Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute


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  • Daniel A. Abrams

    Daniel A. Abrams

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAutism spectrum disorders (ASD) are among the most pervasive neurodevelopmental disorders and are characterized by significant deficits in social communication. A common observation in children with ASD is that affected individuals often “tune out” from social interactions, which likely impacts the development of social, communication, and language skills. My primary research goals are to understand why children with ASD often tune out from the social world and how this impacts social skill and brain development, and to identify remediation strategies that motivate children with ASD to engage in social interactions. The theoretical framework that guides my work is that social impairments in ASD stem from a primary deficit in identifying social stimuli, such as human voices and faces, as rewarding and salient stimuli, thereby precluding children with ASD from engaging with these stimuli.

    My program of research has provided important information regarding the brain circuits underlying social deficits in ASD. Importantly, these findings have consistently implicated key structures of the brain’s reward and salience processing systems, and support the hypothesis that impaired reward attribution to social stimuli is a critical aspect of social difficulties in ASD.

    My lab is currently conducting three research studies:

    Speaker-Listener Coupling and Brain Dynamics During Naturalistic Verbal Communication in Children with Autism
    We have a new study investigating how the brain processes and understands speech in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder as well as typically developing children. We are interested in understanding speech comprehension in children through anticipating incoming speech and accumulating speech information over a period of time.

    Speaker-Listener Coupling and Brain Dynamics During Naturalistic Verbal Communication in Alzheimer’s Disease
    In collaboration with the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, our new study is exploring how the brain enables us to understand speech, with a focus on both healthy older adults and adults with Alzheimer’s Disease. We also aim to understand how the brain measures seen while we listen and understand a story are linked to language skills in these individuals.

    Pivotal Response Treatment for Adolescents with High Functioning Autism Intervention Study
    This is a 9-week intervention focusing on key social skills for autistic adolescents, while exploring brain plasticity using fMRI imaging. Your child will receive 1:1 sessions with our clinician, with parent training in clinic. Topics include: Greetings, Departures, Question Asking, Talking the Right Amount, Empathy, Sarcasm, and Eating and Drinking. We also coordinate with the school for additional support and opportunities to practice the targeted social skills in a club of interest.

  • Monther Abu-Remaileh

    Monther Abu-Remaileh

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the role of the lysosome in metabolic adaptation using subcellular omics approaches, functional genomics and innovative biochemical tools. We apply this knowledge to understand how lysosomal dysfunction leads to human diseases including neurodegeneration, cancer and metabolic syndrome.

  • Ehsan Adeli

    Ehsan Adeli

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research lies in the intersection of Machine Learning, Computer Vision, Healthcare, and Computational Neuroscience.

  • Nima Aghaeepour

    Nima Aghaeepour

    Associate Professor (Research) of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD), of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    BioThank you for your interest. Please use the links on the bottom right side of this page to learn more about our laboratory's work.

  • Raag Airan

    Raag Airan

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to develop and clinically implement new technologies for high-precision and noninvasive intervention upon the nervous system. Every few millimeters of the brain is functionally distinct, and different parts of the brain may have counteracting responses to therapy. To better match our therapies to neuroscience, we develop techniques that allow intervention upon only the right part of the nervous system at the right time, using technologies like focused ultrasound and nanotechnology.

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group’'s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of advanced imaging techniques to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine, of Biomedical Data Science, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Neal Amin

    Neal Amin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Neal D. Amin's research findings on gene regulatory mechanisms in the human nervous system have been the basis of articles in top journals, patents, awards, and research funding. He is corresponding author on works identifying cell type-specific RNA processing changes implicated in neurodegeneration. Other products of his research include a sole-author patent on gene delivery, speaking engagements at national and international conferences, and recognition and significant research funding from the NIH and private foundations including the BBRF and the Deeda Blair Research Initiative. His work applies advanced single cell transcriptomics, mice and human brain organoids, and deep learning models to identify gene regulatory network hubs associated with a wide range of diseases.

    Dr. Amin is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford University where he leads fundamental wet and dry lab research into brain development and disease. He an attending physician in Stanford's Evaluation Clinic where he continues to see patients. He completed the Research Track Psychiatry Residency Program at Stanford University and is a board-certified psychiatrist and his postdoctoral studies with Sergiu Pasca, MD. He earned MD and PhD degrees from the University of California, San Diego with his graduate mentor Samuel L. Pfaff, PhD, at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, CA. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts from Columbia College, Columbia University.

  • Kanwaljeet S. Anand

    Kanwaljeet S. Anand

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Critical Care) and of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Anand is a translational clinical researcher who pioneered research on the endocrine-metabolic stress responses of infants undergoing surgery and developed the first-ever scientific rationale for pain perception in early life. This provided a framework for newer methods of pain assessment, numerous clinical trials of analgesia/anesthesia in newborns, infants and older children. His research focus over the past 30+ years has contributed fundamental knowledge about pediatric pain/stress, long-term effects of pain in early life, management of pain, mechanisms for opioid tolerance and withdrawal. Current projects in his laboratory are focused on developing biomarkers for repetitive pain/stress in critically ill children and the mechanisms underlying sedative/anesthetic neurotoxicity in the immature brain. He designed and directed many randomized clinical trials (RCT), including the largest-ever pediatric analgesia trial studying morphine therapy in ventilated preterm neonates. He has extensive experience in clinical and translational research from participating in collaborative networks funded by NIMH, NINDS, or NICHD, a track-record of excellent collaboration across multiple disciplines, while achieving success with large research teams like the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN). He played a leadership roles in CANDLE (Condition Affecting Neuro-Development & Learning in Early infancy) and other activities of the Urban Child Institute and UT Neuroscience Institute. More recently, he led the NeoOpioid Consortium funded by the European Commission, which collected data from 243 NICUs in 18 European countries.

