School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-100 of 506 Results

  • James L. Adams

    James L. Adams

    Professor of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management and of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have for some time been working on two books. The working title for one is Making, Fixing, and Tinkering, and it concerns the benefits of working with the hands. The other has a working title of Homo Demi Sapiens, and is about the balance of creativity and control in very large groups (societies, religions, etc.). I am also revising a book entitled The Building of an Engineer, which I wrote for my aging mother and self-published. It is somewhat autobiographical, and although it is available on Amazon, I do not consider it quite ready for public reading.

  • Maneesh Agrawala

    Maneesh Agrawala

    Forest Baskett Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComputer Graphics, Human Computer Interaction and Visualization.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Joellen Anderson

    Joellen Anderson

    Lecturer

    BioJoEllen earned a Ph.D. in Sociology from Stanford University. She has taught at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and currently teaches at the University of California, Berkeley where she also serves as Co-Director of The Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues in the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues.

    JoEllen grew up on the Ft. Peck Indian Reservation in Montana. She is currently working on a book about her tribe, the Ojibwe, and their migrations to North Dakota and Montana in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    Her publications include “Cowboys & Indians, the Perceptions of Western Films Among American Indians and Anglos,” and “Ft. Peck Indian Reservation.”

  • R. Lanier Anderson

    R. Lanier Anderson

    Senior Associate Dean for the Humanities and Arts and J. E. Wallace Sterling Professor of the Humanities

    BioR. Lanier Anderson (Professor of Philosophy, J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor in Humanities) works in the history of late modern philosophy and has focused primarily on Kant and his influence on nineteenth century philosophy. He is the author of The Poverty of Conceptual Truth (OUP, 2015) and many articles on Kant, Nietzsche, and the neo-Kantian movement. Some papers include “It Adds Up After All: Kant’s Philosophy of Arithmetic in Light of the Traditional Logic” (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 2004), “Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption” (European Journal of Philosophy, 2005), “What is a Nietzschean Self?” in Janaway and Robertson, eds., Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Normativity (OUP, 2011), and “‘What is the Meaning of our Cheerfulness?’: Philosophy as a Way of Life in Nietzsche and Montaigne” (European Journal of Philosophy, 2018). Current research interests include Kant’s theoretical philosophy, Nietzsche’s moral psychology, Montaigne, and special topics concerning existentialism and the relations between philosophy and literature (see, e.g., “Is Clarissa Dalloway Special?” Philosophy and Literature, 2017). He has been at Stanford since 1996, and has also taught at Harvard, Haverford, Bryn Mawr, and Penn. With Joshua Landy (Comparative Literature, French), he has been instrumental in Stanford’s Philosophy and Literature Initiative. He currently serves Stanford as Senior Associate Dean for Humanities and Arts.

  • Jason Andrews

    Jason Andrews

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory aims to develop and test innovative approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and control of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. We draw upon multiple fields including mathematical modeling, microbial genetics, field epidemiology, statistical inference and biodesign to work on challenging problems in infectious diseases, with an emphasis on tuberculosis and tropical diseases.

  • Anthony Antonio

    Anthony Antonio

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransitions to postsecondary education; racial, ethnic, and religious minority college student development.

  • Arto Anttila

    Arto Anttila

    Associate Professor of Linguistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhonology, morphology, language variation

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and a Faculty Leader at Stanford’s Center for Longevity. He earned a B.A. cum laude from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford.

    He has published more than 100 academic papers, in interdisciplinary journals such as Science, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and PLoS One, as well domain-specific journals in the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for 15 years.

    Bailenson consults pro bono on Virtual Reality policy for government agencies including the State Department, the US Senate, Congress, the California Supreme Court, the Federal Communication Committee, the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, and the National Institutes of Health.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court outlining the effects of immersive media. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for The Washington Post, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed five Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab’s research has exhibited publicly at museums and aquariums, including a permanent installation at the San Jose Tech Museum.

  • Adam Banks

    Adam Banks

    Professor of Education

    BioCommitted teacher. Midnight Believer. A Slow Jam in a Hip Hop world. Cerebral and silly, outgoing and a homebody. Vernacular and grounded but academic and idealistic too. Convinced that Donny Hathaway is the most compelling artist of the entire soul and funk era, and that we still don't give Patrice Rushen enough love. I'm a crate digger, and DJ with words and ideas, and I believe that the people, voices and communities we bring with us to Stanford are every bit as important as those with which we engage here at Stanford.

    Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, I come to Stanford from the University of Kentucky, where I served on the faculty of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies and prior to that, from Syracuse University, as a member of the faculty of the Writing Program. In addition to these appointments I served as the Langston Hughes Visiting Professor of English at the University of Kansas and, jointly with Andrea Lunsford, as the Rocky Gooch Visiting Professor for the Bread Loaf School of English.

    My scholarship lies at the intersections of writing, rhetoric and technology issues; my specialized interests include African American rhetoric, community literacy, digital rhetorics and digital humanities. My most recent book is titled Digital Griots: African American Rhetoric in a Multimedia Age, and my current digital/book project is titled Technologizing Funk/Funkin Technology: Critical Digital Literacies and the Trope of the Talking Book.

  • Khalil Barhoum

    Khalil Barhoum

    Senior Lecturer in the Language Center

    BioKhalil Barhoum is a Senior Lecturer in Linguistics. He holds a B.A. in English Language and Literature from the University of Jordan. He came to the U.S. on a Rotary International scholarship, which helped him earn a Masters' degree in English Literature from Georgia Southern in 1977; he received a second Masters and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from Georgetown University in 1985. His teaching experience includes the US State Department's Foreign Service Institute (FSI), Georgetown University, and the Johns Hopkins' School of International Studies (SAIS). Upon obtaining his Ph.D from Georgetown University, he joined Stanford University where he taught Arabic in the Department of Linguistics. Currently, he is coordinator of Stanford's Program of African and Middle Eastern Languages in the Language Center. He is an ACTFL-certified OPI and WPT Tester/Rater in Arabic and has served on the board of the Association of Arabic Teachers in America (AATA). He is a former national president of the Association of Arab American University Graduates(AAUG) and has served twice as the president of its California Chapter. He is also a member of the Advisory Board of the Encyclopedia of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, edited by Cheryl Rubenberg and published by Lynne Rienner Publishers in 2010. In addition to teaching Arabic courses at all various levels, Dr. Barhoum has designed and taught several language and culture courses, including Arabic Calligraphy; Media Arabic; Colloquial Arabic; Arab Women Writers and Issues; The West through Arab Eyes; The Arab World through Travel Literature; and The Arab World and Culture through Literature. Dr. Barhoum has lectured on Arabic and Arabic literature, Arabic calligraphy, and the Arab world at several college campuses, including Princeton, UC Berkeley, UCLA, and UMASS Amherst, among others.

