Bio-X


Showing 601-700 of 956 Results

  • Boris Murmann

    Boris Murmann

    Professor of Electrical Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2021 To 03/31/2022

    BioBoris Murmann is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 2004 after completing his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. From 1994 to 1997, he was with Neutron Microelectronics, Germany, where he developed low-power and smart-power ASICs in automotive CMOS technology. Since 2004, he has worked as a consultant with numerous Silicon Valley companies. Dr. Murmann’s research interests are in mixed-signal integrated circuit design, with special emphasis on sensor interfaces, data converters and custom circuits for machine learning. In 2008, he was a co-recipient of the Best Student Paper Award at the VLSI Circuits Symposium and a recipient of the Best Invited Paper Award at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC). He received the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2009 and the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award in 2012. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, as well as the Data Converter Subcommittee Chair and the Technical Program Chair of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the faculty director of Stanford's System Prototyping Facility (SPF). He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

  • Mark Musen

    Mark Musen

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2020 To 03/31/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIt's important to ensuring that experimental data—and descriptions of the methods used to generate and analyze the data—are available online. Our laboratory studies methods for creating more comprehensive metadata descriptions both of data and of experiments that can be processed both by other scientists and by computers. We are also working to clean up legacy data and metadata to facilitate open science broadly. Other work focuses on management of knowledge using knowledge graphs.

  • David Myung, MD, PhD

    David Myung, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNovel biomaterials to reconstruct the wounded cornea
    Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for corneal and ocular surface regeneration
    Engineered biomolecule therapies for promote corneal wound healing

    Telemedicine in ophthalmology

  • Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD

    Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD

    Naddisy Foundation Professor of Pediatric Food Allergy, Immunology and Asthma, Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kari Nadeau’s laboratory and clinical research is focused on understanding the role of genes and the environment, including climate change, on the rising incidence of allergies and asthma. By understanding the genetic, epigenetic, cellular, and humoral factors that mediate immune tolerance or allergy to foods, aeroallegens, and air pollutants (e.g., diesel emissions and wildfires), her research is laying the groundwork for potential future therapies to prevent and cure allergies and asthma.

  • Claude M. Nagamine, DVM, PhD

    Claude M. Nagamine, DVM, PhD

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMouse models to study murine and human infectious diseases. These colloborative studies include dengue virus, zika virus, adeno-associated virus, coxsackie virus, enterovirus 71, enterohepatic helicobacters, campylobacters, and anaplasma.

  • Hiromitsu (Hiro) Nakauchi

    Hiromitsu (Hiro) Nakauchi

    Professor of Genetics (Stem Cell)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslation of discoveries in basic research into practical medical applications

  • Sandy Napel

    Sandy Napel

    Professor of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Medical Informatics) and of Electrical Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 08/01/2021 To 04/23/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research seeks to advance the clinical and basic sciences in radiology, while improving our understanding of biology and the manifestations of disease, by pioneering methods in the information sciences that integrate imaging, clinical and molecular data. A current focus is on content-based radiological image retrieval and integration of imaging features with clinical and molecular data for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapy planning decision support.

  • Sanjiv Narayan

    Sanjiv Narayan

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Narayan directs the Computational Arrhythmia Research Laboratory, whose goal is to define the mechanisms underlying complex human heart rhythm disorders, to develop bioengineering-focused solutions to improve therapy that will be tested in clinical trials. The laboratory has been funded continuously since 2001 by the National Institutes of Health, AHA and ACC, and interlinks a disease-focused group of clinicians, computational physicists, bioengineers and trialists.

  • Anupama Narla

    Anupama Narla

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are to study the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies and to translate these insights into the work-up and management of pediatric bone marrow failure syndromes.

  • Jayakar V. Nayak, MD, PhD

    Jayakar V. Nayak, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUpper Airway Stem Cell Biology, Fate, and Repair/Regeneration of the Airway Epithelium to treat Upper and Lower Airway Disorders

  • Robert Negrin

    Robert Negrin

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)
    On Leave from 01/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur labaratory focuses on the study of immune recognition by T and NK cells with special emphasis on graft vs host disease and graft vs tumor reactions. We utilize both murine and human systems in an effort to enhance graft vs tumor reactions while controlling graft vs host disease. We have developed bioluminescence models in collaboration with the Contag laboratory to study the trafficking of immune effector cells with a special emphasis on NK, T and regulatory T cells.

  • Drew Nelson

    Drew Nelson

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioResearch involves development of improved methods for predicting the fatigue life of engineering materials, incuding the effects of manufacturing processes, and investigation of new approaches in the field of experimental mechanics, such as determination of residual stresses using optical methods.

  • Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests: (i) genetic and environmental determinants of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis, (ii) transdisciplinary strategies for improving population health.

  • William Nelson

    William Nelson

    Rudy J. and Daphne Donohue Munzer Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research objectives are to understand the cellular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. Polarized epithelial cells play fundamental roles in the ontogeny and function of a variety of tissues and organs.