  • Katrin Andreasson

    Katrin Andreasson

    Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on understanding how immune responses initiate and accelerate synaptic and neuronal injury in age-related neurodegeneration, including models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We also focus on the role of immune responses in aggravating brain injury in models of stroke. Our goal is the identification of critical immune pathways that function in neurologic disorders and that can be targeted to elicit disease modifying effects.

  • Martin S. Angst

    Martin S. Angst

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    On Partial Leave from 03/21/2024 To 04/19/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies biological and clinical determinants of human resilience using surgery as an injury model.

  • Eric Appel

    Eric Appel

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe underlying theme of the Appel Lab at Stanford University integrates concepts and approaches from supramolecular chemistry, natural/synthetic materials, and biology. We aim to develop supramolecular biomaterials that exploit a diverse design toolbox and take advantage of the beautiful synergism between physical properties, aesthetics, and low energy consumption typical of natural systems. Our vision is to use these materials to solve fundamental biological questions and to engineer advanced healthcare solutions.

  • Bruce Arnow, Ph.D.

    Bruce Arnow, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research interests include treatment outcome for major depression, particularly treatment refractory and chronic forms of major depression, as well as mediators and moderators of outcome; the epidemiology of chronic pain and depression; relationships between child maltreatment and adult sequelae, including psychiatric, medical and health care utilization.

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Stephen A. Baccus

    Stephen A. Baccus

    Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how the neural circuitry of the vertebrate retina encodes visual information and performs computations. To control and measure the retinal circuit, we present visual images while performing simultaneous two-photon imaging and multielectrode recording. We perturb the circuit as it operates using simultaneous intracellular current injection and multielectrode recording, and use the resulting large data sets to construct models of retinal computation.

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, and a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment. He has served as Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Communication for over a decade. He earned a B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford. In 2020, IEEE recognized his work with “The Virtual/Augmented Reality Technical Achievement Award”.

    He has published more than 200 academic papers, spanning the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, linguistics, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for over 25 years.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, emerged as an Amazon Best-seller eight years after its initial publication, and was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, TechCrunch, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed six Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab has exhibited VR in hundreds of venues ranging from The Smithsonian to The Superbowl.

  • Zhenan Bao

    Zhenan Bao

    K. K. Lee Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry
    On Partial Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    BioZhenan Bao joined Stanford University in 2004. She is currently a K.K. Lee Professor in Chemical Engineering, and with courtesy appointments in Chemistry and Material Science and Engineering. She was the Department Chair of Chemical Engineering from 2018-2022. She founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR) and is the current faculty director. She is also an affiliated faculty member of Precourt Institute, Woods Institute, ChEM-H and Bio-X. Professor Bao received her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from The University of Chicago in 1995 and joined the Materials Research Department of Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. She became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2001. Professor Bao currently has more than 700 refereed publications and more than 80 US patents with a Google Scholar H-index 211.

    Bao is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Inventors. Bao was elected a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Science in 2021. She is a Fellow of AAAS, ACS, MRS, SPIE, ACS POLY and ACS PMSE.

    Bao is a member of the Board of Directors for the Camille and Dreyfus Foundation from 2022. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She was an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Polymer Reviews and Synthetic Metals. She serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, ACS Nano, Accounts of Chemical Reviews, Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials, Chemical Communications, Journal of American Chemical Society, Nature Asian Materials, Materials Horizon and Materials Today. She is one of the Founders and currently sits on the Board of Directors of C3 Nano Co. and PyrAmes, both are silicon valley venture funded companies.

    Bao was a recipient of the VinFuture Prize Female Innovator 2022, ACS Award of Chemistry of Materials 2022, MRS Mid-Career Award in 2021, AICHE Alpha Chi Sigma Award 2021, ACS Central Science Disruptor and Innovator Prize in 2020, ACS Gibbs Medal in 2020, the Wilhelm Exner Medal from the Austrian Federal Minister of Science in 2018, the L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award North America Laureate in 2017. She was awarded the ACS Applied Polymer Science Award in 2017, ACS Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013 ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine Editors Choice Best of the Best new technology for 2001.

  • Annelise E. Barron

    Annelise E. Barron

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiophysical mechanisms of host defense peptides (a.k.a. antimicrobial peptides) and their peptoid mimics; also, molecular and cellular biophysics of human innate immune responses.

  • Michael Bassik

    Michael Bassik

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are an interdisciplinary lab focused on two major areas:(1) we seek to understand mechanisms of cancer growth and drug resistance in order to find new therapeutic targets(2) we study mechanisms by which macrophages and other cells take up diverse materials by endocytosis and phagocytosis; these substrates range from bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells to drugs and protein toxins. To accomplish these goals, we develop and use new technologies for high-throughput functional genomics.

  • Fiona Baumer

    Fiona Baumer

    Assistant Professor of Neurology (Pediatric Neurology) and of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCauses of Disturbed Cognition in Pediatric Epilepsy

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor, Professor of Urology, of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunction of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Automating monogenic patient diagnosis.
    2. The genomic signatures of independent divergent and convergent trait evolution in mammals.
    3. The logic of human gene regulation.
    4. The reasons for sequence ultraconservation.
    5. Cryptogenomics to bridge medical silos.
    6. Cryptogenetics to debate social injustice.
    7. Managing patient risk using machine learning.
    8. Understanding the flow of money in the US healthcare system.

  • Sean Bendall

    Sean Bendall

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to understand the mechanisms regulating the development of human systems. Drawing on both pluripotent stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and immunology, combined with novel high-content single-cell analysis (CyTOF – Mass Cytometry) and imagining (MIBI-Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging) we are creating templates of ‘normal’ human cellular behavior to both discover novel regulatory events and cell populations as well as understand dysfunctional processes such as cancer.

