School of Engineering


Showing 101-200 of 672 Results

  • William Chueh

    William Chueh

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioThe availability of low-cost but intermittent renewable electricity (e.g., derived from solar and wind) underscores the grand challenge to store and dispatch energy so that it is available when and where it is needed. Redox-active materials promise the efficient transformation between electrical, chemical, and thermal energy, and are at the heart of carbon-neutral energy cycles. Understanding design rules that govern materials chemistry and architecture holds the key towards rationally optimizing technologies such as batteries, fuel cells, electrolyzers, and novel thermodynamic cycles. Electrochemical and chemical reactions involved in these technologies span diverse length and time scales, ranging from Ångströms to meters and from picoseconds to years. As such, establishing a unified, predictive framework has been a major challenge. The central question unifying our research is: “can we understand and engineer redox reactions at the levels of electrons, ions, molecules, particles and devices using a bottom-up approach?” Our approach integrates novel synthesis, fabrication, characterization, modeling and analytics to understand molecular pathways and interfacial structure, and to bridge fundamentals to energy storage and conversion technologies by establishing new design rules.

  • John M. Cioffi

    John M. Cioffi

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioJohn M. Cioffi teaches Stanford's graduate electrical engineering course sequence in digital communications, part-time as recalled emeritus presently, from 1986 to the present. Cioffi's research interests are in the theory of transmitting the highest possible data rates on a number of different communications channels, many of which efforts spun out of Stanford through he and/or his many former PhD students to companies, most notably including the basic designed globally used 500 million DSL connections. Cioffi also oversaw the prototype developments for the worlds first cable modem and digital-audio broadcast systems. Cioffi pioneering the use of remote management algorithms to improve (over the internet or cloud) both wireline (DSL) and wireless (Wi-Fi) physical-layer transmission performance, an area often known as Dynamic Spectrum Management or Dynamic Line Management. Cioffi is co-inventor on basic patents for vectored DSL transmission and optimized MIMO wireless transmission. In his early career, Cioffi developed the worlds first full-duplex voiceband data modem while at Bell Laboratories, and the worlds first adaptively equalized disk read channel while at IBM. His courses and research projects over the years center on the area of multiuser transmission methods.

  • Bruce Clemens

    Bruce Clemens

    Walter B. Reinhold Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioClemens studies growth and structure of thin film, interface and nanostructured materials for catalytic, electronic and photovoltaic applications. He and his group investigate phase transitions and kinetics in nanostructured materials, and perform nanoparticle engineering for hydrogen storage and catalysis. Recently he and his collaborators have developed nano-portals for efficient injection of hydrogen into storage media, dual-phase nanoparticles for catalysis, amorphous metal electrodes for semiconductor devices, and a lift-off process for forming free-standing, single-crystal films of compound semiconductors.

  • Sigrid Close

    Sigrid Close

    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioProf. Close's research involves space weather detection and modeling for improved spacecraft designs, and advanced signal processing and electromagnetic wave interactions with plasma for ground-to-satellite communication systems. These topics fall under the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) umbrella that include environmental remote sensing using satellite systems and ground-based radar. Her current efforts are the MEDUSSA (Meteoroid, Energetics, and Debris Understanding for Space Situational Awareness) program, which uses dust accelerators to understand the effects of hypervelocity particle impacts on spacecraft along with Particle-In-Cell simulations, and using ground-based radars to characterize the space debris and meteoroid population remotely. She also has active programs in hypersonic plasmas associated with re-entry vehicles.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Shriram Chair of the Department of Bioengineering, Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Todd Coleman

    Todd Coleman

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioTodd P. Coleman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, and by courtesy, Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received B.S. degrees in electrical engineering (summa cum laude), as well as computer engineering (summa cum laude) from the University of Michigan. He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in electrical engineering and computer science. He did postdoctoral studies at MIT and Mass General Hospital in quantitative neuroscience. He previously was a faculty member in the Departments of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the University of California, San Diego, respectively. Dr. Coleman’s research is very multi-disciplinary, using tools from applied probability, physiology, and bioelectronics. Examples include, for instance, optimal transport methods in high-dimensional uncertainty quantification and developing technologies and algorithms to monitor and modulate physiology of the nervous systems in the brain and visceral organs. He has served as a Principal Investigator on grants from the NSF, NIH, Department of Defense, and multiple private foundations. Dr. Coleman is an inventor on 10 granted US patents. He has been selected as a Gilbreth Lecturer for the National Academy of Engineering, a TEDMED speaker, and a Fellow of IEEE as well as the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is currently the Chair of the National Academies Standing Committee on Biotechnology Capabilities and National Security Needs.

  • Steven Hartley Collins

    Steven Hartley Collins

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioSteve Collins is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, where he teaches courses on design and robotics and directs the Stanford Biomechatronics Laboratory. His primary focus is to speed and systematize the design and prescription of prostheses and exoskeletons using versatile device emulator hardware and human-in-the-loop optimization algorithms (Zhang et al. 2017, Science). Another interest is efficient autonomous devices, such as highly energy-efficient walking robots (Collins et al. 2005, Science) and exoskeletons that use no energy yet reduce the metabolic energy cost of human walking (Collins et al. 2015, Nature).

    Prof. Collins received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 from Cornell University, where he performed undergraduate research on passive dynamic walking robots. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 2008 from the University of Michigan, where he performed research on the dynamics and control of human walking. He performed postdoctoral research on humanoid robots at T. U. Delft in the Netherlands. He was a professor of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University for seven years. In 2017, he joined the faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University.

    Prof. Collins is a member of the Scientific Board of Dynamic Walking and the Editorial Board of Science Robotics. He has received the Young Scientist Award from the American Society of Biomechanics, the Best Medical Devices Paper from the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, and the student-voted Professor of the Year in his department.

