School of Engineering


Showing 1-100 of 160 Results

  • Maneesh Agrawala

    Maneesh Agrawala

    Forest Baskett Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComputer Graphics, Human Computer Interaction and Visualization.

  • Amin Arbabian

    Amin Arbabian

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group's research covers RF circuits and system design for (1) biomedical, (2) sensing, and (3) Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

  • Nicholas Bambos

    Nicholas Bambos

    Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioNick Bambos is a Professor at Stanford University, having a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Management Science & Engineering. He heads the Network Architecture and Performance Engineering research group at Stanford, conducting research in wireless network architectures, the Internet infrastructure, packet switching, network management and information service engineering, engaged in various projects of his Network Architecture Laboratory (NetLab). His current technology research interests include high-performance networking, autonomic computing, and service engineering. His methodological interests are in network control, online task scheduling, queueing systems and stochastic processing networks.

    He has graduated over 20 Ph.D. students, who are now at leadership positions in academia (Stanford, CalTech, Michigan, GaTech, NYU, UBC, etc.) and the information technology industry (Cisco, Broadcom, IBM Labs, Qualcomm, Nokia, MITRE, Sun Labs, ST Micro, Intel, Samsung, TI, etc.) or have become successful entrepreneurs. From 1999 to 2005 he served as the director of the Stanford Networking Research Center, a major partnership/consortium between Stanford and information technology industries, involving tens of corporate members, faculty and doctoral students. He is now heading a new research initiative at Stanford on Networked Information Service Engineering.

    He is on the Editorial Boards of several research journals and serves on various international technical committees and review panels for networking research and information technologies. He has been serving on the boards of various start-up companies in the Silicon Valley, consults on high technology development and management matters, and has served as lead expert witness in high-profile patent litigation cases in networking and computing.

  • Mohsen Bayati

    Mohsen Bayati

    Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Healthcare management: I am interested in improving healthcare delivery using data-driven modeling and decision-making.

    2) Network models and message-passing algorithms: I work on graphical modeling ideas motivated from statistical physics and their applications in statistical inference.

    3) Personalized decision-making: I work on machine learning and statistical challenges of personalized decision-making. The problems that I have worked on are primarily motivated by healthcare applications.

  • Stacey Bent

    Stacey Bent

    Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs, Jagdeep and Roshni Singh Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science & Engineering, of Electrical Engineering and of Chemistry

    BioThe research in the Bent laboratory is focused on understanding and controlling surface and interfacial chemistry and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in semiconductor processing, micro- and nano-electronics, nanotechnology, and sustainable and renewable energy. Much of the research aims to develop a molecular-level understanding in these systems, and hence the group uses of a variety of molecular probes. Systems currently under study in the group include functionalization of semiconductor surfaces, mechanisms and control of atomic layer deposition, molecular layer deposition, nanoscale materials for light absorption, interface engineering in photovoltaics, catalyst and electrocatalyst deposition.

  • Kwabena Boahen

    Kwabena Boahen

    Professor of Bioengineering, of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLarge-scale models of sensory, perceptual and motor systems

  • Dan Boneh

    Dan Boneh

    Cryptography Professor, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioProfessor Boneh heads the applied cryptography group and co-direct the computer security lab. Professor Boneh's research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His work includes cryptosystems with novel properties, web security, security for mobile devices, and cryptanalysis. He is the author of over a hundred publications in the field and is a Packard and Alfred P. Sloan fellow. He is a recipient of the 2014 ACM prize and the 2013 Godel prize. In 2011 Dr. Boneh received the Ishii award for industry education innovation. Professor Boneh received his Ph.D from Princeton University and joined Stanford in 1997.

  • Stephen Boyd

    Stephen Boyd

    Samsung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Management Science and Engineering

    BioStephen P. Boyd is the Samsung Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. He has courtesy appointments in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, and is member of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. His current research focus is on convex optimization applications in control, signal processing, machine learning, and finance.

    Professor Boyd received an AB degree in Mathematics, summa cum laude, from Harvard University in 1980, and a PhD in EECS from U. C. Berkeley in 1985. In 1985 he joined Stanford's Electrical Engineering Department. He has held visiting Professor positions at Katholieke University (Leuven), McGill University (Montreal), Ecole Polytechnique Federale (Lausanne), Tsinghua University (Beijing), Universite Paul Sabatier (Toulouse), Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm), Kyoto University, Harbin Institute of Technology, NYU, MIT, UC Berkeley, CUHK-Shenzhen, and IMT Lucca. He holds honorary doctorates from Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, and Catholic University of Louvain (UCL).