  • Jonathan Berger

    Jonathan Berger

    Denning Family Provostial Professor
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioJonathan Berger is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford University, where he teaches composition, music theory, and cognition at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).
    Jonathan is a 2017 Guggenheim Fellow and a 2016 winner of the Rome Prize.
    He was the founding co-director of the Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SICA, now the Stanford Arts Institute) and founding director of Yale University’s Center for Studies in Music Technology
    Described as “gripping” by both the New York Times and the Chicago Tribune, “poignant”, “richly evocative” (San Francisco Chronicle), “taut, and hauntingly beautiful” (NY Times), Jonathan Berger’s recent works deal with both consciousness and conscience. His monodrama, My Lai, toured internationally. The Kronos Quartet's recording was released by Smithsonian/Folkways. His opera, The Ritual of Breath is the Rite to Resist will be performed at Lincoln Center in July 2024.
    Thrice commissioned by The National Endowment for the Arts, Berger’a recent commissions include The Mellon and Rockefeller Foundations, Chamber Music Society, Lincoln Center, and Chamber Music America.
    Upcoming commissions include a new work for the Kronos Quartet.
    In addition to composition, Berger is an active researcher with over 80 publications in a wide range of fields relating to music, science and technology and has held research grants from DARPA, the Wallenberg Foundation, The National Academy of Sciences, the Keck Foundation, and others.
    Berger is the PI of a major grant from the Templeton Religion Trust to study how music and architecture interact to create a sense of awe.

  • Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD, ABPP, FT

    Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD, ABPP, FT

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioI am an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and a licensed clinical psychologist in the Stanford University School of Medicine. I am a suicidologist, with subspecialty expertise in clinical trials, epidemiology, and suicide prevention best practices. I have joint specialty in behavioral sleep medicine, treatment development, and thanatology. I am Founding Director of The Stanford Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory, and Co-Chair a number of initiatives to support multidisciplinary efforts in suicide prevention. Our program utilizes cognitive, biological (e.g., fMRI), and behavioral testing paradigms, with an emphasis on translational therapeutics across the lifespan. Our mission is to identify novel therapeutics, including seminal work to establish the subfield of sleep and suicide prevention. A special focus is the development of rapid-action, low-risk interventions for the prevention of suicide. Our mission is to evaluate transdiagnostic risk factors and biomarkers underlying treatment response that may inform etiology, reduce stigma, and advance innovation. Advocating for its utility as a visible, yet non-stigmatizing warning sign of suicide—our earliest work delineated sleep as a risk factor for suicidal behaviors. Funded by NIH and DOD, we subsequently conducted the first suicide prevention clinical trials, testing efficacy of a rapid-action (6 h) insomnia treatment for suicidal behaviors. These use a mechanisms focus to identify central disease processes (eg, underlying neural circuitry, behavioral factors) for anti-suicidal response. An overarching aim is to harness new technologies to aid risk prediction, precision medicine, and intervention opportunity. We are committed to improving national training practices (e.g., national needs-assessment of medical training parameters; AI for suicide prevention), and lead hospital best practices for safety in screening, triage, and postvention.

    Regarding translation to policy, I have served as a content expert for nationally-directed health initiatives with NIH, VA, DOD, DARPA, SAMHSA, CDC, and The White House. I recently led development of the CA 2020-25 Statewide Strategy for Suicide Prevention, following invited testimony (CA State Assembly) and a commissioned Policy Brief on suicide prevention best practices. Advisory and advocacy work centers on how research guides public health policy and implementation. I am especially committed to initiatives promising impact to suicide prevention on a broad scale, including universal strategies for lethal means restriction and real-time surveillance of suicidal behaviors. To this end, I have been honored to serve as a content expert to The White House Office of Science and Technology for initiatives focused on technology innovation and led advisory work promoting suicide deterrent systems for private organizations and public sites, such as the Golden Gate Bridge. I have consulted for technology companies, as well as private industry and healthcare partners.

    Inspired by maternity leaves coinciding with the above work, I have a separate research line examining organizational development, inclusive practices, sleep and employee wellness. This addresses disparate impact of institutional and federal medical leave practices on recruitment and retention of women. Our program focuses on cost-effective policy for diversity training and reduced attrition of women in medicine, law, STEM and technology fields. As such, I am dedicated to spearheading development of a Stanford Center for Policy, Inclusive Practices, and Equity Education.

    To donate or partner with us, please contact Deborah Stinchfield (Stanford Medical Center Development) medicalgiving@stanford.edu or please contact us directly.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmolecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Baker Family Director of Sarafan ChEM-H, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Radiology

    BioProfessor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). She is now the Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H.

    Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, and the Chemistry of the Future Solvay Prize, among others.

    The Bertozzi Group develops chemical tools to study the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammation, tuberculosis and most recently COVID-19. She is the inventor of "bioorthogonal chemistry", a class of chemical reactions compatible with living systems that enable molecular imaging and drug targeting. Her group also developed new therapeutic modalities for targeted degradation of extracellular biomolecules, such as antibody-enzyme conjugates and Lysosome Targeting Chimeras (LYTACs). As well, her group studies NGly1 deficiency, a rare genetic disease characterized by loss of the human N-glycanase.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi cofounded Redwood Bioscience, Enable Biosciences, Palleon Pharmaceuticals, InterVenn Bio, OliLux Bio, Grace Science LLC and Lycia Therapeutics. She is also a member of the Board of Directors of Lilly.