  • Daniel Norbert Congreve

    Daniel Norbert Congreve

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioDan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Prior to Stanford, Dan received his B.S. and M.S. from Iowa State in 2011, working with Vik Dalal studying defect densities of nano-crystalline and amorphous silicon. He then received his PhD from MIT in Electrical Engineering in 2015, studying under Marc Baldo. His thesis work focused on photonic energy conversion using singlet fission and triplet fusion as a downconverting and upconverting process, respectively. He spent a year as a postdoc with Will Tisdale in Chemical Engineering at MIT studying perovskite nanoplatelets. He joined the Rowland Institute in 2016 as a Rowland Fellow before starting at Stanford in 2020. Dan is a 2019 Moore Inventor Fellow, 2020 Terman Faculty Fellow, and co-founder of Quadratic3D, a startup looking to commercialize 3D printing technologies. His current research interests focus on engineering nanomaterials to solve challenging problems.

  • Richard Cottle

    Richard Cottle

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioRichard W. (Dick) Cottle was born in Chicago in 1934. He received his elementary and high school education in the neighboring village of Oak Park. Dick enrolled at Harvard College to take up political science and premedical studies in order to become a physician (or possibly a foreign service officer if that didn't work out). As it happened, both of these alternatives were abandoned because he was strongly attracted to mathematics and ultimately received his bachelor's degree in that field. He stayed on at Harvard and received the master's degree in mathematics in 1958. This was the Sputnik era, and Dick was moved by a passion to teach secondary-level mathematics. In the first of a series of fateful decisions, he joined the Mathematics Department at the Middlesex School in Concord, Massachusetts where for two years he taught grades 7-12. Midway through this period he married his wife Suzanne (Sue). At this time he began to think of returning to graduate school for a doctorate in mathematics. He decided to study geometry at the University of California at Berkeley and was admitted there. Just before leaving Middlesex, Dick received a telephone call from the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley offering him the part- time job as a computer programmer for which he had applied. Through this job, he became aware of linear and quadratic programming and the contributions of George Dantzig and Philip Wolfe. Before long, Dick left the Rad Lab to join Dantzig's team at the Operations Research Center at UC Berkeley. Under the tutelage of George Dantzig (and the late Edmund Eisenberg), Dick developed a symmetric duality theory and what was then called the "composite problem". These topics along with a reëxamination of the Fritz John conditions, formed the core of his doctoral dissertation. The composite problem involved a fusion of the primal and dual first-order optimality conditions. It was realized that the resulting inequality system could be studied without reference to the primal-dual structure out of which it was born. The name "complementarity problem" was suggested by Dick and introduced in a joint paper with Habetler and Lemke. After Berkeley, Dick's work took two closely related directions. One was the study of quadratic programming; the other was what we now call "linear complementarity". The interesting role played by classes of matrices in both these areas has always held a special fascination for Dick. In quadratic programming, for instance, with Jacques Ferland he obtained characterizations of quasi- and pseudo-convexity of quadratic functions. Dick (and others) were quick to recognize the importance of matrix classes in linear complementarity theory. It was he who proposed the name "copositive-plus" for a matrix class that arose in Lemke's seminal paper of 1965. The name first appeared in the classic paper of Cottle and Dantzig called "Complementary Pivot Theory of Mathematical Programming". The subjects of quadratic programming and linear complementarity (and the associated matrix theory) remain central to his research interests.

  • Markus Covert

    Markus Covert

    Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur focus is on building computational models of complex biological processes, and using them to guide an experimental program. Such an approach leads to a relatively rapid identification and validation of previously unknown components and interactions. Biological systems of interest include metabolic, regulatory and signaling networks as well as cell-cell interactions. Current research involves the dynamic behavior of NF-kappaB, an important family of transcription factors.

  • Craig Criddle

    Craig Criddle

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCriddle's interests include microbial biotechnology for the circular economy, including recovery of clean water from used water, renewable energy, valuable materials that can replace fossil-carbon derived materials. Current projects include energy-efficient anaerobic wastewater treatment technology, assessment of new treatment trains that yield high quality water; fossil carbon plastics biodegradation, and biotechnology for production of bioplastics that can replace fossil carbon plastics.

  • Yi Cui

    Yi Cui

    Director, Precourt Institute for Energy, Fortinet Founders Professor, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, of Photon Science, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    BioCui studies fundamentals and applications of nanomaterials and develops tools for their understanding. Research Interests: nanotechnology, batteries, electrocatalysis, wearables, 2D materials, environmental technology (water, air, soil), cryogenic electron microscopy.

  • Mark Cutkosky

    Mark Cutkosky

    Fletcher Jones Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioCutkosky applies analyses, simulations, and experiments to the design and control of robotic hands, tactile sensors, and devices for human/computer interaction. In manufacturing, his work focuses on design tools for rapid prototyping.

  • Simone D'Amico

    Simone D'Amico

    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    BioSimone D’Amico is Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Politecnico di Milano (2003) and the Ph.D. degree from Delft University of Technology (2010). From 2003 to 2014, he was research scientist and team leader at the German Aerospace Center (DLR). There, he gave key contributions to the design, development, and operations of spacecraft formation-flying and rendezvous missions such as GRACE (United States/Germany), TanDEM-X (Germany), PRISMA (Sweden/Germany/France), and PROBA-3 (ESA). From 2014 to 2020, he was Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. He is the Founding director of the Space Rendezvous Laboratory (SLAB), and Satellite Advisor of the Student Space Initiative (SSSI), Stanford’s largest undergraduate organization. He has over 200 scientific publications and 3000 google scholar’s citations, including conference proceedings, peer-reviewed journal articles, and book chapters. D'Amico's research aims at enabling future miniature distributed space systems for unprecedented science and exploration. His efforts lie at the intersection of advanced astrodynamics, GN&C, and space system engineering to meet the tight requirements posed by these novel space architectures. The most recent mission concepts developed by Dr. D'Amico are a miniaturized distributed occulter/telescope (mDOT) system for direct imaging of exozodiacal dust and exoplanets and the Autonomous Nanosatellite Swarming (ANS) mission for characterization of small celestial bodies. D’Amico’s research is supported by NASA, NSF, AFRL, AFOSR, KACST, and Industry. He is Chairman of the NASA's Starshade Science and Technology Working Group (TSWG). He is member of the advisory board of space startup companies and VC edge funds. He is member of the Space-Flight Mechanics Technical Committee of the AAS, Associate Fellow of AIAA, Associate Editor of the AIAA Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics and the IEEE Transactions of Aerospace and Electronic Systems. He is Fellow of the NAE’s US FOE Symposium. Dr. D’Amico was recipient of the Leonardo 500 Award by the Leonardo Da Vinci Society and ISSNAF (2019), the Stanford’s Introductory Seminar Excellence Award (2019 and 2020), the FAI/NAA‘s Group Diploma of Honor (2018), the Exemplary System Engineering Doctoral Dissertation Award by the International Honor Society for Systems Engineering OAA (2016), the DLR’s Sabbatical/Forschungssemester in honor of scientific achievements (2012), the DLR’s Wissenschaft Preis in honor of scientific achievements (2006), and the NASA’s Group Achievement Award for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, GRACE (2004).