  • Aaron Newman

    Aaron Newman

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group develops computational strategies to study the phenotypic diversity, differentiation hierarchies, and clinical significance of tumor cell subsets. Key results are further explored experimentally, both in our lab and through collaboration, with the ultimate goal of translating promising findings into the clinic.

  • William Newsome

    William Newsome

    Director, Wu Tsai Neuroscience Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeural processes that mediate visual perception and visually-based decision making. Influence of reward history on decision making.

  • Mindie H. Nguyen, MD, MAS, AGAF, FAASLD

    Mindie H. Nguyen, MD, MAS, AGAF, FAASLD

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Epidemiology and treatment outcomes of liver cancer focusing on screening, early diagnosis with novel markers, etiologies (viral and nonviral including NALFD).
    2. Epidemiology and treatment outcomes of chronic hepatitis B and C focusing on real-world cohorts, understudied populations, and HCV genotypes 4-6.
    3. Therapeutic clinical trials for chronic hepatitis B/C and NAFLD.
    4. Health disparities and ethnicity-related issues
    5. Global health: medical education, public health, and research

  • Teresa Nicolson

    Teresa Nicolson

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur aim is to understand the molecular basis of hearing and balance. We use zebrafish as our model system, which offers distinct advantages for imaging auditory/vestibular and lateral line hair cells in intact animals. Our experiments focus on the function of deafness genes isolated from forward genetic screens and developmental aspects of sensory hair-cell activity and synaptogenesis.

  • Dwight Nishimura

    Dwight Nishimura

    Addie and Al Macovski Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmedical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging

  • Hae Young Noh

    Hae Young Noh

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioHae Young Noh is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research introduced the new concept of “structures as sensors” to enable physical structures (e.g., buildings and vehicle frames) to be user- and environment-aware. In particular, these structures indirectly sense humans and surrounding environments through their structural responses (i.e., vibrations) by inferring the desired information (e.g., human behaviors, environmental conditions, heating and cooling system performance), instead of directly measuring the sensing targets with additional dedicated sensors (e.g., cameras, motion sensors). This concept brought a paradigm shift in how we view these structures and how the structures interact with us.
    Traditionally, structures that we inhabit (such as buildings or vehicles) are considered as passive and unchanging objects that we need to monitor and control, utilizing a dense set of sensors to collect information. This has often been complicated by “noise” caused by the occupants and environments. For example, building vibrations induced by indoor and outdoor environmental and operational conditions (e.g., people walking around, traffic outside, heating system running, etc.), have been often seen as noise that needs to be removed in traditional building science and structural engineering; however, they are a rich source of information about structure, users, environment, and resources. Similarly, in vehicle engineering, researchers and engineers have been investigating control and dynamics to reduce vehicle vibration for safety and comfort. However, vibrations measured inside vehicles contain information about transportation infrastructure, vehicle itself, and driver.
    Noh's work utilizes this “noise” to empower the structures with the ability to perceive and understand the information about users and surroundings using their own responses, and actively adopt and/or interact to enhance their sustainability and the occupants’ quality of life. Since she utilizes the structure itself as a sensing medium, information collection involves a simpler set of hardware that can be easily maintained throughout the structural lifetime. However, the analysis of data to separate the desired information becomes more challenging. This challenge is addressed through high-rate dynamic sensing and multi-source inferencing. Ultimately, her work aims to allow structural systems to become general sensing platforms that are easier and more practical to deploy and maintain in a long-term.
    At Stanford University, Noh received her PhD and MS degrees in the CEE department and her second MS degree in Electrical Engineering. Noh earned her BS in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University.

  • Garry Nolan

    Garry Nolan

    Rachford and Carlota Harris Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Nolan's group uses high throughput single cell analysis technology cellular biochemistry to study autoimmunity, cancer, virology (influenza & Ebola), as well as understanding normal immune system function. Using advanced flow cytometric techniques such as Mass Cytometry, MIBI (ion beam imaging), CODEX and computational biology approaches, we focus on understanding disease processes at the single cell level. We have a strong interest in cancer immunotherapy and pathogen-host interactions.

  • Anthony Norcia

    Anthony Norcia

    Professor (Research) of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsVision, development, functional imaging, systems analysis

  • Roeland Nusse

    Roeland Nusse

    Virginia and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research and the Reed-Hodgson Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies Wnt signaling in development and disease. We found recently that Wnt proteins are unusual growth factors, because they are lipid-modified. We discovered that Wnt proteins promote the proliferation of stem cells of various origins. Current work is directed at understanding the function of the lipid on the Wnt, using Wnt proteins as factors the expand stem cells and on understanding Wnt signaling during repair and regeneration after tissue injury.

  • Paul Nuyujukian

    Paul Nuyujukian

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group explores neuroengineering and its application to both basic and clinical neuroscience. Our goal is to develop brain-machine interfaces as a platform technology for a variety of brain-related medical conditions including stroke and epilepsy.

  • Daibhid O Maoileidigh

    Daibhid O Maoileidigh

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Ó Maoiléidigh group employs mathematical and computational approaches to better understand normal hearing and hearing impairment. Because complete restoration of auditory function by artificial devices or regenerative treatments will only be possible when experiments and computational modeling align, we work closely with experimental laboratories. Our goal is to understand contemporary experimental observations, to make experimentally testable predictions, and to motivate new experiments. We are pursuing several projects.