  • Achintya K. Bhowmik, PhD

    Achintya K. Bhowmik, PhD

    Adjunct Professor, OHNS/Otology & Neurotology Division

    BioDr. Achin Bhowmik serves on the faculty of Stanford University as an adjunct professor at the Stanford School of Medicine, where he advises research and lectures in the areas of sensory augmentation, computational perception, cognitive neuroscience, and intelligent systems. He is also an affiliate faculty member of the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute and Human Performance Alliance, and a mentor for the Stanford Institutes of Medicine Summer Research Program.

    Dr. Bhowmik is the chief technology officer and executive vice president of engineering at Starkey Hearing Technologies, a privately-held medical devices company with over 5,000 employees and operations in over 100 countries worldwide. In this role, he is responsible for the company’s technology strategy, research and development, engineering and program management departments, and leading the drive to transform hearing aids into multifunction wearable health and communication devices with advanced sensors and artificial intelligence.

    Previously, Dr. Bhowmik was the vice president and general manager of the Perceptual Computing Group at Intel Corporation, where he was responsible for the R&D, engineering, operations, and businesses in the areas of 3D sensing and interactive computing, computer vision and artificial intelligence, autonomous robots and drones, and immersive virtual and merged reality devices.

    Dr. Bhowmik is a member of the Forbes Technology Council, board of trustees for the National Captioning Institute, board of directors for OpenCV, board of advisors for the Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership at the University of California, Berkeley, and industry advisory board for the Institute for Engineering in Medicine and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. He is also on the board of directors and advisors for several technology startup companies.

    He has also held adjunct and guest professor positions at the University of California, Berkeley, Liquid Crystal Institute of the Kent State University, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, and the Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar. He received his Bachelor of Technology from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, PhD from Auburn University, and attended the Executive Program at Stanford University. He has authored over 200 publications, including two books and over 80 granted patents.

    His awards and honors include Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), President and Fellow of the Society for Information Display (SID), Fellow of the Asia-Pacific Artificial Intelligence Association (AAIA), Artificial Intelligence Excellence award by the Business Intelligence Group, Gold Globee award for “Most Innovative Person of the Year in Healthcare”, Top 25 Healthcare Technology CTOs by the Healthcare Technology Report, Notable Leaders in Healthcare by Twin Cities Business, Healthcare Heroes award by the Business Journals, Industrial Distinguished Leader award from the Asia-Pacific Signal and Information Processing Association, TIME’s Best Inventions, and the Red Dot Design award.

    Dr. Bhowmik and his work have been covered in numerous press articles, including TIME, Fortune, Wired, USA Today, US News & World Reports, Wall Street Journal, CBS News, BBC, Forbes, Bloomberg Businessweek, Scientific American, Popular Mechanics, MIT Technology Review, EE Times, The Verge, etc.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Jose Humberto Blanchet Mancilla

    Jose Humberto Blanchet Mancilla

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioJose Blanchet is a Professor of Management Science and Engineering (MS&E) at Stanford. Prior to joining MS&E, he was a professor at Columbia (Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, and Statistics, 2008-2017), and before that he taught at Harvard (Statistics, 2004-2008). Jose is a recipient of the 2010 Erlang Prize and several best publication awards in areas such as applied probability, simulation, operations management, and revenue management. He also received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2010. He worked as an analyst in Protego Financial Advisors, a leading investment bank in Mexico. He has research interests in applied probability and Monte Carlo methods. He is the Area Editor of Stochastic Models in Mathematics of Operations Research. He has served on the editorial board of Advances in Applied Probability, Bernoulli, Extremes, Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Journal of Applied Probability, Queueing Systems: Theory and Applications, and Stochastic Systems, among others.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor, Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Kwabena Boahen

    Kwabena Boahen

    Professor of Bioengineering, of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBoahen's group analyzes neural behavior computationally to elucidate principles of neural design at the cellular, circuit, and systems levels; and synthesizes neuromorphic electronic systems that scale energy-use with size as efficiently as the brain does. This interdisciplinary research program bridges neurobiology and medicine with electronics and computer science, bringing together these seemingly disparate fields.

  • Jo Boaler

    Jo Boaler

    Nomellini and Olivier Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudying the Impact of a Mathematical Mindset Summer Intervention, HapCaps: Design and Validation of Haptic Devices for improving Finger Perception (with engineering & neuroscience) The effectiveness of a student online class (https://lagunita.stanford.edu/courses/Education/EDUC115-S/Spring2014/about) (NSF). Studies on mathematics and mindset with Carol Dweck and Greg Walton (various funders). Studying an online network and it's impact on teaching and learning (Gates foundation)

  • Cara Bohon

    Cara Bohon

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests have focused on the neural bases of eating disorders. I am particularly interested in the way emotion and reward is processed in the brain and how that may contribute to eating behavior and food restriction. I hope to eventually translate biological research findings into treatments.

  • Paul Bollyky

    Paul Bollyky

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChronic bacterial infections are a major health care problem. Our lab is interested in understanding the host and microbial factors that perpetuate chronic infections and in developing novel therapeutic interventions to improve human health.

  • Anna Maria Bombardieri

    Anna Maria Bombardieri

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Masters Student in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, admitted Autumn 2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overall research goal is to advance clinical practice by providing anesthesiologists with data to most effectively maintain cerebral blood flow in the perioperative period.
    I am interested in the effect of the autonomic nervous system on cerebral blood flow regulation.
    I intend to combine regional anesthetic techniques and noninvasive bedside cerebral blood flow monitoring to understand the effect of the sympathetic system on cerebral blood flow.
    A secondary goal is to apply this new knowledge to investigate whether cervical sympathetic blocks improve long term neurological outcomes.