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Eric Darve

    Eric Darve

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Darve's research is focused on the development of numerical methods for high-performance scientific computing, numerical linear algebra, fast algorithms, parallel computing, anomaly detection, and machine learning with applications in engineering.

  • Reinhold Dauskardt

    Reinhold Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • David Davidson

    David Davidson

    Sr Research Engineer, Mechanical Engineering

    BioEducation
    University of Toronto Physics B.S (1978)
    University of Toronto Aerospace Sciences M.Sc. (1980)
    York University Physics Ph.D. (1986)

    Appointment:
    1986-present Senior Research Engineer, Mechanical Engineering Department

    Research Activities:
    Dr. Davidson’s research interests span the fields of gas dynamics and combustion kinetics. During his tenure at Stanford University he has developed a wide array of optical and laser-based diagnostic methods for combustion chemistry and propulsion studies and has advanced the use of these diagnostics in shock tubes. He currently manages the shock tube operations in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratories at Stanford University and actively mentors the approximately two dozen graduate students who use these facilities. He is a co-author of over 200 research publications and has been a member of the editorial advisory board for the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics and secretary of the Western States Section of the Combustion Institute.
    An overview of the shock tube studies performed at Stanford under Prof. Hanson’s and Dr. Davidson’s supervision can be found in the six volumes entitled “Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements” available at http://purl.stanford.edu/kb621cw6967.
    I am sort of retired, but apparently am still working.

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Higgins-Magid Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Davis’ research and teaching deals broadly with the role that water plays in promoting public health and economic development, with particular emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Her group conducts applied research that utilizes theory and analytical methods from public and environmental health, engineering, microeconomics, and planning. They have conducted field research in more than 20 countries, most recently including Zambia, Bangladesh, and Kenya.

  • Adam de la Zerda

    Adam de la Zerda

    Associate Professor of Structural Biology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular imaging technologies for studying cancer biology in vivo

  • Gregory Deierlein

    Gregory Deierlein

    John A. Blume Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioDeierlein's research focuses on improving limit states design of constructed facilities through the development and application of nonlinear structural analysis methods and performance-based design criteria. Recent projects include the development and application of strength and stiffness degrading models to simulate steel and reinforced concrete structures, seismic design and behavior of composite steel-concrete buildings, analysis of inelastic torsional-flexural instability of steel members, and a fracture mechanics investigation of seismically designed welded steel connections.

  • Karl Deisseroth

    Karl Deisseroth

    D. H. Chen Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsKarl Deisseroth's laboratory created and developed optogenetics, hydrogel-tissue chemistry (beginning with CLARITY), and a broad range of enabling methods. He also has employed his technologies to discover the neural cell types and connections that cause adaptive and maladaptive behaviors.

  • Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Director, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance at Stanford, James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Bioengineering, of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and computational approaches to study human movement. Development of biomechanical models to analyze muscle function, study movement abnormalities, design medical products, and guide surgery. Imaging and health technology development. Discovering the principles of peak performance to advance human health. Human performance research. Wearable technologies, video motion capture, and machine learning to enable large-scale analysis.

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioUtkan Demirci is a tenured professor in the School of Medicine at Stanford University and serves as the Interim Division Chief and Director of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection in the Department of Radiology. Prior to Stanford, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and a faculty member of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology division.

    Professor Demirci received his PhD from Stanford University in Electrical Engineering in 2005 and holds M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering, and in Management Science and Engineering. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, 24 book chapters, 7 edited books, and several hundred abstracts and proceedings, as well as having over 25 patents and disclosures pending or granted. He has mentored and trained hundreds of successful scientists, entrepreneurs and academicians and fostered research and industry collaborations around the world. Dr. Demirci was awarded the NSF CAREER Award, and IEEE EMBS Early Career Award. He is currently a fellow of the the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE, 2017), and Distinguished Investigator of the Academy for Radiology and Biomedical Imaging Research and serves as an editorial board member for a number of peer-reviewed journals.

    The BAMM Lab group focuses on developing innovative extracellular vesicle isolation tools, point-of-care technologies and creating microfluidic platforms for early cancer detection with broad applications to multiple diseases including infertility and HIV. Dr. Demirci’s lab has collaborated with over 50 research groups and industry partners around the world. His seminal work in microfluidics has led to the development of innovative FDA-approved platform technologies in medicine and many of his inventions have been industry licensed. He holds several FDA-approved and CE-marked technologies that have been widely used by fertility clinics with assisted reproductive technologies leading to over thousands of live births globally and in the US.

    Dr. Demirci is a serial academic entrepreneur and co-founder of DxNow, Zymot, Levitas Bio, Mercury Biosciences and Koek Biotech and serves as an advisor, consultant and/or board member to some early stage companies and investment groups.

  • Joseph M. DeSimone

    Joseph M. DeSimone

    Sanjiv Sam Gambhir Professor of Translational Medicine, Professor of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemistry, of Materials Science and Engineering, and of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business

    BioJoseph M. DeSimone is the Sanjiv Sam Gambhir Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Engineering at Stanford University. He holds appointments in the Departments of Radiology and Chemical Engineering with courtesy appointments in the Department of Chemistry and in Stanford’s Graduate School of Business.