    Hair-Bundle Mechanics

    Auditory and balance organs rely on hair cells to convert mechanical vibrations into electrical signals for transmission to the brain. In response to the quietest sounds we can hear, the hair cell's mechanical sensor, the hair bundle, moves by less than one-billionth of a meter. To determine how this astounding sensitivity is possible, we construct computational models of hair-bundle mechanics. By comparing models with experimental observations, we are learning how a hair bundle's geometry, material properties, and ability to move spontaneously determine its function.

    Cochlear Mechanics

    The cochlea contains the auditory organ that houses the sensory hair cells in mammals. Vibrations in the cochlea arising from sound are amplified more than a thousandfold by the ear's active process. New experimental techniques have additionally revealed that the cochlea vibrates in a complex manner in response to sound. We use computational models to interpret these observations and to make hypotheses about how the cochlea works.

  • Lucy Erin O'Brien

    Lucy Erin O'Brien

    Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMany adult organs tune their functional capacity to variable levels of physiologic demand. Adaptive organ resizing breaks the allometry of the body plan that was established during development, suggesting that it occurs through different mechanisms. Emerging evidence points to stem cells as key players in these mechanisms. We use the Drosophila midgut, a stem-cell based organ analogous to the vertebrate small intestine, as a simple model to uncover the rules that govern adaptive remodeling.

  • Lauren O'Connell

    Lauren O'Connell

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe O'Connell lab studies how genetic and environmental factors contribute to biological diversity and adaptation. We are particularly interested in understanding (1) how behavior evolves through changes in brain function and (2) how animal physiology evolves through repurposing existing cellular components.

  • Detlef Obal

    Detlef Obal

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am primarily working at the Cardiovascular Institute (Director Joseph Wu, MD, PhD), studying the effect of different anesthetics on human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). Considering the current opioid epidemic, I am currently focusing on the effect of chronic opioid exposure on endothelial and cardiac function.

  • Jelena Obradović

    Jelena Obradović

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdaptation, resilience, and developmental psychopathology of disadvantaged children populations; Stress reactivity and biological sensitivity to contextual influences; Executive function and self-regulatory abilities; Effects of risk, adversity, and social status on children’s development.

  • Allison Okamura

    Allison Okamura

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on developing the principles and tools needed to realize advanced robotic and human-machine systems capable of physical interaction. Application areas include surgery, simulation and training, rehabilitation, prosthetics, neuromechanics, exploration of hazardous and remote environments (e.g. space), design, and education.

  • Eric Olcott

    Eric Olcott

    Professor of Radiology (Veterans Affairs), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBody imaging utilizing CT, ultrasound and MRI. Imaging of appendicitis. Imaging of pancreatic and biliary malignancies. Imaging of trauma. Magnetic resonance angiography.

  • Richard A. Olshen

    Richard A. Olshen

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is in statistics and their applications to medicine and biology. Many efforts have concerned tree-structured algorithms for classification, regression, survival analysis, and clustering.

  • Kelly E. Ormond, MS, CGC

    Kelly E. Ormond, MS, CGC

    Clinical Professor, Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am currently serving as the Research Director for the MS in Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling program. My research focuses on the intersection between genetics and ethics, particularly around the translation of new genetic technologies (such as genome sequencing, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis and gene editing) into clinical practice. I am especially interested in patient decision making, consent and disclosure of genetic test results, and the interface between genetics and disability.

  • Anthony Oro, MD, PhD

    Anthony Oro, MD, PhD

    Eugene and Gloria Bauer Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab uses the skin to answer questions about epithelial stem cell biology, differentiation and carcinogenesis using genomics, genetics, and cell biological techniques. We have studied how hedgehog signaling regulates regeneration and skin cancer, and how tumors evolve to develop resistance. We study the mechanisms of early human skin development using human embryonic stem cells. These fundamentals studies provide a greater understanding of epithelial biology and novel disease therapeutics.

  • Nicholas Ouellette

    Nicholas Ouellette

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Environmental Complexity Lab studies self-organization in a variety of complex systems, ranging from turbulent fluid flows to granular materials to collective motion in animal groups. In all cases, we aim to characterize the macroscopic behavior, understand its origin in the microscopic dynamics, and ultimately harness it for engineering applications. Most of our projects are experimental, though we also use numerical simulation and mathematical modeling when appropriate. We specialize in high-speed, detailed imaging and statistical analysis.

    Our current research includes studies of turbulence in two and three dimensions, with a focus on coherent structures and the geometry of turbulence; the transport of inertial, anisotropic, and active particles in turbulence; the erosion of granular beds by fluid flows and subsequent sediment transport; quantitative measurements of collective behavior in insect swarms and bird flocks; the stability of ocean ecosystems; neural signal processing; and uncovering the natural, self-organized spatiotemporal scales in urban systems.