  • Steven Boxer

    Steven Boxer

    Camille Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlease visit my website for complete information:
    http://www.stanford.edu/group/boxer/

  • Mark Brongersma

    Mark Brongersma

    Stephen Harris Professor, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioMark Brongersma is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Materials Science from the FOM Institute in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 1998. From 1998-2001 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the California Institute of Technology. During this time, he coined the term “Plasmonics” for a new device technology that exploits the unique optical properties of nanoscale metallic structures to route and manipulate light at the nanoscale. His current research is directed towards the development and physical analysis of nanostructured materials that find application in nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. Brongersma received a National Science Foundation Career Award, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, the International Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences (Physics) for his work on plasmonics, and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the SPIE, and the American Physical Society.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.

  • Axel Brunger

    Axel Brunger

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Neurology, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOne of Axel Brunger's major goals is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of synaptic neurotransmitter release by conducting imaging and single-molecule/particle reconstitution experiments, combined with near-atomic resolution structural studies of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  • Jennifer L. Bruno

    Jennifer L. Bruno

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bruno is a translational researcher at the interface of developmental cognitive neuropsychology and neurobiology. An overarching goal of her work is to understand developmental windows of vulnerability—periods of risk for falling off the trajectory of typical brain development. Her research utilizes genetics, brain imaging, and deep behavioral phenotyping to bridge computational science with clinical knowledge, translating cutting-edge science to solve problems of great clinical need.

  • Zev Bryant

    Zev Bryant

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. My laboratory seeks to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work.

  • Vivek P. Buch, MD

    Vivek P. Buch, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Buch is a neurosurgeon with fellowship training in epilepsy, functional, and minimally invasive neurosurgery. He is an Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, and Christina and Hamid Moghadam Faculty Scholar at Stanford University.

    Dr. Buch focuses his expertise on the open and minimally invasive treatment of epilepsy, low grade brain tumors, movement and neuropsychiatric disorders, facial and body pain syndromes, and other complex neurological conditions. He uses advanced and innovative techniques to treat both adult and pediatric patients. For each patient, he develops a personalized care plan that is designed to be both comprehensive and compassionate.

    Dr. Buch has conducted extensive research. His career goal is to develop restorative bioengineering approaches for complex neurocognitive, neurodevelopmental, and neuropsychiatric disorders. He is creating network-neuroprosthetics and focused ultrasound delivery mechanisms for precision cellular, gene, and molecular therapies to restore abnormal brain circuit function in these vulnerable patient populations. He is further pioneering novel intraoperative technologies including personalized network-based targeting, holographic mixed reality, and artificial intelligence platforms for minimally invasive cranial surgery.

    He has co-authored articles on his research discoveries in Nature Medicine, Neuron, Brain, Annals of Surgery, Frontiers in Neuroscience, Epilepsia, Brain Stimulation, Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Surgical Innovation, Frontiers in Surgery, Journal of Neurosurgery, and many other journals. Articles focus on developing novel network control theory applications to human brain functions and new techniques and technologies to enhance neurosurgical effectiveness and patient outcomes.

    He is the Section Editor for NEUROSURGERY, and a guest editor for Surgical Innovation and Brain Sciences. He also has co-authored chapters in the books Neurosurgical Atlas, Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery, Deep Brain Stimulation, and The Encyclopedia of Medical Robotics.

    Dr. Buch has presented the findings of his research at the national conferences of numerous professional associations. Among them are the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Society for Neuroscience, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine. Topics include understanding network mechanisms of cognitive control and advances in the use of augmented reality technology to enhance neurosurgical approaches.

    For his clinical, research, and academic achievements. Dr. Buch has earned many honors. He has won awards from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, American Roentgen Ray Society, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and National Institutes of Health.

    Dr. Buch is a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, World Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, American Association of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, and Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society.

    He holds patents on such topics as artificial intelligence systems designed to help guide surgery and neural control signals for behavioral modification and closed-loop stimulation therapy.

  • Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neurology
    On Leave from 11/13/2023 To 08/08/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms of epilepsy, especially temporal lobe epilepsy.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic and clinical research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how they affect short-term brain injury and long term outcomes like dementia and depression.

  • Marshall Burke

    Marshall Burke

    Associate Professor at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, at the Woods Institute for the Environment, at SIEPR and Professor, by courtesy of Earth System Science

    BioMarshall Burke is an associate professor in Global Environmental Policy unit in the Doerr School of Sustainability, deputy director at the Center on Food Security and the Environment, and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), Woods Institute, and SIEPR at Stanford University. He is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a co-founder of AtlasAI, a remote sensing start-up. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change and on measuring and understanding economic development in emerging markets. His work has appeared in both economic and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in international relations from Stanford University.

    Prospective students should see my personal webpage, linked at right.

  • Eugene Butcher

    Eugene Butcher

    Klaus Bensch Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur interests include:
    1) The physiology and function of lymphocyte homing in local and systemic immunity;
    2) Biochemical and genetic studies of molecules that direct leukocyte recruitment;
    3) Chemotactic mechanisms and receptors in vascular and immune biology;
    4) Vascular control of normal and pathologic inflammation and immunity;
    5) Systems biology of immune cell trafficking and programming in tumor immunity.

  • Weidong Cai

    Weidong Cai

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioMy research focuses on brain mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits in two distinct populations: children with neurodevelopmental disorders, especially kids with ADHD, and elders with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. By integrating cognitive, neuroscience, and computational models with advanced functional neuroimaging techniques, my goal is to understand the neurocognitive factors that contribute to typical and atypical brain development and aging.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Mechanical Engineering

    BioDavid B. Camarillo is Associate Professor of Bioengineering, (by courtesy) Mechanical Engineering and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Camarillo holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Biophysics at the UCSF and Biodesign Innovation at Stanford. Dr. Camarillo worked in the surgical robotics industry at Intuitive Surgical and Hansen Medical, before launching his laboratory at Stanford in 2012. His current research focuses on precision human measurement for multiple clinical and physiological areas including the brain, heart, lungs, and reproductive system. Dr. Camarillo has been awarded the Hellman Fellowship, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program award, among other honors including multiple best paper awards in brain injury and robotic surgery. His research has been funded by the NIH, NSF, DoD, as well as corporations and private philanthropy. His lab’s research has been featured on NPR, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Science News, ESPN, and TED.com as well as other media outlets aimed at education of the public.