    The DeSimone laboratory's research efforts are focused on developing innovative, interdisciplinary solutions to complex problems centered around advanced polymer 3D fabrication methods. In Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, the lab is pursuing new capabilities in digital 3D printing, as well as the synthesis of new polymers for use in advanced additive technologies. In Translational Medicine, research is focused on exploiting 3D digital fabrication tools to engineer new vaccine platforms, enhanced drug delivery approaches, and improved medical devices for numerous conditions, with a current major focus in pediatrics. Complementing these research areas, the DeSimone group has a third focus in Entrepreneurship, Digital Transformation, and Manufacturing.

    Before joining Stanford in 2020, DeSimone was a professor of chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and of chemical engineering at North Carolina State University. He is also Co-founder, Board Chair, and former CEO (2014 - 2019) of the additive manufacturing company, Carbon. DeSimone is responsible for numerous breakthroughs in his career in areas including green chemistry, medical devices, nanomedicine, and 3D printing. He has published over 350 scientific articles and is a named inventor on over 200 issued patents. Additionally, he has mentored 80 students through Ph.D. completion in his career, half of whom are women and members of underrepresented groups in STEM.

    In 2016 DeSimone was recognized by President Barack Obama with the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the highest U.S. honor for achievement and leadership in advancing technological progress. He has received numerous other major awards in his career, including the U.S. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award (1997); the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention (2005); the Lemelson-MIT Prize (2008); the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award (2009); the AAAS Mentor Award (2010); the Heinz Award for Technology, the Economy and Employment (2017); the Wilhelm Exner Medal (2019); the EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award (2019 U.S. Overall National Winner); and the Harvey Prize in Science and Technology (2020). He is one of only 25 individuals elected to all three branches of the U.S. National Academies (Sciences, Medicine, Engineering). DeSimone received his B.S. in Chemistry in 1986 from Ursinus College and his Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1990 from Virginia Tech.

  • Thomas Devereaux

    Thomas Devereaux

    Professor of Photon Science, of Materials Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Instiute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research interests lie in the areas of theoretical condensed matter physics and computational physics. My research effort focuses on using the tools of computational physics to understand quantum materials. Fortunately, we are poised in an excellent position as the speed and cost of computers have allowed us to tackle heretofore unaddressed problems involving interacting systems. The goal of my research is to understand electron dynamics via a combination of analytical theory and numerical simulations to provide insight into materials of relevance to energy science. My group carries out numerical simulations on SIMES’ high-performance supercomputer and US and Canadian computational facilities. The specific focus of my group is the development of numerical methods and theories of photon-based spectroscopies of strongly correlated materials.

  • David Dill

    David Dill

    Donald E. Knuth Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSecure and reliable blockchain technology at Facebook.

  • Jennifer Dionne

    Jennifer Dionne

    Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research Platforms/Shared Facilities, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology

    BioJennifer Dionne is the Senior Associate Vice Provost of Research Platforms/Shared Facilities and an Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Radiology (by courtesy) at Stanford. Jen received her Ph.D. in Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology, advised by Harry Atwater, and B.S. degrees in Physics and Systems & Electrical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining Stanford, she served as a postdoctoral researcher in Chemistry at Berkeley, advised by Paul Alivisatos. Jen's research develops nanophotonic methods to observe and control chemical and biological processes as they unfold with nanometer scale resolution, emphasizing critical challenges in global health and sustainability. Her work has been recognized with the Alan T. Waterman Award (2019), an NIH Director's New Innovator Award (2019), a Moore Inventor Fellowship (2017), the Materials Research Society Young Investigator Award (2017), Adolph Lomb Medal (2016), Sloan Foundation Fellowship (2015), and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2014), and was featured on Oprah’s list of “50 Things that will make you say ‘Wow!'"

  • David Donoho

    David Donoho

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioDavid Donoho is a mathematician who has made fundamental contributions to theoretical and computational statistics, as well as to signal processing and harmonic analysis. His algorithms have contributed significantly to our understanding of the maximum entropy principle, of the structure of robust procedures, and of sparse data description.

    Research Statement:
    My theoretical research interests have focused on the mathematics of statistical inference and on theoretical questions arising in applying harmonic analysis to various applied problems. My applied research interests have ranged from data visualization to various problems in scientific signal processing, image processing, and inverse problems.

  • Persis Drell

    Persis Drell

    Provost, James and Anna Marie Spilker Professor and Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Professor of Physics

    BioPersis Drell, Provost

    Drell is a physicist who has served on the Stanford faculty since 2002. She is the James and Anna Marie Spilker Professor in the School of Engineering, a professor of materials science and engineering, and a professor of physics. She is the former dean of the Stanford School of Engineering and the former director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory at Stanford.

    Drell received her bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics from Wellesley College in 1977, followed by a PhD in atomic physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983. She then switched to high-energy experimental physics and worked as a postdoctoral scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She joined the physics faculty at Cornell University in 1988.

    In 2002, Drell joined the Stanford faculty as a professor and director of research at SLAC. In her early years at SLAC, she worked on the construction of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In 2005, she became SLAC’s deputy director and was named director two years later. She led the 1,600-employee SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory until 2012. Drell is credited with helping broaden the focus of the laboratory, increasing collaborations between SLAC and the main Stanford campus, and overseeing transformational projects.

    During Drell’s tenure as director, SLAC transitioned from being a laboratory dedicated primarily to research in high-energy physics to one that is now seen as a leader in a number of scientific disciplines. In 2010, the laboratory began operations of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). LCLS is the world’s most powerful X-ray free electron laser, which is revolutionizing study of the atomic and molecular world. LCLS is used to conduct scientific research and drive applications in energy and environmental sciences, drug development, and materials engineering.

    After serving as the director of SLAC, Drell returned to the Stanford faculty, focusing her research on technology development for free electron lasers and particle astrophysics. Drell was named the dean of the Stanford School of Engineering in 2014.

    As dean of the School of Engineering, Drell catalyzed a collaborative school-wide process, known as the SoE-Future process, to explore the realms of possibility for the future of the School of Engineering and engineering education and research. The process engaged a broad group of stakeholders to ask in what areas the School of Engineering could make significant world-changing impact, and how the school should be configured to address the major opportunities and challenges of the future.

    The process resulted in a set of 10 broad aspirational questions to inspire thought on the school’s potential impact in the next 20 years. The process also resulted in a series of actionable recommendations across three areas – research, education, and culture. Drell’s approach to leading change emphasized the importance of creating conditions to optimize the probability of success.