  • Art Owen

    Art Owen

    Max H. Stein Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStatistical methods to analyze large data matrices in bioinformatics

  • Julia Palacios

    Julia Palacios

    Assistant Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    BioDr. Palacios seek to provide statistically rigorous answers to concrete, data driven questions in evolutionary genetics and public health . My research involves probabilistic modeling of evolutionary forces and the development of computationally tractable methods that are applicable to big data problems. Past and current research relies heavily on the theory of stochastic processes, Bayesian nonparametrics and recent developments in machine learning and statistical theory for big data.

  • Daniel Palanker, PhD

    Daniel Palanker, PhD

    Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
    On Leave from 09/20/2021 To 12/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInteractions of electric field and light with biological cells and tissues and their applications to imaging, diagnostics, therapeutics and prosthetics, primarily in ophthalmology.
    Specific fields of interest:
    Electronic retinal prosthesis;
    Electronic enhancement of tear secretion;
    Electronic control of blood vessels;
    Non-damaging retinal laser therapy;
    Ultrafast laser surgery;
    Interferometric imaging of neural signals;
    Cell transplantation and retinal plasticity.

  • Oxana Palesh

    Oxana Palesh

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch focused on developing interventions for management of side effects of cancer treatments (e.g., sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, anxiety).

  • Theo Palmer

    Theo Palmer

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMembers of the Palmer Lab study the biology of neural stem cells in brain development and in the adult. Our primary goal is to understand how genes and environment synergize in influencing stem cell behavior during development and how mild genetic or environmental risk factors for disease may synergize in their detrimental effects on brain development or in the risk of neuronal loss in age-related degenerative disease.

  • Stephen Palumbi

    Stephen Palumbi

    Jane and Marshall Steel Jr. Professor of Marine Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe're interested in ecological, evolutionary, and conservation questions related to marine (and sometimes terrestrial) organisms and ecosystems. We use evolutionary genetics and molecular ecology techniques, and our fieldwork takes us all around the world. Currently, we're studying coral diversity, the adaptive potential of corals in response to climate change, the movement of organisms between marine reserves, genetic changes in abalone in response to environmental.

  • Alan C. Pao

    Alan C. Pao

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in how the kidneys control salt, water, and electrolyte homeostasis in the body. We use cultured kidney cells, transgenic mice, and human samples to study hormonal and signal transduction pathways that control epithelial ion transport. Clinical implications of our work include a better understanding of the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension and kidney stone formation and growth.

  • Peter Parham

    Peter Parham

    Professor of Structural Biology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Parham laboratory investigates the biology, genetics, and evolution of MHC class I molecules and NK cell receptors.

  • Jon Park, MD, FRCSC

    Jon Park, MD, FRCSC

    Saunders Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNon-fusion dynamic spinal stabilization, artificial disc technologies, and regenerative spinal technologies.

  • Karen J. Parker, PhD

    Karen J. Parker, PhD

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Parker Lab conducts research on the biology of social functioning in monkeys, typically developing humans, and patients with social impairments.

  • Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    BioDr Parvizi completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic and Neurology Residency at BIDMC Harvard Medical School before joining the UCLA for fellowship training in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy. He has worked at Stanford University Medical Center since 2007 and specializes in treating patients with uncontrollable seizures. Dr. Parvizi is the principal investigator in the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience whose research activities have been supported by National Institute of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations. To find out more about Dr Parvizi's scholarly activities please visit http://med.stanford.edu/parvizi-lab.html.

  • Anca M. Pasca, MD

    Anca M. Pasca, MD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research focus of the lab is to understand molecular mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental disorders associated with premature birth, neonatal and fetal brain injury with the long-term goal of translating the lab’s findings into therapeutics. The research team employs a multidisciplinary approach involving genetics, molecular and developmental neurobiology, animal models and neural cells differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In particular, the lab is using a powerful 3D human brain-region specific organoid system developed at Stanford (Nature Methods, 2015; Nature Protocols, 2018) to ask questions about brain injury during development.

    https://www.neopascalab.org/

  • Sergiu P. Pasca

    Sergiu P. Pasca

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA critical challenge in understanding the intricate programs underlying development, assembly and dysfunction of the human brain is the lack of direct access to intact, functioning human brain tissue for detailed investigation by imaging, recording, and stimulation.
    To address this, we are developing bottom-up approaches to generate and assemble, from multi-cellular components, human neural circuits in vitro and in vivo.
    We introduced the use of instructive signals for deriving from human pluripotent stem cells self-organizing 3D cellular structures named brain region-specific spheroids/organoids. We demonstrated that these cultures, such as the ones resembling the cerebral cortex, can be reliably derived across many lines and experiments, contain synaptically connected neurons and non-reactive astrocytes, and can be used to gain mechanistic insights into genetic and environmental brain disorders. Moreover, when maintained as long-term cultures, they recapitulate an intrinsic program of maturation that progresses towards postnatal stages.
    We also pioneered a modular system to integrate 3D brain region-specific organoids and study human neuronal migration and neural circuit formation in functional preparations that we named assembloids. We have actively applied these models in combination with studies in long-term ex vivo brain preparations to acquire a deeper understanding of human physiology, evolution and disease mechanisms.
    We have carved a unique research program that combines rigorous in vivo and in vitro neuroscience, stem cell and molecular biology approaches to construct and deconstruct previously inaccessible stages of human brain development and function in health and disease.
    We believe science is a community effort, and accordingly, we have been advancing the field by broadly and openly sharing our technologies with numerous laboratories around the world and organizing the primary research conference and the training courses in the area of cellular models of the human brain.

