulum as well as the management of post-traumatic problems including malunion, nonunion and infection.

    He received his undergraduate and medical school degrees from Harvard University and went on to complete the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program. He pursued his subspecialty training in Orthopaedic Traumatology at the world-renowned Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington.

    His research interests include applying decision analysis models to orthopaedic trauma problems, studying clinical outcomes after musculoskeletal injury, orthopaedic biomechanics, the basic science of fracture healing, and evaluating new strategies and techniques in fracture surgery.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor and Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Catherine Blish

    Catherine Blish

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major goal of our research is to gain insight into the prevention and control of HIV and other viral pathogens by studying the interplay between the virus and the host immune response. We investigate the role of various arms of the immune response, but with a particular focus on NK cells. We hope to gain additional insights into control of infectious diseases by studying how pregnancy modulates immune responses.

  • Steven M. Block

    Steven M. Block

    The Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D., Professor and Professor of Applied Physics and of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle molecule biophysics using optical trapping and fluorescence

  • Mark S. Blumenkranz, MD

    Mark S. Blumenkranz, MD

    H. J. Smead Professor of Ophthalmology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interest and Research
    My primary areas of interest are in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of vitreal retinal diseases. These principally include age-related macular degeneration and other diseases of the macula, and tractional syndromes, diabetic retinopathy, and complex forms of retinal detachment. I have been interested in the development of novel technology to diagnose and treat these diseases, including new forms of imaging, laser delivery systems, other microsurgical tools, and new drugs and drug delivery systems that inhibit new blood vessel growth, scarring and intraocular inflammation. I have been actively involved in translational research in the laboratory as well as technology transfer associated with that research for a variety of new therapies that have received FDA clearance and been introduced into clinical practice over the past 30 years.

    Administrative and Community Service
    I have served on the Board of Directors of a variety of voluntary education and service organizations, including the Corporation of Brown University, multiple scientific advisory boards and various philanthropic and research organizations.

  • Kwabena Boahen

    Kwabena Boahen

    Professor of Bioengineering and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLarge-scale models of sensory, perceptual and motor systems

  • Alexandria Boehm

    Alexandria Boehm

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMy primary research area is coastal water quality, and recently I have expanded my research to include activities on sanitation more broadly. The work on coastal water quality is focused on understanding the sources, transformation, transport, and ecology of biocolloids - specifically fecal indicator organisms, pathogens, and phytoplankton, as well as sources and fate of nitrogen and phosphorus. This knowledge is crucial to directing new policies, and management and engineering practices that protect human and ecosystem health along the coastal margin. The work on sanitation aims to develop microbial risk assessment models to gain a better understanding of how pathogens are transmitted to humans through their contact with water, feces, and contaminated surfaces. Research is focused on key problems in developed and developing countries. The goal is to design and test effective interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of infectious disease.

  • Carol Boggs

    Carol Boggs

    Bing Director in Human Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in how environmental variation affects life history traits, population structure and dynamics, and species interactions in ecological and evolutionary time, using Lepidoptera.

  • Matthew Bogyo

    Matthew Bogyo

    Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab uses chemical, biochemical, and cell biological methods to study protease function in human disease. Projects include:

    1) Design and synthesis of novel chemical probes for each of the primary protease families.

    2) Understanding the role of proteolysis in the life cycle of the human parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

    3) Defining the specific functional roles of proteases during the process of tumorogenesis.

    4) In vivo imaging of protease activity

  • Cara Bohon

    Cara Bohon

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Development) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests have focused on the neural bases of eating disorders and obesity. I am particularly interested in the way emotion and reward is processed in the brain and how that may contribute to eating behavior and food restriction. I hope to eventually translate biological research findings into treatments.

  • Paul Bollyky

    Paul Bollyky

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies how immune responses are regulated within chronically inflamed or infected tissues. In particular, we study how the extracellular matrix influences local immunity and why these responses are dysregulated in autoimmune diseases, poorly healing wounds, and chronic infections.
    We welcome research students with interests in immunology, structural biology, and microbiology.

  • C. Andrew Bonham

    C. Andrew Bonham

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTolerance induction in liver transplantation.
    Hepatocyte transplantation.

  • John  Boothroyd

    John Boothroyd

    Burt and Marion Avery Professor of Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are intereseted in the interaction between the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and its mammalian host. We use a combination of molecular and genetic tools to understand how this obligate intracellular parasite can invade almost any cell it encounters, how it co-opts a host cell once inside and how it evades the immune response to produce a life-long, persistent infection.