  • Michele Barry, MD, FACP

    Michele Barry, MD, FACP

    Drs. Ben & A. Jess Shenson Professor, Senior Associate Dean, Global Health, Director, Center for Innovation in Global Health, Professor of Medicine & Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and at the Freeman Spogli Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAreas of research
    Ethical Aspects of research conducted overseas
    Clinical Tropical Diseases
    Globalization's Impact upon Health Disparities
    Hemorrhagic Viruses

  • Jonathan Berger

    Jonathan Berger

    Denning Family Provostial Professor

    BioJonathan Berger is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford University, where he teaches composition, music theory, and cognition at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).
    Jonathan is a 2017 Guggenheim Fellow and a 2016 winner of the Rome Prize.
    He was the founding co-director of the Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SICA, now the Stanford Arts Institute) and founding director of Yale University’s Center for Studies in Music Technology
    Described as “gripping” by both the New York Times and the Chicago Tribune, “poignant”, “richly evocative” (San Francisco Chronicle), “taut, and hauntingly beautiful” (NY Times), Jonathan Berger’s recent works deal with both consciousness and conscience. The Kronos Quartet toured recent monodrama, My Lai internationally. Thrice commissioned by The National Endowment for the Arts, Berger’a recent commissions include The Mellon and Rockefeller Foundations, Chamber Music Society, Lincoln Center, and Chamber Music America. Upcoming commissions include an oratorio entitled The Ritual of Breath, and Leonardo, for baritone and chamber orchestra.
    In addition to composition, Berger is an active researcher with over 80 publications in a wide range of fields relating to music, science and technology and has held research grants from DARPA, the Wallenberg Foundation, The National Academy of Sciences, the Keck Foundation, and others.

  • Terry Berlier

    Terry Berlier

    Associate Professor of Art and Art History

    Bio“Terry Berlier makes conceptual art of unusual intelligence, humor and sensitivity to the impact of materials.”
    —Kenneth Baker, San Francisco Chronicle

    Terry Berlier is an interdisciplinary artist who investigates the evolution of human interaction with the natural world, queerness, and ecologies. This results in sculptures that are kinetic and sound based, and multi-media installations. She emphasizes the essential roles played by history, cultural memories, and environmental conditions in the creation of our identities. Using humor, she provides tools for recovering and reanimating our faltering connections with self, queerness, nature, and society. Interweaving movement, sound, and interaction as a metaphor for both harmonious and dissonant interactions, Berlier acts as an archaeologist excavating material objects to challenge our understanding of progress and reveal how history is constructed within a cultural landscape.

    Berlier has exhibited in solo and group shows both nationally and internationally including the Yerba Buena Center for Arts, Contemporary Jewish Museum of San Francisco, Catherine Clark Gallery, Southern Exposure, San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, Thomas Welton Stanford Art Gallery at Stanford University, Montalvo Arts Center, Weston Art Gallery, Babel Gallery in Norway, Richard L. Nelson Gallery, Center for Contemporary Art in Sacramento, Kala Art Institute Gallery, San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, Natural Balance in Girona Spain and FemArt Mostra D’Art De Dones in Barcelona Spain. She has received numerous residencies and grants including the Center for Cultural Innovation Grant, the Zellerbach Foundation Berkeley, Artist in Residence at Montalvo Arts Center, Arts Council Silicon Valley Artist Fellowship, Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research Fellow at Stanford University, Recology San Francisco, Hungarian Multicultural Center in Budapest Hungary, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception in San Francisco, California Council for Humanities California Stories Fund and the Millay Colony for Artists. Her work has been reviewed in the BBC News Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle and in the book ‘Seeing Gertrude Stein’ published by University of California Press. Her work is in several collections including the Progressive Corporation in Cleveland Ohio, Kala Art Institute in Berkeley California and Bildwechsel Archive in Berlin Germany.

    She received a Masters in Fine Arts in Studio Art from University of California, Davis and a Bachelors of Fine Arts from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Terry Berlier is an Associate Professor and Director of the Sculpture Lab and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University where she has taught since 2007.

  • Russell Berman

    Russell Berman

    Walter A. Haas Prof in the Humanities, Professor of Comparative Literature and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    BioProfessor Berman joined the Stanford faculty in 1979. In 1982-83 he was a Mellon Faculty Fellow in the Humanities at Harvard, and in 1988-89 he held an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship in Berlin. In 1997 he was awarded the Bundesverdienstkreuz of the Federal Republic of Germany. He has directed several National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminars for College Teachers. At Stanford, he has served in several administrative offices, including Chair of German Studies, Chair of Comparative Literature, Director of the Overseas Studies Program, and currently Director of Stanford Introductory Studies. In 2011 he served as President of the Modern Language Association. Professor Berman is the editor of the quarterly journal Telos

  • Michael Bernstein

    Michael Bernstein

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioMichael Bernstein is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and STMicroelectronics Faculty Scholar at Stanford University, where he is a member of the Human-Computer Interaction group. His research focuses on the design of social computing and crowdsourcing systems. Michael has received eight best paper awards at premier computing venues, and he has been recognized with an NSF CAREER award and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship. His Ph.D. students have gone on both to industry (e.g., Adobe Research, Facebook Data Science, entrepreneurship) and faculty careers (e.g., Carnegie Mellon, UC Berkeley). Michael holds a bachelor's degree in Symbolic Systems from Stanford University, as well as a master's degree and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT.