    As dean, Drell placed an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. She focused on increasing the participation of women and underrepresented minorities in engineering. She also sought to ensure a welcoming and inclusive environment for students of all backgrounds in the school.

    In addition to her administrative responsibilities, Drell teaches a winter-quarter companion course to introductory physics each year for undergraduate students who had limited exposure to the subject in high school.

    Drell is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. She has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award.

  • Leora Dresselhaus-Marais

    Leora Dresselhaus-Marais

    Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group develops new optical and analytical tools to reveal how imperfections deep inside materials instigate the dynamics that transform them. Spanning length- and time-scales from bonds breaking at single atoms through fracture or fatigue in macroscopic materials, these defect dynamics define complex high-dimensional problems that are difficult to reconcile at intermediate scales in order to predict or understand a material's behavior. To address this challenge, my group develops new types of time-resolved experiments aimed at the elusive "mesoscale" to directly visualize how large populations of subsurface defects drive them. With these new approaches, we tackle fundamental studies of how temperature drives materials, and more applied problems that connect our new insights to structural materials, manufacturing, energy science, and beyond.

  • Ron Dror

    Ron Dror

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab’s research focuses on computational biology, with an emphasis on 3D molecular structure. We combine two approaches: (1) Bottom-up: given the basic physics governing atomic interactions, use simulations to predict molecular behavior; (2) Top-down: given experimental data, use machine learning to predict molecular structures and properties. We collaborate closely with experimentalists and apply our methods to the discovery of safer, more effective drugs.

  • John Duchi

    John Duchi

    Associate Professor of Statistics, of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work spans statistical learning, optimization, information theory, and computation, with a few driving goals: 1. To discover statistical learning procedures that optimally trade between real-world resources while maintaining statistical efficiency. 2. To build efficient large-scale optimization methods that move beyond bespoke solutions to methods that robustly work. 3. To develop tools to assess and guarantee the validity of---and confidence we should have in---machine-learned systems.

  • Eric Dunham

    Eric Dunham

    Associate Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysics of natural hazards, specifically earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes. Computational geophysics.

  • Alexander Dunn

    Alexander Dunn

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is deeply interested in uncovering the physical principles that underlie the construction of complex, multicellular animal life.

  • Zakir Durumeric

    Zakir Durumeric

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioI am an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. My research brings a large-scale, empirical approach to the study of security, abuse, and misinformation on the Internet. I build systems to measure complex networked ecosystems, and I use the resulting perspective to understand online behavior, uncover weaknesses, architect more resilient protocols/platforms, and guide policy decisions.

  • Robert Dutton

    Robert Dutton

    Robert and Barbara Kleist Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioDutton's group develops and applies computer aids to process modeling and device analysis. His circuit design activities emphasize layout-related issues of parameter extraction and electrical behavior for devices that affect system performance. Activities include primarily silicon technology modeling both for digital and analog circuits, including OE/RF applications. New emerging area now includes bio-sensors and the development of computer-aided bio-sensor design.

  • John Eaton

    John Eaton

    Charles Lee Powell Foundation Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioEaton uses experiments and computational simulations to study the flow and heat transfer in complex turbulent flows, especially those relevant to turbomachinery, particle-laden flows, and separated flows, and to develop new techniques for precise control of gas and surface temperature during manufacturing processes.

  • Christopher Edwards

    Christopher Edwards

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioThe Edwards research group is focused on fundamental research for advanced energy technologies. The group performs theoretical and experimental studies of energy transformations such that the conversion process can be made cleaner, more efficient, and more controllable than has been possible with traditional technologies. Applications include advanced transportation engines (piston and turbine) and advanced electric power generation with carbon mitigation.

  • Matthew R. Edwards

    Matthew R. Edwards

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioMatthew Edwards is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. His research applies high-power lasers to the development of optical diagnostics for fluids and plasmas, the study of intense light-matter interactions, and the construction of compact light and particle sources, combining adaptive high-repetition-rate experiments and large-scale simulations to explore new regimes in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, materials science, and plasma physics.

    Matthew received BSE, MA, and PhD degrees in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University. He was then a Lawrence Fellow in the National Ignition Facility and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  • Charles (Chuck) Eesley

    Charles (Chuck) Eesley

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the influence of the external environment on entrepreneurship. I investigate the types of environments that encourage the founding of high growth, technology-based firms. I build on previous literature that explains why entrepreneurs are successful and my major contribution is to demonstrate that institutions matter. I show that effective institutional change influences who starts firms, not just how many firms are started.

  • Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D. Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical approaches: Cognition, complexity, learning, and organizational theories

    Methods: Multi-case Theory Building as well as machine learning, simulation, and econometrics

    Recent research: Business model design, strategy as "simple rules" heuristics, strategic interaction in novel markets and ecosystems, strategy in marketplaces, communities v. firm organizational forms

  • Abbas El Gamal

    Abbas El Gamal

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioAbbas El Gamal is the Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his B.Sc. Honors degree from Cairo University in 1972, and his M.S. in Statistics and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering both from Stanford University in 1977 and 1978, respectively. From 1978 to 1980, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at USC. From 2003 to 2012, he was the Director of the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. From 2012 to 2017 he was Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His research contributions have been in network information theory, FPGAs, and digital imaging devices and systems. He has authored or coauthored over 230 papers and holds 35 patents in these areas. He is coauthor of the book Network Information Theory (Cambridge Press 2011). He has received several honors and awards for his research contributions, including the 2016 Richard W. Hamming Medal, the 2012 Claude E. Shannon Award, and the 2004 INFOCOM Paper Award. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has co-founded and served on the board of directors and advisory boards of several semiconductor and biotechnology startup companies.

  • Drew Endy

    Drew Endy

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe work to strengthen the foundations and expand the frontiers of synthetic biology. Our foundational work includes (i) advancing reliable reuse of bio-measurements and -materials via standards that enable coordination of labor, and (ii) developing and integrating measurement and modeling tools for representing and analyzing living matter at whole-cell scales. Our work beyond the frontiers of current practice includes (iii) bootstrapping biotechnology tools in unconventional organisms (e.g., mealworms, wood fungus, skin microbes), and (iv) exploring the limits of whole-genome recoding and building cells from scratch. We also support strategy and policy work related to bio-safety, security, economy, equity, justice, and leadership.