  • Zara Patel

    Zara Patel

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Zara M. Patel is Director of Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery and an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at Stanford. She was born and raised in St. Louis, completed her MD at the Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland, Oregon and completed her residency training in otolaryngology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, NY. After pursuing fellowship training in rhinology and endoscopic skull base surgery at Stanford University, she was recruited to join the Emory University faculty in Atlanta in 2011. After four years, the rhinology division recruited her back to the West coast to rejoin the department here at Stanford University.

    Dr. Patel is an expert in advanced endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. She treats patients with a wide variety of rhinologic complaints, including chronic sinus infection or inflammation, sinus disease that has failed medical therapy, sinus disease that has failed prior surgical therapy, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, benign and and malignant sinus and skull base tumors, as well as olfactory disorders.

    She is immediate past-Chair of the Education Committee and now Member of the Board of Directors for the American Rhinologic Society and has developed a multitude of educational materials for both physicians and patients to help them better understand rhinologic disorders. She is passionate about educating patients to allow them to make the best decisions about their own care, leading to better outcomes.

    Dr. Patel has published widely in topics such as avoiding complications in endoscopic sinus surgery, chronic rhinosinusitis in the immunosuppressed patient population, new devices and techniques for endoscopic skull base surgery, and olfactory dysfunction. She continues to perform research in these areas, and is beginning collaborative efforts with neuroscientists and engineers to develop technology that she hopes will eventually help cure patients with olfactory loss.

  • John M. Pauly

    John M. Pauly

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor

    BioInterests include medical imaging generally, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular. Current efforts are focused on medical applications of MRI where real-time interactive imaging is important. Two examples are cardiac imaging, and the interactive guidance of interventional procedures. Specific interests include rapid methods for the excitation and acquisition of the MR signal, and the reconstruction of images from the data acquired using these approaches.

  • Kim Butts Pauly

    Kim Butts Pauly

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are investigating and developing, and applying focused ultrasound in neuromodulation, blood brain barrier opening, and ablation for both neuro and body applications.

  • Jonathan Payne

    Jonathan Payne

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor & Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy goal in research is to understand the interaction between environmental change and biological evolution using fossils and the sedimentary rock record. How does environmental change influence evolutionary and ecological processes? And conversely, how do evolutionary and ecological changes affect the physical environment? I work primarily on the marine fossil record over the past 550 million years.

  • Kabir Peay

    Kabir Peay

    Associate Professor of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the ecological processes that structure natural communities and the links between community structure and the cycling of nutrients and energy through ecosystems. We focus primarily on fungi, as these organisms are incredibly diverse and are the primary agents of carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. By working across multiple scales we hope to build a 'roots-to-biomes' understanding of plant-microbe symbiosis.

  • Donna Peehl, PhD

    Donna Peehl, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Urology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular and cellular biology of the human prostate. Developing realistic experimental models is a major goal, and primary cultures of prostatic epithelial and stromal cells are my main model system. Our discoveries are relevant to prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant prostatic diseases.

  • Mark Pegram

    Mark Pegram

    Susy Yuan-Huey Hung Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of targeted therapy resistance in breast and other cancers

  • Norbert Pelc

    Norbert Pelc

    Boston Scientific Applied Biomedical Engineering Professor and Professor of Radiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBroadly, Dr. Pelc is interested in the physics, engineering and mathematics of medical imaging, especially computed tomography, digital x-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and hybrid multimodality systems. His current research is concentrated in the development of computed tomography systems with higher image quality and dose efficiency, in the characterization of system performance, and in the development and validation of new clinical applications.

  • Gary Peltz

    Gary Peltz

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe laboratory develops and uses state of the art genomic methods to identify genetic factors affecting disease susceptibility, and to translate these findings into new treatments. We have developed a more efficient method for performing mouse genetic analysis, which has been used to analyze the genetic basis for 16 different biomedical traits. We are developing novel methods, and have developed a novel experimental platform that replaces mouse liver with functioning human liver tissue.

  • Jon-Paul Pepper, MD

    Jon-Paul Pepper, MD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFacial paralysis is a debilitating condition that affects thousands of people. Despite excellent surgical technique, we are currently limited by the regenerative capacity of the body. The mission of our research is to identify new treatments that improve current facial paralysis treatments. We do this by exploring the regenerative cues that the body uses to restore tissue after nerve injury, in particular through pathways of neurogenesis and nerve repair in small mammals.