  • Lisa Blaydes

    Lisa Blaydes

    Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioLisa Blaydes is Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. She is the author of Elections and Distributive Politics in Mubarak’s Egypt (Cambridge University Press, 2011) and State of Repression: Iraq under Saddam Hussein (Princeton University Press, 2018). Her articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, Governance, International Studies Quarterly, International Organization, Journal of Theoretical Politics, Middle East Journal, Studies in Comparative International Development and World Politics. During the 2008-9 and 2009-2010 academic years, Professor Blaydes was an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. During the 2015-16 academic year, she was a Fellow at the Center for Advance Study in the Behavior Sciences. She holds degrees in Political Science (PhD) from the University of California, Los Angeles and International Relations (BA, MA) from Johns Hopkins University.

  • Jasmina Bojic

    Jasmina Bojic

    Lecturer
    Camera as Witness Director, Stanford Arts Office Programs

    BioJasmina Bojic
    Lecturer in International Relations, Director of the Camera As Witness Program, Stanford Arts and Founder and Executive Director of the United Nations Association Film Festival

    Jasmina Bojic has taught at Stanford University for last twenty-five years. She has been working as a journalist more than thirty years, covering many political and cultural events. She has worked as a producer/director on several documentaries and TV Programs dealing with human rights issues. 23 years ago Jasmina conceptualized and organized one of the oldest international documentary film festivals in the US – UNAFF (United Nations Association Film Festival) at Stanford University. Jasmina is Founder and Director of the CAMERA AS WITNESS program which extends the educational use of UNAFF documentaries throughout the academic year at Stanford. Jasmina received the “Community Treasure Award” from Stanford University President John Hennessy for her contribution in promoting dialogue and education about different cultures and issues. In 2014 the ICFT (International Council for Film, Television and Audiovisual Communication of UNESCO) presented the UNESCO Fellini Medal to Jasmina in recognition of her exceptional contribution in promoting the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights through the art of documentary film.

  • Eavan Casey

    Eavan Casey

    BioEavan Boland is Irish. She has been writer in residence at Trinity College and University College Dublin. She was poet in residence at the National Maternity Hospital during its 1994 Centenary. She has also been the Hurst Professor at Washington University and Regent's Lecturer at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She is on the board of the Irish Arts Council and a member of the Irish Academy of Letters. She is on the advisory board of the International Writers Center at Washington University. She has published ten volumes of poetry, the most recent being New Collected Poems (2008) and Domestic Violence (2007) and An Origin Like Water: Collected Poems 1967-87 (1996) with W.W. Norton. She has received the Lannan Award for Poetry and an American Ireland Fund Literary Award. She has published two volumes of prose: Object Lessons: The Life of the Woman and the Poet in Our Time and A Journey with Two Maps: Becoming a Woman Poet which won a 2012 PEN Award for creative nonfiction.

  • Touria Boumehdi

    Touria Boumehdi

    Lecturer

    BioDr. Touria Boumehdi Tomasi serves on the faculty of the Language Center at Stanford University. She teaches all levels of undergraduate and graduate courses in Modern Standard Arabic and Spanish, including accelerated and intensive offerings. Also, in Spring 2016, she will teach a new course in the Department of Languages Cultures and Literatures (DLCL), “Aljamía language and literature through the study and analyze of aljamiado manuscripts.”
    With over 31 years of professional and academic experiences, Dr. Boumehdi has worked as Co-Director of the Spanish Department at the University of Rabat and Professor of Spanish and Arabic in Spain and France at the University of Toulouse le Mirail, the Toulouse School of Business, IAAE Oviedo and ECLAP Valladolid. She completed her Doctorate with a joint Ph.D. and highest honors in Spanish and Arabic at the University of Toulouse, a Master’s degree in Spanish Language and Literature at the University of Mohammed V in Rabat, and an In-Depth Studies Diploma (DEA) including five post-undergraduate years of study in Oriental Languages, Literature, and Civilizations from the University of Paris III in New Sorbonne. Dr. Boumehdi also holds an MBA in International Marketing and Commerce from E S C Toulouse School of Business and hold 6 years experiences as a Export Manager in 3 French technology firms.
    Included among her recent book and other publications are several articles and her doctoral dissertation published in Spain in 2012 on the topic of Aljamiado (15th and 16th century Spanish manuscripts written in Arabic) language and literature.
    Dr. Boumehdi has been teaching at Stanford since July 2012 where she is a certified ACTFL OPI and WPT Tester of Arabic.

  • Vivian Brates

    Vivian Brates

    Lecturer

    BioVivian Brates is originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina, where she attended the University of Buenos Aires. She received an M. A. degree from Georgetown University in Latin American Studies, with a focus on Economic Development, and previously an M. A. degree from UC Santa Barbara in Spanish and Latin American Literature. She worked for several years as a Human Rights Observer and Election Monitor with the United Nations and the OAS in Haiti, Dominican Republic, Venezuela, and Guatemala, as well as an advocate and lobbyist in Washington DC. She has worked at Stanford since 2005, and also has volunteered for the Prison University Project teaching Spanish at San Quentin Prison, the International Institute of the Bay Area preparing immigrants for the US citizenship exam, and at the Dilley Pro Bono Project in Texas and Al Otro Lado in Tijuana, Mexico, helping asylum seekers articulate their fear of return claims. She has focused on developing meaningful partnerships with some of these organizations to offer students real-life experiences with Spanish-speaking communities to raise awareness about other cultures (and their own), grow their intercultural skills, and develop identities as engaged citizens.

  • William Brewer

    William Brewer

    Lecturer

    BioWilliam Brewer is the author of I Know Your Kind (Milkweed Editions, 2017), a winner of the 2016 National Poetry Series, and Oxyana, selected for a 2016 Poetry Society of America's Chapbook Fellowship. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in American Poetry Review, The Nation, New England Review, The New Yorker, A Public Space, The Sewanee Review, and other journals. Formerly a Stegner Fellow, he is currently a Jones Lecturer at Stanford University.