  • Dawson Engler

    Dawson Engler

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioEngler's research focuses both on building interesting software systems and on discovering and exploring the underlying principles of all systems.

  • Stefano Ermon

    Stefano Ermon

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioI am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University, where I am affiliated with the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and a fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment.

    My research is centered on techniques for scalable and accurate inference in graphical models, statistical modeling of data, large-scale combinatorial optimization, and robust decision making under uncertainty, and is motivated by a range of applications, in particular ones in the emerging field of computational sustainability.

  • Jonathan Fan

    Jonathan Fan

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOptical engineering plays a major role in imaging, communications, energy harvesting, and quantum technologies. We are exploring the next frontier of optical engineering on three fronts. The first is new materials development in the growth of crystalline plasmonic materials and assembly of nanomaterials. The second is novel methods for nanofabrication. The third is new inverse design concepts based on optimization and machine learning.

  • Shanhui Fan

    Shanhui Fan

    Joseph and Hon Mai Goodman Professor of the School of Engineering and, Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioFan's research involves the theory and simulations of photonic and solid-state materials and devices; photonic crystals; nano-scale photonic devices and plasmonics; quantum optics; computational electromagnetics; parallel scientific computing.

  • Charbel Farhat

    Charbel Farhat

    Vivian Church Hoff Professor of Aircraft Structures, James and Anna Marie Spilker Chair of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCharbel Farhat and his Research Group (FRG) develop mathematical models, advanced computational algorithms, and high-performance software for the design and analysis of complex systems in aerospace, marine, mechanical, and naval engineering. They contribute major advances to Simulation-Based Engineering Science. Current engineering foci in research are on the nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) with flexible flapping wings and N+3 aircraft with High Aspect Ratio (HAR) wings, layout optimization and additive manufacturing of wing structures, supersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators for Mars landing, and the reliable automated carrier landing via model predictive control. Current theoretical and computational emphases in research are on high-performance, multi-scale modeling for the high-fidelity analysis of multi-physics problems, high-order embedded boundary methods, uncertainty quantification, probabilistic machine learning, and efficient projection-based model order reduction as well as other forms of physics-based machine learning for time-critical applications such as design, active control, and digital twins.

  • Rainer Fasching

    Rainer Fasching

    Adjunct Professor

    BioDr. Rainer Fasching is a technology executive and a consulting associate professor at Stanford University, where he teaches advanced electrochemical energy storage and sensor technologies. He has over 20 years of experience in electrochemical devices, micro fabrication technologies, and industrial product development. His work has been centered on the physics, materials and fabrication technologies of electrochemical systems such as sensors, batteries and associated materials, and fuel cells. Currently he has been leading the development of advanced energy storage technologies from concept to product at top tier startup companies. He holds over 30 issued and/or published patents and has authored more than 60 publications.

  • Aurore Fass

    Aurore Fass

    Visiting Assistant Professor

    BioI am a Visiting Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. My research broadly focusses on Web security and privacy, Web measurements, and machine learning. Specifically, I am interested in detecting malware & vulnerabilities on the Web and collecting data to better understand and improve user security and privacy.

  • Kayvon Fatahalian

    Kayvon Fatahalian

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioKayvon Fatahalian is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. Kayvon's research focuses on the design of systems for real-time graphics, rendering systems for machine learning, and the analysis of images and videos at scale.

  • Ron Fedkiw

    Ron Fedkiw

    Professor of Computer Science

    BioFedkiw's research is focused on the design of new computational algorithms for a variety of applications including computational fluid dynamics, computer graphics, and biomechanics.

  • Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Dunlevie Family Professor of Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include (1) computer simulation and modeling of cardiovascular physiology with specific attention paid to congenital heart disease and its treatment, (2) the evaluation and treatment of pulmonary hypertension/pulmonary vascular diseases, and (3) development and testing of medical devices/therapies for the treatment of congenital heart disease and pulmonary vascular diseases.

  • Richard Fikes

    Richard Fikes

    Professor (Research) of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioRichard Fikes has a long and distinguished record as an innovative leader in the development of techniques for effectively representing and using knowledge in computer systems. He is best known as co-developer of the STRIPS automatic planning system, KIF (Knowledge Interchange Format), the Ontolingua ontology representation language and Web-based ontology development environment, the OKBC (Open Knowledge Base Connectivity) API for knowledge servers, and IntelliCorp's KEE system. At Stanford, he led projects focused on developing large-scale distributed repositories of computer-interpretable knowledge, collaborative development of multi-use ontologies, enabling technology for the Semantic Web, reasoning methods applicable to large-scale knowledge bases, and knowledge-based technology for intelligence analysts. He was principal investigator of major projects for multiple Federal Government agencies including the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Intelligence Community’s Advanced Research and Development Activity (ARDA).

  • Chelsea Finn

    Chelsea Finn

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioChelsea Finn is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and the William George and Ida Mary Hoover Faculty Fellow. Professor Finn's research interests lie in the ability to enable robots and other agents to develop broadly intelligent behavior through learning and interaction. Her work lies at the intersection of machine learning and robotic control, including topics such as end-to-end learning of visual perception and robotic manipulation skills, deep reinforcement learning of general skills from autonomously collected experience, and meta-learning algorithms that can enable fast learning of new concepts and behaviors. Professor Finn received her Bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and her PhD in Computer Science at UC Berkeley. Her research has been recognized through the ACM doctoral dissertation award, an NSF graduate fellowship, a Facebook fellowship, the C.V. Ramamoorthy Distinguished Research Award, and the MIT Technology Review 35 under 35 Award, and her work has been covered by various media outlets, including the New York Times, Wired, and Bloomberg. Throughout her career, she has sought to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities within CS and AI by developing an AI outreach camp at Berkeley for underprivileged high school students, a mentoring program for underrepresented undergraduates across three universities, and leading efforts within the WiML and Berkeley WiCSE communities of women researchers.