  • Claudia Katharina Petritsch

    Claudia Katharina Petritsch

    Associate Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Petritsch lab broadly investigates underlying causes for the intra-tumoral heterogeneity and immune suppression in brain tumors from a neuro-developmental perspective. Defective cell fate decisions fuel the intra-humoral heterogeneity and plasticity in human brain tumors and may contribute to immune suppression. We use patient-derived models as avatars to study how brain cells control the fate of their progeny, whereby we unravel novel points of vulnerabilities in brain tumor cells.

  • Dmitri Petrov

    Dmitri Petrov

    Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvolution of genomes and population genomics of adaptation and variation

  • Suzanne Pfeffer

    Suzanne Pfeffer

    Emma Pfeiffer Merner Professor of Medical Sciences
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major focuses of our research is to understand the molecular basis of inherited Parkinson's Disease (PD) and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which proteins and cholesterol are transported between specific membrane compartments. We focus on the LRRK2 kinase that is inappropriately activated in PD and how it phosphorylates Rab GTPases, blocking the formation of primary cilia in culture and specific regions of the brain.

  • Adolf Pfefferbaum

    Adolf Pfefferbaum

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and application of magnetic resonance imaging approaches for in vivo studies of human and animal brain integrity in neurodegenerative conditions, including alcoholism, HIV infection, Alzheimer's disease, and normal aging

  • Piero Pianetta

    Piero Pianetta

    Professor (Research) of Photon Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioPianetta's research is directed towards understanding how the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces impacts device technology pertaining to advanced semiconductors and photocathodes. His research includes the development of new analytical tools for these studies based on the use of synchrotron radiation. These include the development of ultrasensitive methods to analyze trace impurities on the surface of silicon wafers at levels as low as 1e-6 monolayer (~1e8 atoms/cm2) and the use of various photoelectron spectroscopies (X-ray photoemission, NEXAFS, X-ray standing waves and photoelectron diffraction) to determine the bonding and atomic structure at the interface between silicon and different passivating layers. Recent projects include the development of high resolution (~30nm) x-ray spectromicroscopy with applications to energy materials such as Li batteries.

  • Benjamin Pinsky

    Benjamin Pinsky

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and application of molecular assays for the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases.

  • Peter Pinsky

    Peter Pinsky

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioPinsky works in the theory and practice of computational mechanics with a particular interest in multiphysics problems in biomechanics. His work uses the close coupling of techniques for molecular, statistical and continuum mechanics with biology, chemistry and clinical science. Areas of current interest include the mechanics of human vision (ocular mechanics) and the mechanics of hearing. Topics in the mechanics of vision include the mechanics of transparency, which investigates the mechanisms by which corneal tissue self-organizes at the molecular scale using collagen-proteoglycan-ion interactions to explain the mechanical resilience and almost perfect transparency of the tissue and to provide a theoretical framework for engineered corneal tissue replacement. At the macroscopic scale, advanced imaging data is used to create detailed models of the 3-D organization of collagen fibrils and the results used to predict outcomes of clinical techniques for improving vision as well as how diseased tissue mechanically degrades. Theories for mass transport and reaction are being developed to model metabolic processes and swelling in tissue. Current topics in the hearing research arena include multiscale modeling of hair-cell mechanics in the inner ear including physical mechanisms for the activation of mechanically-gated ion channels. Supporting research addresses the mechanics of lipid bilayer cell membranes and their interaction with the cytoskeleton. Recent past research topics include computational acoustics for exterior, multifrequency and inverse problems; and multiscale modeling of transdermal drug delivery. Professor Pinsky currently serves as Chair of the Mechanics and Computation Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford.

  • Sharon Pitteri

    Sharon Pitteri

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Pitteri laboratory is focused on the discovery and validation of proteins that can be used as molecular indicators of risk, diagnosis, progression, and recurrence of cancer. Proteomic technologies, predominantly mass spectrometry, are used to identify proteins in the blood that are differentially regulated and/or post-translationally modified with disease state. Using human plasma samples, tumor tissue, cancer cell lines, and genetically engineered mouse models, the origins of these proteins are being investigated. A major goal of this research is to define novel molecular signatures for breast and ovarian cancers, including particular sub-types of these diseases. This laboratory is also focused on the identification of proteins with expression restricted to the surface of cancer cells which can be used as novel targets for molecular imaging technologies.

  • Sylvia K. Plevritis, PhD

    Sylvia K. Plevritis, PhD

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research program focuses on computational modeling of cancer biology and cancer outcomes. My laboratory develops stochastic models of the natural history of cancer based on clinical research data. We estimate population-level outcomes under differing screening and treatment interventions. We also analyze genomic and proteomic cancer data in order to identify molecular networks that are perturbed in cancer initiation and progression and relate these perturbations to patient outcomes.

  • Jim Plummer

    Jim Plummer

    John M. Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenerally studies the governing physics and fabrication technology of silicon integrated circuits, including the scaling limits of silicon technology, and the application of silicon technology outside traditional integrated circuits, including power switching devices such as IGBTs. Process simulation tools like SUPREM for simulating fabrication. Recent work has focused on wide bandgap semiconductor materials, particularly SiC and GaN, for power control devices.