  • Victor G. Carrión

    Victor G. Carrión

    John A. Turner Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
    On Partial Leave from 03/01/2024 To 05/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExamines the interplay between brain development and stress vulnerability via a multi-method approach that includes psychophysiology, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology and phenomenology. Treatment development that focuses on individual and community-based interventions for stress related conditions in children and adolescents that experience traumatic stress.

  • Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are committed to promoting an understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and ensuring that all patients who are suffering from cerebrospinal fluid leaks receive appropriate diagnosis and treatment of this devastating, chronic, and fixable condition. We believe this can be best accomplished in a multidisciplinary setting involving expertise in radiology, neurology, and interventional pain medicine.

  • Laura L. Carstensen

    Laura L. Carstensen

    Director, Stanford Center on Longevity, Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr. Professor of Public Policy and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Policy

    BioLaura L. Carstensen is Professor of Psychology at Stanford University where she is the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy and founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. Her research on the theoretical and empirical study of motivational, cognitive, and emotional aspects of aging has been funded by the National Institute on Aging without interruption for more than 30 years. Carstensen is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She served on the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on an Aging Society and was a commissioner on the Global Roadmap for Healthy Longevity. Carstensen’s awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Kleemeier Award, The Richard Kalish Award for Innovative Research and distinguished mentor awards from both the Gerontological Society of America and the American Psychological Association. She is the author of A Long Bright Future: Happiness, Health, and Financial Security in an Age of Increased Longevity. Carstensen received her B.S. from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from West Virginia University. She holds an honorary doctorate from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

  • Lynette Cegelski

    Lynette Cegelski

    Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program is inspired by the challenge and importance of elucidating chemical structure and function in complex biological systems and the need for new strategies to treat infectious diseases. The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in generating crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, for many fascinating systems, formidable challenges exist in building complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell factories. We have introduced uniquely enabling problem-solving approaches integrating solid-state NMR spectroscopy with microscopy and biochemical and biophysical tools to determine atomic- and molecular-level detail in complex macromolecular assemblies and whole cells and biofilms. We are uncovering new chemistry and new chemical structures produced in nature. We identify small molecules that influence bacterial assembly processes and use these in chemical genetics approaches to learn about bacterial cell wall, amyloid and biofilm assembly.

    Translationally, we have launched a collaborative antibacterial drug design program integrating synthesis, chemical biology, and mechanistic biochemistry and biophysics directed at the discovery and development of new antibacterial therapeutics targeting difficult-to-treat bacteria.

  • Chris Chafe

    Chris Chafe

    Duca Family Professor

    BioChris Chafe is a composer, improvisor, and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). In 2019, he was International Visiting Research Scholar at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies The University of British Columbia, Visiting Professor at the Politecnico di Torino, and Edgard-Varèse Guest Professor at the Technical University of Berlin. At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he has pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's jacktrip project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in sometimes novel venues. An early network project was a simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe’s works include gallery and museum music installations which are now into their second decade with “musifications” resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD’s. Recent work includes the Earth Symphony, the Brain Stethoscope project (Gnosisong), PolarTide for the 2013 Venice Biennale, Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland.

  • Pak H. Chan

    Pak H. Chan

    The James R. Doty Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeuronal death and regeneration after strokeand neural injury

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • Kay W. Chang, MD

    Kay W. Chang, MD

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestshttp://med.stanford.edu/ohns/research/labs_chang.html

  • Steven D. Chang, MD

    Steven D. Chang, MD

    Robert C. and Jeannette Powell Neurosciences Professor and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research includes studies in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms and AVMs, as well as the use of radiosurgery to treat tumors and vascular malformations of the brain and spine.

    Dr. Chang is C0-Director of the Cyberknife Radiosurgery Program.

    Dr. Chang is also the head of the The Stanford Neuromolecular Innovation Program with the goal of developing new technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by neurological conditions.

  • Akshay Chaudhari

    Akshay Chaudhari

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Chaudhari is interested in the application of artificial intelligence techniques to all aspects of medical imaging, including automated schedule and reading prioritization, image reconstruction, quantitative analysis, and prediction of patient outcomes. His interests range from developing novel data-efficient machine learning algorithms to clinical deployment and validation of patient outcomes. He is also exploring combining imaging with clinical, natural language, and time series data.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, of Developmental Biology and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory combines chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    On Leave from 11/01/2023 To 04/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWhat distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Xiaoke Chen

    Xiaoke Chen

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to understand how brain circuits mediate motivated behaviors and how maladaptive changes in these circuits cause mood disorders. To achieve this goal, we focus on studying the neural circuits for pain and addiction, as both trigger highly motivated behaviors, whereas, transitioning from acute to chronic pain or from recreational to compulsive drug use involves maladaptive changes of the underlying neuronal circuitry.

  • Alan G. Cheng, MD

    Alan G. Cheng, MD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsActive Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • E.J. Chichilnisky

    E.J. Chichilnisky

    John R. Adler Professor, Professor of Neurosurgery and of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunctional circuitry of the retina and design of retinal prostheses

  • Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsContribution of T cells to immunocompetence and autoimmunity; how the immune system clears infection, avoids autoimmunity and how infection impacts on the development of immune responses.