  • Jennifer DeVere Brody

    Jennifer DeVere Brody

    Professor of Theater and Performance Studies

    BioJennifer DeVere Brody graduated with a B.A. in Victorian Studies from Vassar College and did her graduate work in English and American Literature at the University of Pennsylvania which awarded her the Thurgood Marshall Prize for Academics and Community Service. Her scholary essays have appeared in Theatre Journal, Signs, Genders, Callaloo, Screen, Text and Performance Quarterly and in numerous edited volumes. Her books, Impossible Purities: Blackness, Femininity and Victorian Culture (Duke University Press, 1998) and Punctuation: Art, Politics and Play (Duke University Press, 2008) both discuss relations among and between sexuality, gender, racailization, visual studies and performance. She has served as the President of the Women and Theatre Program, on the board of Women and Performance and has worked with the Ford and Mellon Foundations. She received that Monette-Horwitz Prize for Independent Research Against Homophobia. She co-produced “The Theme is Blackness” festival of black plays in Durham, NC when she taught in African American Studies at Duke University. Her research and teaching focus on performance, aesthetics, politics and subjectivity as well as feminist theory, queer studies and contemporary cultural studies. Currently, she with Prof. Nicholas Boggs on the re-publication of James Baldwin’s illustrated book, Little Man, Little Man and is writing a new book about the intersections of sculpture and performance. She held the Weinberg College of Board of Visitors Professorship at Northwestern University.

  • Michaela Bronstein

    Michaela Bronstein

    Assistant Professor of English
    On Leave from 09/01/2020 To 08/31/2021

    BioWelcome! For current information about me, try my personal website (http://www.michaelabronstein.com/) or my Stanford English page (https://english.stanford.edu/people/michaela-bronstein).

  • Scott Bukatman

    Scott Bukatman

    Professor of Art and Art History

    BioScott Bukatman is a cultural theorist and Professor of Film and Media Studies at Stanford University. His research explores how such popular media as film, comics, and animation mediate between new technologies and human perceptual and bodily experience. His books include Terminal Identity: The Virtual Subject in Postmodern Science Fiction, one of the earliest book-length studies of cyberculture; a monograph on the film Blade Runner commissioned by the British Film Institute; and a collection of essays, Matters of Gravity: Special Effects and Supermen in the 20th Century. The Poetics of Slumberland: Animated Spirits and the Animating Spirit, celebrates play, plasmatic possibility, and the life of images in cartoons, comics, and cinema. Bukatman has been published in abundant journals and anthologies, including October, Critical Inquiry, Camera Obscura, and Science Fiction Studies.

    His most recent book, Hellboy's World: Comics and Monsters on the Margins shows how our engagement with Mike Mignola's Hellboy comics also a highly aestheticized encounter with the medium of comics and the materiality of the book. Scott Bukatman’s dynamic study explores how comics produce a heightened “adventure of reading” in which syntheses of image and word, image sequences, and serial narratives create compelling worlds for the reader’s imagination to inhabit.

  • Marshall Burke

    Marshall Burke

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMarshall Burke is an associate professor in the Department of Earth System Science, deputy director at the Center on Food Security and the Environment, and center fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University. He is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a co-founder of AtlasAI, a remote sensing start-up. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change and on measuring and understanding economic development in emerging markets. His work has appeared in both economic and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA in international relations from Stanford University.

    Prospective students should see my personal webpage, linked at right.

  • Jennifer Burns

    Jennifer Burns

    Associate Professor of History
    On Leave from 10/01/2020 To 12/31/2020

    BioI am a historian of the twentieth century United States working at the intersection of intellectual, political, and cultural history, with a particular interest in ideas about the state, markets, and capitalism and how these play out in policy and politics.

    My first book, Goddess of the Market: Ayn Rand and the American Right (Oxford, 2009), was an intellectual biography of the libertarian novelist Ayn Rand. For more on this book, watch my interviews with Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, or check out my website (www.jenniferburns.org). I am currently writing a book about the economist Milton Friedman.

    At Stanford, I’ve been involved in a number of new initiatives, including serving as a faculty advisor to the Approaches to Capitalism Workshop at the Stanford Humanities Center, co-founding the Bay Area Consortium for the History of Ideas in America (BACHIA), and convening the Hoover Institution Library and Archives Workshop on Political Economy.

    I teach courses on modern U.S. history, religious history, and the intellectual history of capitalism.

    My writing on the history of conservatism, libertarianism, and liberalism has appeared in a number of academic and popular journals, including Reviews in American History, Modern Intellectual History, Journal of Cultural Economy, The New York Times, The New Republic, and Dissent.

    Prospective graduate students: please consult my history department webpage for more information on graduate study. https://history.stanford.edu/people/jennifer-burns

  • Thomas Byers

    Thomas Byers

    Entrepreneurship Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioAt Stanford University since 1995, Professor Tom Byers focuses on education regarding high-growth entrepreneurship and technology innovation. He is the first holder of the Entrepreneurship Professorship endowed chair in the School of Engineering and also a Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. He has been a faculty director since the inception of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP), which serves as the entrepreneurship center for the School of Engineering. His current activities at STVP include its Principled Entrepreneurial Action and Knowledge (PEAK) project, its Mayfield Fellows work/study program in entrepreneurial leadership, and its Stanford eCorner collection of thought leader videos and podcasts. He was the director and PI of the Epicenter, funded by the National Science Foundation to stimulate entrepreneurship education at all US engineering and science colleges. Tom is a co-author of the Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise textbook from McGraw-Hill, now in its 5th edition.

    Tom is a Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professor at UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke University. He has been a recipient of the prestigious Gordon Prize by the National Academy of Engineering in the USA and Stanford University's Gores Award, which is its highest honor for excellence in teaching. He is a member of the board of trustees at Menlo College and advisory boards at Harvard Business School and Conservation International. Tom was executive vice president and general manager of Symantec Corporation during its formation, and started his career at Accenture. Tom holds a BS in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research and an MBA from UC Berkeley. He also earned a PhD in Business Administration (Management Science) at UC Berkeley.