    Website: https://ai.stanford.edu/~cbfinn

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and of Medicine (Microbiology and Immunology)

    BioMichael Fischbach is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Bioengineering and Microbiology & Immunology at Stanford University, an Institute Scholar of Stanford ChEM-H, and the director of the Stanford Microbiome Therapies Initiative. Fischbach is a recipient of the NIH Director's Pioneer and New Innovator Awards, an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholars Award, a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, a Medical Research Award from the W.M. Keck Foundation, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease award, and a Glenn Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging. His laboratory uses a combination of genomics and chemistry to identify and characterize small molecules from microbes, with an emphasis on the human microbiome. Fischbach received his Ph.D. as a John and Fannie Hertz Foundation Fellow in chemistry from Harvard in 2007, where he studied the role of iron acquisition in bacterial pathogenesis and the biosynthesis of antibiotics. After two years as an independent fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital, Fischbach joined the faculty at UCSF, where he founded his lab before moving to Stanford in 2017. Fischbach is a co-founder and director of Federation Bio and Viralogic, a co-founder of Revolution Medicines, a member of the scientific advisory boards of NGM Biopharmaceuticals and Zymergen, and an innovation partner at The Column Group.

  • Martin Fischer

    Martin Fischer

    Kumagai Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioProfessor Fischer's research goals are to improve the productivity of project teams involved in designing, building, and operating facilities and to enhance the sustainability of the built environment. His work develops the theoretical foundations and applications for virtual design and construction (VDC). VDC methods support the design of a facility and its delivery process and help reduce the costs and maximize the value over its lifecycle. His research has been used by many small and large industrial government organizations around the world.

  • Ian Fisher

    Ian Fisher

    Professor of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the study of quantum materials with unconventional magnetic & electronic ground states & phase transitions. Emphasis on design and discovery of new materials. Recent focus on use of strain as a probe of, and tuning parameter for, a variety of electronic states. Interests include unconventional superconductivity, quantum phase transitions, nematicity, multipolar order, instabilities of low-dimensional materials and quantum magnetism.

  • Sarah Fletcher

    Sarah Fletcher

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Center Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fletcher Lab aims to advance water resources management to promote resilient and equitable responses to a changing world.

  • June Flora

    June Flora

    Sr. Research Scholar

    BioJune A. Flora, PhD, is a senior research scientist at Stanford University’s Human Sciences & Technologies Advanced Research Institute (HSTAR) in the Graduate School of Education, and the Solutions Science Lab in the Stanford School of Medicine. June's research focuses on understanding the drivers of human behavior change and the potential of communication interventions. The research is solution focused on behavior change relevant to health and climate change.

    Most recently she is studying the role of energy use feedback delivered through motivationally framed online applications; the potential of children and youth delivered energy reduction interventions to motivate parent behavior change, and the effects of entertainment-education interventions to change behavior.

    June earned her Ph.D. from Arizona State University in educational psychology. She has held faculty positions at University of Utah and Stanford University.

  • Sean Follmer

    Sean Follmer

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman Computer Interaction, Haptics, Robotics, Human Centered Design

  • Derek Fong

    Derek Fong

    Sr Research Engineer

    BioDerek Fong's research in environmental and geophysical fluid dynamics focuses on understanding the fundamental transport and mixing processes in the rivers, estuaries and the coastal ocean. He employs different methods for studying such fluid processes including laboratory experiments, field experiments, and numerical modeling. His research projects include studying lateral dispersion, in stratified coastal flows, the fate and transport of freshwater in river plumes, advanced hydrodynamic measurement techniques, coherent structures in nearshore flows, bio-physical interactions in stratified lakes, fate of contaminated sediments, and secondary circulation and mixing in curved channels.

    Derek teaches a variety of classes at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Some of the classes he has offered include Mechanics of Fluids; Rivers, Streams and Canals; Transport and Mixing in Surface Waters; Introduction to Physical Oceanography; Mechanics of Stratified Fluids; Dynamics of Lakes and Reservoirs; Science and Engineering Problem Solving using Matlab; the Future and Science of Water; Hydrodynamics and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics.

    Prior to coming to Stanford, Derek spent five years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution studying the dynamics of freshwater plumes for his doctoral thesis. He has also served as a senior lecturer at the University of Washington, Friday Harbor Laboratories in Friday Harbor, Washington.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on three main platforms: (1) arrays of valved reaction chambers for high-throughput protein expression and characterization, (2) spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed bioassays, and (3) sortable droplets and microwells for single-cell assays.

  • Emily Fox

    Emily Fox

    Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioEmily Fox is a Professor in the Department of Statistics and, by courtesy, Computer Science at Stanford University. Prior to Stanford, she was the Amazon Professor of Machine Learning in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering and Department of Statistics at the University of Washington. From 2018-2021, Emily led the Health AI team at Apple, where she was a Distinguished Engineer. Before joining UW, Emily was an Assistant Professor at the Wharton School Department of Statistics at the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her doctorate from Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) at MIT where her thesis was recognized with EECS' Jin-Au Kong Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Prize and the Leonard J. Savage Award for Best Thesis in Applied Methodology.

    Emily has been awarded a CZ Biohub Investigator Award, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), a Sloan Research Fellowship, ONR Young Investigator Award, and NSF CAREER Award. Her research interests are in large-scale Bayesian dynamic modeling, interpretability and computations, with applications in health and computational neuroscience.

  • Curtis Frank

    Curtis Frank

    W. M. Keck, Sr. Professor in Engineering, Emeritus

    BioThe properties of ultrathin polymer films are often different from their bulk counterparts. We use spin casting, Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and surface grafting to fabricate ultrathin films in the range of 100 to 1000 Angstroms thick. Macromolecular amphiphiles are examined at the air-water interface by surface pressure, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial shear measurements and on solid substrates by atomic force microscopy, FTIR, and ellipsometry. A vapor-deposition-polymerization process has been developed for covalent grafting of poly(amino acids) from solid substrates. FTIR measurements permit study of secondary structures (right and left-handed alpha helices, parallel and anti-parallel beta sheets) as a function of temperature and environment.