  • Wah Chiu

    Wah Chiu

    Wallenberg-Bienenstock Professor and Professor of Bioengineering and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research includes methodology improvements in single particle cryo-EM for atomic resolution structure determination of molecules and molecular machines, as well as in cryo-ET of cells and organelles towards subnanometer resolutions. We collaborate with many researchers around the country and outside the USA on understanding biological processes such as protein folding, virus assembly and disassembly, pathogen-host interactions, signal transduction, and transport across cytosol and membranes.

  • Steven Chu

    Steven Chu

    William R. Kenan Jr. Professor, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Energy Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSynthesis, functionalization and applications of nanoparticle bioprobes for molecular cellular in vivo imaging in biology and biomedicine. Linear and nonlinear difference frequency mixing ultrasound imaging. Lithium metal-sulfur batteries, new approaches to electrochemical splitting of water. CO2 reduction, lithium extraction from salt water

  • Thomas Clandinin

    Thomas Clandinin

    Shooter Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Clandinin lab focuses on understanding how neuronal circuits assemble and function to perform specific computations and guide behavior. Taking advantage of a rich armamentarium of genetic tools available in the fruit fly, combined with imaging, physiology and analytical techniques drawn from systems neuroscience, we examine a variety of visual circuits.

  • David Clark

    David Clark

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioMy career is dedicated to improving the safety, effectiveness and availability of pain relief. Both the needs and opportunities in these areas are limitless. I have had the good fortune of working as a clinician, teacher and scientist at Stanford University and the Palo Alto VA hospital for more than two decades.

    Much of my time is spent on laboratory, translational and clinical research. In the laboratory, we are pursuing several projects related to the questions of why pain sometimes becomes chronic after injuries and why opioids lose their effectiveness over time. Alterations in endogenous pain control mechanisms and the involvement of the adaptive system of immunity are central to these investigations. We would like to find ways to maximize functional recovery after surgery and other forms of trauma while minimizing the risks of analgesic use. This work involves local, national and international collaborations. Clinical trials work involves establishing the efficacy of novel forms of analgesic therapy as well as the comparative effectiveness of long-established approaches to controlling common forms of pain such as low back pain. This spectrum of pain-related pursuits continues to evolve with the rapid expansion of the field.

  • Eve Clark

    Eve Clark

    Richard Lyman Professor in the Humanities, Emerita

    BioI am interested in first language acquisition, the acquisition of meaning, acquisitional principles in word-formation compared across children and languages, and general semantic and pragmatic issues in the lexicon and in language use. I am currently working on the kinds of pragmatic information adults offer small children as they talk to them, and on children's ability to make use of this information as they make inferences about unfamiliar meanings and about the relations between familiar and unfamiliar words. I am interested in the inferences children make about where to 'place' unfamiliar words, how they identify the relevant semantic domains, and what they can learn about conventional ways to say things based on adult responses to child errors during acquisition. All of these 'activities' involve children and adults placing information in common ground as they interact. Another current interest of mine is the construction of verb paradigms: how do children go from using a single verb form to using forms that contrast in meaning -- on such dimensions as person, number, and tense? How do they learn to distinguish the meanings of homophones? To what extent do they make use of adult input to discern the underlying structure of the system? And how does conversation with more expert speakers (usually adults) foster the acquisition of a first language? I am particularly interested in the general role of practice along with feedback here.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor of Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Maria Inmaculada Cobos Sillero

    Maria Inmaculada Cobos Sillero

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab uses cellular and molecular methods, single-cell technology, and quantitative histology to study human neurodegenerative diseases. Current projects include:

    - Using single-cell RNA-sequencing to understand selective vulnerability and disease progression in human Alzheimer’s disease brain

    - Investigating mechanisms of tau-related neurodegeneration in human brain

    - Studying the neocortical and limbic systems in Diffuse Lewy Body Disease (DLBD) at the single cell level

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research, Addie and Al Macovski Professor and Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Genetics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study mechanisms that affect the expression and decay of normal and abnormal mRNAs, and also RNA-related mechanisms that regulate microbial antibiotic resistance. A small bioinformatics team within our lab has developed knowledge based systems to aid in investigations of genes.

  • Todd Coleman

    Todd Coleman

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioTodd P. Coleman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, and by courtesy, Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received B.S. degrees in electrical engineering (summa cum laude), as well as computer engineering (summa cum laude) from the University of Michigan (Go Blue). He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in electrical engineering and computer science. He did postdoctoral studies at MIT and Mass General Hospital in quantitative neuroscience. He previously was a faculty member in the Departments of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the University of California, San Diego, respectively. Dr. Coleman’s research is very multi-disciplinary, using tools from applied probability, physiology, and bioelectronics. Examples include, for instance, optimal transport methods in high-dimensional uncertainty quantification and developing technologies and algorithms to monitor and modulate physiology of the nervous systems in the brain and visceral organs. He has served as a Principal Investigator on grants from the NSF, NIH, Department of Defense, and multiple private foundations. Dr. Coleman is an inventor on 10 granted US patents. He has been selected as a Gilbreth Lecturer for the National Academy of Engineering, a TEDMED speaker, and a Fellow of IEEE as well as the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is currently the Chair of the National Academies Standing Committee on Biotechnology Capabilities and National Security Needs.

  • Steven Hartley Collins

    Steven Hartley Collins

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    BioSteve Collins is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, where he teaches courses on design and robotics and directs the Stanford Biomechatronics Laboratory. His primary focus is to speed and systematize the design and prescription of prostheses and exoskeletons using versatile device emulator hardware and human-in-the-loop optimization algorithms (Zhang et al. 2017, Science). Another interest is efficient autonomous devices, such as highly energy-efficient walking robots (Collins et al. 2005, Science) and exoskeletons that use no energy yet reduce the metabolic energy cost of human walking (Collins et al. 2015, Nature).