  • Bruce Cahan

    Bruce Cahan

    Lecturer

    BioBruce Cahan is a Lecturer in Stanford University's Management Science and Engineering Department, a Distinguished Scholar at Stanford's Human-Sciences and Technologies Advanced Research Institute's mediaX Program, and an active member of CodeX Fellow at Stanford’s Center for Legal Informatics. Bruce's course offerings at Stanford include Ethics of Finance and Financial Engineering (MS&E 148), Investing on the Buy Side of Wall Street (MS&E 449), Sustainable Banking (CEE 244A) and Redesigning Post-Disaster Finance (d.school pop out).. As an Ashoka Fellow through Urban Logic, Bruce is creating the Space Commodities Exchange, GoodBank™(IO), an independent teaching bank for high-transparency, impacts-aware commercial bankers, and other projects.

  • Bruce Cain

    Bruce Cain

    Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioBruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

  • Kai Carlson-Wee

    Kai Carlson-Wee

    Lecturer

    BioKai Carlson-Wee is the author of RAIL (BOA Editions, 2018). He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and his work has appeared in Ploughshares, Best New Poets, AGNI, New England Review, Gulf Coast, and The Missouri Review, which awarded him the 2013 Editor’s Prize. His photography has been featured in Narrative Magazine, and his poetry film, Riding the Highline, received the Jury Award at the 2015 Napa Valley Film Festival. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he lives in San Francisco and is a lecturer at Stanford University.

  • Martin Carnoy

    Martin Carnoy

    Vida Jacks Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearching econometric models of quality of education in Latin America and Southern Africa. Studying changes in university financing and the quality of engineering and science tertiary education in China, India, and Russia.

  • Steven Carter

    Steven Carter

    Yamato Ichihashi Chair in Japanese History and Civilization, Emeritus

    BioResearch Areas:
    - Japanese Poetry, Poetics, and Poetic Culture
    - The Japanese Essay (zuihitsu)
    - Travel Writing
    - Historical Fiction
    - The Relationship between the Social and the Aesthetic

  • Terry Castle

    Terry Castle

    Walter A. Haas Professor in the Humanities
    On Partial Leave from 09/01/2020 To 03/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCompleting introductory essay for my book on the "Not-A-Woman"
    Editing classic 1950s lesbian novel, The Price of Salt, by Patricia Highsmith

  • Chris Chafe

    Chris Chafe

    Duca Family Professor

    BioChris Chafe is a composer, improvisor, and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). In 2019, he was International Visiting Research Scholar at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies The University of British Columbia, Visiting Professor at the Politecnico di Torino, and Edgard-Varèse Guest Professor at the Technical University of Berlin. At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he has pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's jacktrip project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in sometimes novel venues. An early network project was a simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe’s works include gallery and museum music installations which are now into their second decade with “musifications” resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD’s. Recent work includes the Earth Symphony, the Brain Stethoscope project (Gnosisong), PolarTide for the 2013 Venice Biennale, Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland.

  • Enrique Chagoya

    Enrique Chagoya

    Professor of Art and Art History

    BioDrawing from his experiences living on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border in the late 70’s, and also in Europe in the late 90’s, Enrique Chagoya juxtaposes secular, popular, and religious symbols in order to address the ongoing cultural clash between the United States, Latin America and the world as well. He uses familiar pop icons to create deceptively friendly points of entry for the discussion of complex issues. Through these seemingly harmless characters Chagoya examines the recurring subject of colonialism and oppression that continues to riddle contemporary American foreign policy.

    Chagoya was born and raised in Mexico City. His father, a bank employee by day and artist by night, encouraged his interest in art by teaching Chagoya color theory and how to sketch at a very early age. As a young adult, Chagoya enrolled in the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, where he studied political economy and contributed political cartoons to union newsletters. He relocated to Veracruz and directed a team focused on rural-development projects, a time he describes as “an incredible growing experience…[that] made me form strong views on what was happening outside in the world.” This growing political awareness would later surface in Chagoya’s art. At age 26, Chagoya moved to Berkeley, California and began working as a free-lance illustrator and graphic designer. Disheartened by what he considered to be the narrow political scope of economics programs in local colleges, Chagoya turned his interests to art. He enrolled in the San Francisco Art Institute, where he earned a BFA in printmaking in 1984. He then pursued his MA and MFA at the University of California, Berkeley, graduating in 1987. He moved to San Francisco in 1995. He has been exhibitng his work nationally and internationally for over two decades with a major retrospective organized by the Des Moines Art Center in Iowa in 2007 that traveled to UC Berkelye Art Museum and to the Palms Spring Art Museum in 2008 ( fully illustrated bilingual catalog was published). In the Fall of 2013, a major survey of his work opened at Centro Museum ARTIUM, in Vitoria-Gasteiz, capital city of the Basque Country, near Bilbao, Spain (with a trilingual catalog documenting the exhibition). The exhibition will travel to the CAAM in the Canary Islands in 2015.

    He is currently Full Professor at Stanford University’s department of Art and Art History and his work can be found in many public collections including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Metropolitan museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco among others. He has been recipient of numerous awards such as two NEA artists fellowships, one more from the National Academy of Arts and Letters in New York, residencies at Giverny and Cite Internationale des Arts in France, and a Tiffany fellowship to mention a few.

    He is represented by Gallery Paule Anglim in San Francisco, George Adams Gallery in New York, and Lisa Sette Gallery in Scottsdale, AZ. His prints are published by Shark’s Ink in Lyons, Co, Electric Works in San Francisco, CA, Magnolia Editions in Oakland, CA, ULAE Bay Shore, NY, Segura Publishing in Pueblo, AZ, Trillium press in Brisbaine, CA, Made in California in Oakland, CA, and Smith Andersen Editions in Palo Alto, CA.

  • Page Chamberlain

    Page Chamberlain

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I use stable and radiogenic isotopes to understand Earth system history. These studies examine the link between climate, tectonics, biological, and surface processes. Projects include: 1) examining the terrestrial climate history of the Earth focusing on periods of time in the past that had CO 2-levels similar to the present and to future projections; and 2) addressing how the chemical weathering of the Earth's crust affects both the long- and short-term carbon cycle. Field areas for these studies are in the Cascades, Rocky Mountains, Sierra Nevada, the European Alps, Tibet and the Himalaya and the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

    International Collaborations
    Much of the research that I do has an international component. Specifically, I have collaborations with: 1) the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Center in Frankfurt Germany as a Humboldt Fellow and 2) the Chinese University of Geosciences in Bejiing China where I collaborate with Professor Yuan Gao.