    A broadly interdisciplinary collaboration has been established with the Department of Ophthalmology in the Stanford School of Medicine. We have designed and synthesized a fully interpenetrating network of two different hydrogel materials that have properties consistent with application as a substitute for the human cornea: high water swellability up to 85%,tensile strength comparable to the cornea, high glucose permeability comparable to the cornea, and sufficient tear strength to permit suturing. We have developed a technique for surface modification with adhesion peptides that allows binding of collagen and subsequent growth of epithelial cells. Broad questions on the relationships among molecular structure, processing protocol, and biomedical device application are being pursued.

  • Antony Fraser-Smith

    Antony Fraser-Smith

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering and of Geophysics, Emeritus

    BioFraser-Smith's research focuses on the use of low frequency electromagnetic fields, both as a means of probing (1) the interior of the earth, and (2) the space environment near the earth, as well as for communicating with, and detecting, objects submerged in the sea or buried in the earth, and for detecting changes taking place in the Earth and the near-Earth space environment.

  • David Freyberg

    David Freyberg

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy students and I study sediment and water balances in aging reservoirs, collaborative governance of transnational fresh waters, the design of centralized and decentralized wastewater collection, treatment, and reuse systems in urban areas, and hydrologic ecosystem services in urban areas and in systems for which sediment production, transport, and deposition have significant consequences.

  • Oliver Fringer

    Oliver Fringer

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioFringer's research focuses on the development and application of numerical models and high-performance computational techniques to the study of fundamental processes that influence the dynamics of the coastal ocean, rivers, lakes, and estuaries.

  • Renate Fruchter

    Renate Fruchter

    Director of PBL Lab

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCognitive demands on global learners, VR in teamwork, Sustainability, Wellbeing

  • Gerald Fuller

    Gerald Fuller

    Fletcher Jones Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioThe processing of complex liquids (polymers, suspensions, emulsions, biological fluids) alters their microstructure through orientation and deformation of their constitutive elements. In the case of polymeric liquids, it is of interest to obtain in situ measurements of segmental orientation and optical methods have proven to be an excellent means of acquiring this information. Research in our laboratory has resulted in a number of techniques in optical rheometry such as high-speed polarimetry (birefringence and dichroism) and various microscopy methods (fluorescence, phase contrast, and atomic force microscopy).

    The microstructure of polymeric and other complex materials also cause them to have interesting physical properties and respond to different flow conditions in unusual manners. In our laboratory, we are equipped with instruments that are able to characterize these materials such as shear rheometer, capillary break up extensional rheometer, and 2D extensional rheometer. Then, the response of these materials to different flow conditions can be visualized and analyzed in detail using high speed imaging devices at up to 2,000 frames per second.

    There are numerous processes encountered in nature and industry where the deformation of fluid-fluid interfaces is of central importance. Examples from nature include deformation of the red blood cell in small capillaries, cell division and structure and composition of the tear film. Industrial applications include the processing of emulsions and foams, and the atomization of droplets in ink-jet printing. In our laboratory, fundamental research is in progress to understand the orientation and deformation of monolayers at the molecular level. These experiments employ state of the art optical methods such as polarization modulated dichroism, fluorescence microscopy, and Brewster angle microscopy to obtain in situ measurements of polymer films and small molecule amphiphile monolayers subject to flow. Langmuir troughs are used as the experimental platform so that the thermodynamic state of the monolayers can be systematically controlled. For the first time, well characterized, homogeneous surface flows have been developed, and real time measurements of molecular and microdomain orientation have been obtained. These microstructural experiments are complemented by measurements of the macroscopic, mechanical properties of the films.

  • Grace Gao

    Grace Gao

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioGrace Gao is an assistant professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. She leads the Navigation and Autonomous Vehicles Laboratory (NAV Lab). Before joining Stanford University, she was faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She obtained her Ph.D. degree at Stanford University. Her research is on robust and secure perception, localization and navigation with applications to manned and unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous driving cars, as well as space robotics.

    Prof. Gao has won a number of awards, including the NSF CAREER Award, the Institute of Navigation Early Achievement Award and the RTCA William E. Jackson Award. She received the Distinguished Promotion Award from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has won Best Paper/Presentation of the Session Awards 14 times at ION GNSS+ conferences. She received the Dean's Award for Excellence in Research from the College of Engineering, University of Illinois. For her teaching, Prof. Gao has been on the List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students at University of Illinois multiple times. She won the College of Engineering Everitt Award for Teaching Excellence, the Engineering Council Award for Excellence in Advising, and AIAA Illinois Chapter’s Teacher of the Year.

  • Xiaojing Gao

    Xiaojing Gao

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    BioHow do we design biological systems as “smart medicine” that sense patients’ states, process the information, and respond accordingly? To realize this vision, we will tackle fundamental challenges across different levels of complexity, such as (1) protein components that minimize their crosstalk with human cells and immunogenicity, (2) biomolecular circuits that function robustly in different cells and are easy to deliver, (3) multicellular consortia that communicate through scalable channels, and (4) therapeutic modules that interface with physiological inputs/outputs. Our engineering targets include biomolecules, molecular circuits, viruses, and cells, and our approach combines quantitative experimental analysis with computational simulation. The molecular tools we build will be applied to diverse fields such as neurobiology and cancer therapy.

  • Matthias Garten

    Matthias Garten

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and of Bioengineering

    BioMatthias Garten, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the department of Immunology and Microbiology and the department of Bioengineering. He is a membrane biophysicist who is driven by the question of how the malaria parasite interfaces with its host-red blood cell, how we can use the unique mechanisms of the parasite to treat malaria and to re-engineer cells for biomedical applications.

    He obtained a physics master's degree from the Dresden University of Technology, Germany with a thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Petra Schwille and his Ph.D. life sciences from the University Paris Diderot, France through his work in the lab of Dr. Patricia Bassereau (Insitut Curie) investigating electrical properties of lipid membranes and protein - membrane interactions using biomimetic model systems, giant liposomes and planar lipid membranes.

    In his post-doctoral work at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda in the laboratory of Dr. Joshua Zimmerberg, he used molecular, biophysical and quantitative approaches to research the malaria parasite. His work led to the discovery of structure-function relationships that govern the host cell – parasite interface, opening research avenues to understand how the parasite connects to and controls its host cell.