    Prof. Collins received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 from Cornell University, where he performed undergraduate research on passive dynamic walking robots. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 2008 from the University of Michigan, where he performed research on the dynamics and control of human walking. He performed postdoctoral research on humanoid robots at T. U. Delft in the Netherlands. He was a professor of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University for seven years. In 2017, he joined the faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University.

    Prof. Collins is a member of the Scientific Board of Dynamic Walking and the Editorial Board of Science Robotics. He has received the Young Scientist Award from the American Society of Biomechanics, the Best Medical Devices Paper from the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, and the student-voted Professor of the Year in his department.

  • Le Cong

    Le Cong

    Assistant Professor of Pathology (Pathology Research) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab are developing gene-editing technologies, such as CRISPR systems for in vivo therapy, and cleavage-free techniques for large gene insertion via microbial recombinase. Our team also pioneers in single-cell tracking for cancer and immunology studies using novel CRISPR tools. To accelerate our work, we integrate AI and machine learning into these technologies, design and evolve proteins/RNAs, pushing frontiers in understanding and treating neurological and immunological disease.

  • Christos E. Constantinou

    Christos E. Constantinou

    Associate Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main recent interest is the application of Biomedical Engineering approaches for the clinical visualization and characterization of the static and dynamic properties of pelvic floor function. This extends to ultrasound Imaging and image processing, construction of computer models and biomechanics analysis of pelvic floor function. It is envisioned that these considerations are important constituents of the clinical evaluation of patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction and urodynamics.

  • Simon Conti

    Simon Conti

    Clinical Associate Professor, Urology

    BioI am a founding member of the Stanford Urolithiasis Project, where we have studied population health datasets to examine surgical outcomes and environmental risk factors in urinary stone disease. Our current focus includes socioeconomic and ethnic disparities in kidney stone disease, water quality and stone disease, pregnancy in kidney stone disease and geographical variations in kidney stones incidence and metabolic kidney stone work up.

  • Graham Creasey

    Graham Creasey

    Paralyzed Veterans of America Professor of Spinal Cord Injury Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeural prostheses to stimulate and record from the peripheral and central nervous system, thereby directly connecting nervous systems with electronic systems

    Neural prostheses for control of bladder, bowel and sexual function after spinal cord injury

  • Bianxiao Cui

    Bianxiao Cui

    Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur objective is to develop new biophysical methods to advance current understandings of cellular machinery in the complicated environment of living cells. Currently, we are focusing on four research areas: (1) Membrane curvature at the nano-bio interface; (2) Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) for scalable intracellular electrophysiology; (3) Electrochromic optical recording (ECORE) for neuroscience; and (4) Optical control of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases.

  • Yi Cui

    Yi Cui

    Fortinet Founders Professor, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, of Energy Science and Engineering, of Photon Science, Senior Fellow at Woods and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    BioCui studies fundamentals and applications of nanomaterials and develops tools for their understanding. Research Interests: nanotechnology, batteries, electrocatalysis, wearables, 2D materials, environmental technology (water, air, soil), cryogenic electron microscopy.

  • Mark Cutkosky

    Mark Cutkosky

    Fletcher Jones Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioCutkosky applies analyses, simulations, and experiments to the design and control of robotic hands, tactile sensors, and devices for human/computer interaction. In manufacturing, his work focuses on design tools for rapid prototyping.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUltrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). He obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard U and performed postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Smalley. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Gary Darmstadt

    Gary Darmstadt

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have extensive experience in the development of global health innovations and in working to test and scale-up health interventions. At Stanford University, I am playing a leading role in developing global women and children’s health research and educational programs, including the establishment of a Global Center for Gender Equality at Stanford University. My research focuses on advancing child health and development in low resource settings and advancing gender equality and health globally, and includes several applications of artificial intelligence. Before joining Stanford, I was Senior Fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), where I led the development of initiatives to address gender inequalities and empower women and girls. Prior to this role, I served as the BMGF Director of Family Health, leading strategy development and implementation across maternal, newborn and child health, nutrition, and family planning. In this role, I was responsible for investments ranging from scientific discovery to intervention development and delivery of interventions at scale. I worked closely with the Discovery team to shape discovery and development investments and was a co-founder of the Saving Lives at Birth Development Grand Challenge, the Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development Grand Challenge, and the Healthy Birth, Growth and Development initiative. Based on these experiences, I understand how to identify knowledge gaps and generate evidence of impact for new interventions, and how to utilize evidence to influence the policy dialogue leading to programmatic adoption and scale-up of interventions in low income settings. As Director of Family Health, I also co-led the development and implementation of the BMGF global health strategy for India, which cuts across multiple health and development sectors. Before joining BMGF, I was Associate Professor and Founding Director of the International Center for Advancing Neonatal Health in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. I led the development of newborn health research, including numerous facility- and community-based maternal and child health research trials. Before joining Johns Hopkins, I was Senior Research Advisor for the $50M Saving Newborn Lives program of Save the Children-US, where I led the development and implementation of the global research strategy for newborn health and survival.

  • Rhiju Das

    Rhiju Das

    Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab seeks an agile and predictive understanding of how nucleic acids and proteins code for information processing in living systems. We develop new computational & chemical tools to enable the precise modeling, regulation, and design of RNA and RNA/protein machines.

  • Reinhold Dauskardt

    Reinhold Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Associate Dean for Integrative Initiatives in Institutes and International Partnerships, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability and Higgins-Magid Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Davis’ research and teaching deals broadly with the role that water plays in promoting public health and economic development, with particular emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Her group conducts applied research that utilizes theory and analytical methods from public and environmental health, engineering, microeconomics, and planning. They have conducted field research in more than 20 countries, most recently including Zambia, Bangladesh, and Kenya.

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    Director, Stanford Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection and the Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.