    Teaching
    I teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in isotope biogeochemistry, Earth system history, and the relationship between climate, surface processes and tectonics.

    Professional Activities
    Editor American Journal of Science; Co-Director Stanford Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory (present);Chair, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences (2004-07); Co-Director Stanford/USGS SHRIMP Ion microprobe facility (2001-04)

  • Gordon Chang

    Gordon Chang

    Senior Associate Vice Provost for Under Graduate Education and the Olive H. Palmer Professor in Humanities

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI co-direct an international project that seeks to recover the history of Chinese railroad workers in North America.

  • Angele Christin

    Angele Christin

    Assistant Professor of Communication and, by courtesy, of Sociology
    On Leave from 10/01/2020 To 06/30/2021

    BioAngèle Christin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication, and, by courtesy, in the Sociology Department at Stanford University. She studies fields and organizations where algorithms and ‘big data’ analytics transform professional values, expertise, and work practices. She received her PhD in Sociology from Princeton University and the EHESS (Paris).

  • Eve Clark

    Eve Clark

    Richard Lyman Professor in the Humanities, Emerita

    BioI am interested in first language acquisition, the acquisition of meaning, acquisitional principles in word-formation compared across children and languages, and general semantic and pragmatic issues in the lexicon and in language use. I am currently working on the kinds of pragmatic information adults offer small children as they talk to them, and on children's ability to make use of this information as they make inferences about unfamiliar meanings and about the relations between familiar and unfamiliar words. I am interested in the inferences children make about where to 'place' unfamiliar words, how they identify the relevant semantic domains, and what they can learn about conventional ways to say things based on adult responses to child errors during acquisition. All of these 'activities' involve children and adults placing information in common ground as they interact. Another current interest of mine is the construction of verb paradigms: how do children go from using a single verb form to using forms that contrast in meaning -- on such dimensions as person, number, and tense? How do they learn to distinguish the meanings of homophones? To what extent do they make use of adult input to discern the underlying structure of the system? And how does conversation with more expert speakers (usually adults) foster the acquisition of a first language? I am particularly interested in the general role of practice along with feedback here.

  • Herbert Clark

    Herbert Clark

    Albert Ray Lang Professor of Psychology, Emeritus

    BioFrom Wikipedia:

    "Herbert H. Clark (Herb Clark) is a psycholinguist currently serving as Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. His focuses include cognitive and social processes in language use; interactive processes in conversation, from low-level disfluencies through acts of speaking and understanding to the emergence of discourse; and word meaning and word use. Clark is known for his theory of "common ground": individuals engaged in conversation must share knowledge in order to be understood and have a meaningful conversation (Clark, 1985). Together with Deanna Wilkes-Gibbs (1986), he also developed the collaborative model, a theory for explaining how people in conversation coordinate with one another to determine definite references. Clark's books include Semantics and Comprehension, Psychology and Language: An Introduction to Psycholinguistics, Arenas of Language Use and Using Language."

  • David Cohen

    David Cohen

    WSD-HANDA Professor in Human Rights and International Justice

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research includes book projects on World War II war crimes trials; the Tokyo and Nuremberg International Military Tribunals; analysis of blasphemy prosecutions in Indonesia; analysis of the misuse of electronic communication, criminal defamation, lese majeste, blasphemy and asspociated laws in Southeast Asia; international best practices on whistleblower protection and justiuce collaborators in corruption cases in ASEAN; the UN justice process in East Timor under the Special Panels for Serious Crimes; comparative study of strategic decision making in American, British, and Japanese policy circles in WWII; analysis of the Judgment in Case 002/2 at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal in Cambodia.

  • Maria Comsa

    Maria Comsa

    Lecturer

    BioMaria Teodora received her PhD in French from Stanford University. Her research interests include second-language acquisition, 18th-century French theater, French cinema, and digital humanities.

  • Irene Corso

    Irene Corso

    Lecturer, Stanford Language Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests involve doctor-patient relationship and communication strategies as they pertain to (1) the development and instruction of medical Spanish curriculum, (2) satisfaction in health care delivery with emphasis on cross cultural competency issues, and (3) the effectiveness of interpretive systems in health care settings.

  • Gretchen C. Daily

    Gretchen C. Daily

    Bing Professor in Environmental Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLand use, biodiversity dynamics, ecosystem services

  • Richard Dasher

    Richard Dasher

    Adjunct Professor

    BioRichard Dasher has been Director of the US-Asia Technology Management Center at Stanford University since 1994. He served concurrently as the Executive Director of the Center for Integrated Systems in Stanford's School of Engineering from 1998 - 2015. His research and teaching focus on the flow of people, knowledge, and capital in innovation systems, on the impact of new technologies on industry value chains, and on open innovation management. Dr. Dasher serves on the advisory boards for national universities and research institutions in Japan and Thailand. He is on the selection and review committees of major government funding programs for science, technology, and innovation and in Canada and Japan. He is an advisor to start-up companies, business accelerators, venture capital firms, and nonprofits in Silicon Valley, China, Japan, and S. Korea. Dr. Dasher was the first non-Japanese person ever asked to join the governance of a Japanese national university, serving as a Board Director and member of the Management Council of Tohoku University from 2004 - 2010. Dr. Dasher received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Linguistics from Stanford University. From 1986 – 90, he was Director of the U.S. State Department’s Advanced Language and Area Training Centers in Japan and Korea that provide full-time curricula to U.S. and Commonwealth Country diplomats assigned to those countries.