  • Kilian M Pohl

    Kilian M Pohl

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe foundation of the laboratory of Associate Professor Kilian M. Pohl, PhD, is computational science aimed at identifying biomedical phenotypes improving the mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The biomedical phenotypes are discovered by unbiased, machine learning-based searches across biological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological data. This data-driven discovery currently supports the adolescent brain research of the NIH-funded National Consortium on Alcohol and NeuroDevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) and the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD), the largest long-term study of brain development and child health in the US. The laboratory also investigates brain patterns specific to alcohol use disorder and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) across the adult age range, and have advanced the understanding of a variety of brain diseases including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, glioma, and aging.

  • Mary Polan

    Mary Polan

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Polan's research has centered around ovarian function during both the follicular and luteal phases. Studies of steroidogenesis, LH receptor synthesis, and the involvement of the plasminogen activator system in ovarian events have been performed.

  • Russell Poldrack

    Russell Poldrack

    Albert Ray Lang Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab uses the tools of cognitive neuroscience to understand how decision making, executive control, and learning and memory are implemented in the human brain. We also develop neuroinformatics tools and resources to help researchers make better sense of data.

  • Jonathan Pollack

    Jonathan Pollack

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in the Pollack lab centers on translational genomics, with a focus on human cancer. The lab employs next-generation sequencing, single-cell genomics, genome editing, and cell/tissue-based modeling to uncover disease mechanisms, biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Current areas of emphasis include diseases of the prostate (prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia), as well as odontogenic neoplasms.

  • Ada Poon

    Ada Poon

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on providing theoretical foundations and engineering platforms for realizing electronics that seamlessly integrate with the body. Such systems will allow precise recording or modulation of physiological activity, for advancing basic scientific discovery and for restoring or augmenting biological functions for clinical applications.

  • Richard Popp

    Richard Popp

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAcademic-Industrial relations; Ethics of invention.

  • Matthew Porteus

    Matthew Porteus

    Sutardja Chuk Professor of Definitive and Curative Medicine

    BioDr. Porteus was raised in California and was a local graduate of Gunn High School before completing A.B. degree in “History and Science” at Harvard University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude and wrote an thesis entitled “Safe or Dangerous Chimeras: The recombinant DNA controversy as a conflict between differing socially constructed interpretations of recombinant DNA technology.” He then returned to the area and completed his combined MD, PhD at Stanford Medical School with his PhD focused on understanding the molecular basis of mammalian forebrain development with his PhD thesis entitled “Isolation and Characterization of TES-1/DLX-2: A Novel Homeobox Gene Expressed During Mammalian Forebrain Development.” After completion of his dual degree program, he was an intern and resident in Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital and then completed his Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellowship in the combined Boston Chidlren’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute program. For his fellowship and post-doctoral research he worked with Dr. David Baltimore at MIT and CalTech where he began his studies in developing homologous recombination as a strategy to correct disease causing mutations in stem cells as definitive and curative therapy for children with genetic diseases of the blood, particularly sickle cell disease. Following his training with Dr. Baltimore, he took an independent faculty position at UT Southwestern in the Departments of Pediatrics and Biochemistry before again returning to Stanford in 2010 as an Associate Professor. During this time his work has been the first to demonstrate that gene correction could be achieved in human cells at frequencies that were high enough to potentially cure patients and is considered one of the pioneers and founders of the field of genome editing—a field that now encompasses thousands of labs and several new companies throughout the world. His research program continues to focus on developing genome editing by homologous recombination as curative therapy for children with genetic diseases but also has interests in the clonal dynamics of heterogeneous populations and the use of genome editing to better understand diseases that affect children including infant leukemias and genetic diseases that affect the muscle. Clinically, Dr. Porteus attends at the Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital where he takes care of pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  • Ellen Porzig

    Ellen Porzig

    Professor (Teaching) of Developmental Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarly Human Developmental Biology:
    From Egg to Embryo
    Organogenesis: Pattern formation
    Sex Determination in Embryogenesis

  • Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery
    On Partial Leave from 09/04/2021 To 11/03/2031

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research addresses one of the most devastating and poorly treated symptoms that can develop in people with Parkinson's disease - Dementia. We use multi-modal neuroimaging along with genetic and biological markers to understand the different underlying causes of dementia and to understand why dementia develops more quickly in some patients, but not others.

  • Manu Prakash

    Manu Prakash

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioWe use interdisciplinary approaches including theory and experiments to understand how computation is embodied in biological matter. Examples include cognition in single cell protists and morphological computing in animals with no neurons and origins of complex behavior in multi-cellular systems. Broadly, we invent new tools for studying non-model organisms with significant focus on life in the ocean - addressing fundamental questions such as how do cells sense pressure or gravity? Finally, we are dedicated towards inventing and distributing “frugal science” tools to democratize access to science (previous inventions used worldwide: Foldscope, Abuzz), diagnostics of deadly diseases like malaria and convening global citizen science communities to tackle planetary scale environmental challenges such as mosquito surveillance or plankton surveillance by citizen sailors mapping the ocean in the age of Anthropocene.