  • Adrian Daub

    Adrian Daub

    Professor of German Studies and of Comparative Literature

    BioMy research focuses on the long nineteenth century, in particular the intersection of literature, music and philosophy. My first book, "Zwillingshafte Gebärden": Zur kulturellen Wahrnehmung des vierhändigen Klavierspiels im neunzehnten Jahrhundert (Königshausen & Neumann, 2009), traces four-hand piano playing as both a cultural practice and a motif in literature, art and philosophy (an English edition of the book recently appeared as Four-Handed Monsters: Four-Hand Piano Playing and Nineteenth-Century Culture (Oxford University Press, 2014)). My second book Uncivil Unions - The Metaphysics of Marriage in German Idealism and Romanticism (University of Chicago Press, 2012), explored German philosophical theories of marriage from Kant to Nietzsche. My book Tristan's Shadow - Sexuality and the Total Work of Art (University of Chicago Press, 2013) deals with eroticism in German opera after Wagner. In 2015 I published The James Bond Songs: Pop Anthems of late Capitalism (Oxford University Press), which I co-wrote with Charles Kronengold. In 2016 I published a German-language book of essays entitled Pop-Up Nation (Hanser). I am a frequent contributor to periodicals and newspapers in the United States, Germany and Switzerland. My current book project will trace the fate of the dynasty in the age of the nuclear family. In addition, I have published articles on topics such as fin-de-siècle German opera, the films of Hans-Jürgen Syberberg, literature and scandal, the cultural use of ballads in the nineteenth century, and writers like Novalis, Stefan George, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno and W.G. Sebald.

  • James Daughton

    James Daughton

    Associate Professor of History and, by courtesy, of French and Italian

    BioI am an historian of modern Europe and European imperialism with a particular interest in political, cultural, and social history, as well as the history of humanitarianism.

    My first book, An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism, and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880-1914 (Oxford University Press, 2006) tells the story of how troubled relations between Catholic missionaries and a host of republican critics shaped colonial policies, Catholic perspectives, and domestic French politics in the decades before the First World War. Based on archival research from four continents, the book challenges the long-held view that French colonizing and “civilizing” goals were the product of a distinctly secular republican ideology built on Enlightenment ideals. By exploring the experiences of religious workers, one of the largest groups of French men and women working abroad, the book argues that many “civilizing” policies were wrought in the fires of discord between missionaries and anti-clerical republicans – discord that indigenous communities exploited in responding to colonial rule.

    My current project, entitled Humanity So Far Away: Violence, Suffering, and Humanitarianism in the Modern French Empire, places the successes and failures of colonial “civilizing” projects within the broader context of the development of European sensibilities regarding violence, global suffering, and human rights. Based on research in archives on five continents, Humanity So Far Away explores the central role human suffering played as an experience, a moral concept, and a political force in the rise and fall of French imperialism from the late 1800s to the 1960s. The book also considers how colonial practices increasingly intersected with efforts to establish norms of humane behavior – efforts most often led by non-state and international bodies, especially the League of Nations and the International Labor Organization. Drawing on the methods of political, cultural, and intellectual history, my research ultimately aims to explore concretely the extent to which notions about empathy and humanitarianism spread (or failed to spread) from Europe to the outermost reaches of the globe in the twentieth century.

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Davis’ research and teaching deals broadly with the role that water and sanitation services play in promoting public health and economic development, with particular emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Her group conducts applied research that utilizes theory and analytical methods from public and environmental health, engineering, microeconomics, and planning. They have conducted field research in more than 20 countries, most recently including Zambia, Bangladesh, and Kenya.

  • Sik Dennig

    Sik Dennig

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHeritage language learning, discourse analysis, technology in language teaching

  • Shane Denson

    Shane Denson

    Associate Professor of Art and Art History and, by courtesy, of German Studies
    On Leave from 10/01/2020 To 06/30/2021

    BioShane Denson is Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University. His research and teaching interests span a variety of media and historical periods, including phenomenological and media-philosophical approaches to film, digital media, comics, games, and serialized popular forms. He is the author of Postnaturalism: Frankenstein, Film, and the Anthropotechnical Interface (Transcript-Verlag/Columbia University Press, 2014) and co-editor of several collections: Transnational Perspectives on Graphic Narratives (Bloomsbury, 2013), Digital Seriality (special issue of Eludamos: Journal for Computer Game Culture, 2014), and the open-access book Post-Cinema: Theorizing 21st-Century Film (REFRAME Books, 2016). His next book, Discorrelated Images, is forthcoming with Duke University Press.

    See also shanedenson.com for more info.

  • Persi Diaconis

    Persi Diaconis

    Mary V. Sunseri Professor and Professor of Mathematics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests:
    PROBABILITY THEORY
    BAYESIAN STATISTICS
    STATISTICAL COMPUTING
    COMBINATORICS

  • Larry Diamond

    Larry Diamond

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsdemocratic development and regime change; U.S. foreign policy affecting democracy abroad; comparative trends in the quality and stability of democracy in developing countries and postcommunist states; and public opinion in new democracies, especially in East Asia

  • Alberto Diaz-Cayeros

    Alberto Diaz-Cayeros

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComparative Politics, Political Economy, International Political Economy, Poverty, Rule of Law, Political Party Development

  • David Dill

    David Dill

    Donald E. Knuth Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSecure and reliable blockchain technology at Facebook.

  • Rodolfo Dirzo

    Rodolfo Dirzo

    Bing Prof in Environmental Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEcological and evolutionary aspects of plant-animal interactions, largely but not exclusively, in tropical forest ecosystems.
    Conservation biology in tropical ecosystems.
    Studies on biodiversity.
    Education, at all levels, on scientific practice, ecology and biodiversity conservation.

  • Rob Dunbar

    Rob Dunbar

    W.M. Keck Professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOcean processes, biogeochemistry, climatology/paleoclimatology, isotopic chemistry, ocean policy

  • Jean-Pierre Dupuy

    Jean-Pierre Dupuy

    Professor of French and Italian and, by courtesy, of Political Science

    BioProfessor Jean-Pierre Dupuy is a Professor of Social and Political Philosophy at the École Polytechnique, Paris. He is the Director of research at the C.N.R.S. (Philosophy) and the Director of C.R.E.A. (Centre de Recherche en Épistémologie Appliquée), the philosophical research group of the École Polytechnique, which he founded in 1982. At Stanford University, he is a researcher at the Study of Language and Information (C.S.L.I.) Professor Dupuy is by courtesy a Professor of Political Science.

    In his book The Mechanization of the Mind, Jean-Pierre Dupuy explains how the founders of cybernetics laid the foundations not only for cognitive science, but also artificial intelligence, and foreshadowed the development of chaos theory, complexity theory, and other scientific and philosophical breakthroughs.

  • William Durham

    William Durham

    Bing Professor in Human Biology, Emeritus

    BioWilliam (Bill) Durham is Bing Professor in Human Biology, Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and a Senior Fellow in the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford. He has taught in Human Biology and Anthropology at Stanford since 1977, when he came from the Society of Fellows at the University of Michigan.

    Today, Bill's main interests are environmental anthropology, the “coevolution” of genetic and cultural change in human populations, and the challenges of sustainable development in the tropics, especially Galapagos, Peru, and Costa Rica. Along with Stanford Professor Rodolfo Dirzo, Bill is co-director of the Osa-Golfito Initiative (INOGO) in the Woods Institute, working with Costa Ricans to develop a sustainability strategy for the southern region of the country.

    Bill’s publications include the books Scarcity and Survival in Central America (Stanford Press 1979; and in Spanish, by UCA Editores 1988), Coevolution: Genes, Culture, and Human Diversity (Stanford Press, 1991), The Social Causes of Environmental Destruction in Latin America (U. of Michigan Press, 1995, with M. Painter), Inbreeding, Incest and the Incest Taboo (Stanford Press 2004, with A. Wolf), and Ecotourism and Conservation in the Americas (CABI, 2008, with A. Stronza). In addition, he served as Editor in Chief for 16 volumes of the Annual Review of Anthropology between 1992 and 2008.

    A recipient of the MacArthur Prize Fellowship, Bill has also received five awards for teaching and faculty leadership at Stanford. He was Founding Co-Director of the Center for Responsible Travel (CREST), a research organization that views tourism as a means to promote local livelihoods and environmental conservation. He has led more than 25 Stanford Alumni Association trips to Galapagos, the Amazon, East Africa, and elsewhere.

  • David Eagleman

    David Eagleman

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioDavid Eagleman is a neuroscientist, bestselling author, and Guggenheim Fellow. Dr. Eagleman’s areas of research include sensory substitution, time perception, vision, and synesthesia. He also studies the intersection of neuroscience with the legal system, and in that capacity he directs the non-profit Center for Science and Law. Eagleman is the writer and presenter of The Brain, an Emmy-nominated television series on PBS and BBC. He is the author of many books, including The Runaway Species, The Brain, Incognito, and Wednesday is Indigo Blue. He is also the author of a widely adopted textbook on cognitive neuroscience, Brain and Behavior. He has also written a bestselling book of literary fiction, Sum, which has been translated into 32 languages, turned into two operas, and named a Best Book of the Year by Barnes and Noble. Dr. Eagleman has been a TED speaker, a guest on the Colbert Report, and profiled in the New Yorker magazine. He has launched several neuroscience companies from his research, including BrainCheck and NeoSensory.

  • Paulla Ebron

    Paulla Ebron

    Associate Professor of Anthropology

    BioPaulla Ebron joined the department in 1992. Ebron is the author of Performing Africa, a work based on her research in The Gambia that traces the significance of West African praise-singers in transnational encounters. A second project focuses on tropicality and regionalism as it ties West Africa and the U.S. Georgia Sea Islands in a dialogue about landscape, memory and political uplift. This project is entitled, "Making Tropical Africa in the Georgia Sea Islands."

  • Penelope Eckert

    Penelope Eckert

    Albert Ray Lang Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Cultural and Social Anthropology

    BioThe goal of my research is to understand the social meaning of linguistic variation. In order to do this, I pursue my sociolinguistic work in the context of in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, focusing on the relation between variation, linguistic style, social identity and social practice.

    Gender has been the big misunderstood in studies of sociolinguistic variation - in spite of the fact that some of the most exciting intellectual developments over the past decades have been in theories of gender and sexuality ... so I have been spending a good deal of time working on language and gender as well.

    Since adolescents and preadolescents are the movers and shakers in linguistic change, I concentrate on this age group, and much of my research takes place in schools. The institutional research site has made me think a good deal about learning and education, but particularly about the construction of adolescence in American society.

  • Dan Edelstein

    Dan Edelstein

    William H. Bonsall Professor in French and Professor, by courtesy, of History

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research lies in the fields of intellectual history, political thought, and digital humanities (DH). I recently published a book that explores the history of rights from the Wars of Religion to the Age of Revolutions; I'm currently working on a book that explores the intellectual history of revolution; I have a number of papers on Rousseau's political thought underway; and I continue to work on a number of DH projects.

  • Paul N. Edwards

    Paul N. Edwards

    Director, STS

    BioI'm Director of the Program on Science, Technology & Society (STS) and a William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford.

    I'm also Professor of Information and History (Emeritus) at the University of Michigan, where I worked for almost 20 years in the School of Information, the Dept. of History, and the STS Program. I taught previously at Stanford from 1992-1998 in various capacities, mainly in the Science, Technology & Society Program that I now direct.

    I study the history, politics, and culture of information infrastructures, especially climate knowledge systems. My books include A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (MIT Press, 2010), The Closed World: Computers and the Politics of Discourse in Cold War America (MIT Press, 1996), and Changing the Atmosphere: Expert Knowledge and Environmental Governance (MIT Press, 2001, co-edited with Clark Miller). With Geof Bowker, I'm academic editor of the MIT Press book series Infrastructures.

    I currently serve as one of over 900 lead authors for the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, to be released in 2021.

  • Ronald Egan

    Ronald Egan

    Confucius Institute Professor of Sinology
    On Leave from 09/01/2020 To 08/31/2021

    BioResearch Areas:
    - Chinese Poetry
    - Song dynasty Poetry and literati Culture
    - The social and historical context of Song dynasty aesthetics

  • Karen Eggleston

    Karen Eggleston

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth reform in China; comparative healthcare systems in Asia; government and market roles in the health sector; payment incentives; healthcare productivity; and economic implications of demographic change.

  • Johannes C. Eichstaedt

    Johannes C. Eichstaedt

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use large-scale language analyses and machine learning to characterize disease risk, measure subjective well-being and mental health of populations, and enrich and test psychological theory. I focus on applications of these methods that inform public health and public policy, and to create health systems that are more responsive to mental illness.

  • Keith Ekiss

    Keith Ekiss

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPoetry, Translation, Speculative Literature.