  • Guillem Pratx

    Guillem Pratx

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Physical Oncology Lab is interested in making a lasting impact on translational cancer research by building novel physical tools and methods.

  • David Prince

    David Prince

    Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor of Neurology and the Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperiments examine
    1)intrinsic properties of neuronal membranes; actions of neurotransmitters that regulate neocortical and thalamic excitability
    2) chronic epileptogenesis following cortical injury; changes in intracortical connectivity and receptors;
    3) effects of early injury and activity on cortical development/maldevelopment Electrophysiological, anatomical and pharmacological techniques employed.
    4. prophylaxis of postraumatic epilepsy
    5. Neocortical interneuronal function/modulation

  • John R. Pringle

    John R. Pringle

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMuch of our research exploits the power of yeast as an experimentally tractable model eukaryote to investigate fundamental problems in cell and developmental biology such as the mechanisms of cell polarization and cytokinesis. In another project, we are developing the small sea anemone Aiptasia as a model system for study of the molecular and cellular biology of dinoflagellate-cnidarian symbiosis, which is critical for the survival of most corals but still very poorly understood.

  • Jonathan Pritchard

    Jonathan Pritchard

    Bing Professor of Population Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in a broad range of problems at the interface of genomics and evolutionary biology. One current focus of the lab is in understanding how genetic variation impacts gene regulation and complex traits. We also have long-term interests in using genetic data to learn about population structure, history and adaptation, especially in humans.

    FOR UP-TO-DATE DETAILS ON MY LAB AND RESEARCH, PLEASE SEE: http://pritchardlab.stanford.edu

  • Joseph (Jody) Puglisi

    Joseph (Jody) Puglisi

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Puglisi group investigates the role of RNA in cellular processes and disease. We investigate dynamics using single-molecule approaches. Our goal is a unified picture of structure, dynamics and function. We are currently focused on the mechanism and regulation of translation, and the role of RNA in viral infections. A long-term goal is to target processes involving RNA with novel therapeutic strategies.

  • Lei Stanley Qi

    Lei Stanley Qi

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    BioDr. Lei Stanley Qi is assistant professor in the Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, and a faculty fellow in Stanford ChEM-H. Dr. Qi is one major contributor to the CRISPR genome engineering technologies. He developed the first use of the nuclease-deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) for sequence-targeted gene regulation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. His lab further develops a broad CRISPR toolbox and technologies for precise gene regulation, epigenome editing, live cell DNA/RNA imaging (LiveFISH), 3D genome manipulation (CRISPR-GO), CRISPR antivirals for targeting RNA viruses (PAC-MAN), and miniature CRISPR (CasMINI) for gene therapy. His lab currently develops new technologies that combine genome engineering with synthetic biology to understand the functions of genomics and develop novel gene therapy. He obtained B.S. in Physics from Tsinghua University, Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of California Berkeley in 2012, and became a UCSF Systems Biology Faculty Fellow in 2012. He joined the faculty at Stanford University in 2014.

  • Jian Qin

    Jian Qin

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    BioJian Qin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Stanford University. His research focuses on development of microscopic understanding of structural and physical properties of soft matters by using a combination of analytical theory, scaling argument, numerical computation, and molecular simulation. He worked as a postdoctoral scholar with Juan de Pablo in the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago and with Scott Milner in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. He received his Ph.D. in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota under the supervision of David Morse and Frank Bates. His research covers self-assembly of multi-component polymeric systems, molecular origin of entanglement and polymer melt rheology, coacervation of polyelectrolytes, Coulomb interactions in dielectrically heterogeneous electrolytes, and surface charge polarizations in particulate aggregates in the absence or presence of flow.

  • Stephen Quake

    Stephen Quake

    Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle molecule biophysics, precision force measurement, micro and nano fabrication with soft materials, integrated microfluidics and large scale biological automation.

  • Thomas Quertermous, MD

    Thomas Quertermous, MD

    William G. Irwin Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUnderstanding genetic basis of cardiovascular function and disease.

  • Marlene Rabinovitch

    Marlene Rabinovitch

    Dwight and Vera Dunlevie Professor of Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program seeks to identify the cellular and molecular programs regulating vascular and lung development, through the use of cultured cells and tissues and mouse and rat models. We then determine how these programs are perturbed by genetic abnormalities or injurious processes associated with disease, focusing on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a fatal complication in children with heart defects, and a condition of unknown etiology primarily in young women.

  • Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology
    On Leave from 10/01/2021 To 09/30/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell function, the effects of aging on skeletal muscle and skeletal muscle stem cells, and the pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics for hereditary muscle diseases, specifically the muscular dystrophies.

  • Jianghong Rao

    Jianghong Rao

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProbe chemistry and nanotechnology for molecular imaging and diagnostics

  • Jennifer L. Raymond

    Jennifer L. Raymond

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the neural mechanisms of learning, using a combination of behavioral, neurophysiological, and computational approaches. The model system we use is a form of cerebellum-dependent learning that regulates eye movements.

  • Christopher Re

    Christopher Re

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAlgorithms, systems, and theory for the next generation of data processing and data analytics systems.