    Professor Boyd is the author of many research articles and four books: Introduction to Applied Linear Algebra: Vectors, Matrices, and Least-Squares (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2018), Convex Optimization (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory (with El Ghaoui, Feron, and Balakrishnan, 1994), and Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced many open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), CVXPY (with Steven Diamond) and Convex.jl (with Madeleine Udell and others), widely used parser-solvers for convex optimization.

    Professor Boyd has received many awards and honors for his research in control systems engineering and optimization, including an ONR Young Investigator Award, a Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the AACC Donald P. Eckman Award. In 2013, he received the IEEE Control Systems Award, given for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. In 2012, Michael Grant and he were given the Mathematical Optimization Society's Beale-Orchard-Hays Award, for excellence in computational mathematical programming. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, SIAM, and INFORMS, a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Control Systems Society, a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, and a foreign member of the National Academy of Engineering of Korea. He has been invited to deliver more than 90 plenary and keynote lectures at major conferences in control, optimization, signal processing, and machine learning.

    He has developed and taught many undergraduate and graduate courses, including Signals & Systems, Linear Dynamical Systems, Convex Optimization, and a recent undergraduate course on Matrix Methods. His graduate convex optimization course attracts around 300 students from more than 20 departments. In 1991 he received an ASSU Graduate Teaching Award, and in 1994 he received the Perrin Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in the School of Engineering. In 2003, he received the AACC Ragazzini Education award, for contributions to control education, with citation: “For excellence in classroom teaching, textbook and monograph preparation, and undergraduate and graduate mentoring of students in the area of systems, control, and optimization.” In 2016 he received the Walter J. Gores award, the highest award for teaching at Stanford University. In 2017 he received the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE, with citation "For inspirational education of students and researchers in the theory and application of optimization."

  • Emmanuel Candes

    Emmanuel Candes

    Barnum-Simons Chair in Math and Statistics, and Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioEmmanuel Candès is the Barnum-Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics, a professor of electrical engineering (by courtesy) and a member of the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford University. Earlier, Candès was the Ronald and Maxine Linde Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests are in computational harmonic analysis, statistics, information theory, signal processing and mathematical optimization with applications to the imaging sciences, scientific computing and inverse problems. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University in 1998.

    Candès has received several awards including the Alan T. Waterman Award from NSF, which is the highest honor bestowed by the National Science Foundation, and which recognizes the achievements of early-career scientists. He has given over 60 plenary lectures at major international conferences, not only in mathematics and statistics but in many other areas as well including biomedical imaging and solid-state physics. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2014.

  • E.J. Chichilnisky

    E.J. Chichilnisky

    John R. Adler Professor, Professor of Neurosurgery and of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunctional circuitry of the retina and design of retinal prostheses

  • Srabanti Chowdhury

    Srabanti Chowdhury

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWide bandap materials & devices for RF, Power and energy efficient electronics

  • John M. Cioffi

    John M. Cioffi

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioJohn M. Cioffi taught Stanford's graduate electrical engineering course sequence in digital communications for over 20 years from 1986 to 2008, when he retired to emeritus. Cioffi's research interests were in the theory of transmitting the highest possible data rates on a number of different communications channels, many of which efforts were spun out of Stanford through he and/or his many former PhD students to companies, most notably including the basic designed used worldwide on more than 500 million DSL connections. Cioffi also over saw the prototype developments for the worlds first cable modem and digital-audio broadcast system. Cioffi pioneering the use of remote management algorithms to improve (over the internet or cloud) both wireline (DSL) and wireless (Wi-Fi) physical-layer transmission performance, an area often known as Dynamic Spectrum Management or Dynamic Line Management. Cioffi was co-inventer on basic patents for vectored DSL transmission and optimized MIMO wireless transmission. In his early career, Cioffi developed the worlds first full-duplex voiceband data modem while at Bell Laboratories, and the worlds first adaptively equalized disk read channel while at IBM. His courses and research projects over the years centered on these areas.

  • Sigrid Close

    Sigrid Close

    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioProf. Close's research involves space weather detection and modeling for improved spacecraft designs, and advanced signal processing and electromagnetic wave interactions with plasma for ground-to-satellite communication systems. These topics fall under the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) umbrella that include environmental remote sensing using satellite systems and ground-based radar. Her current efforts are the MEDUSSA (Meteoroid, Energetics, and Debris Understanding for Space Situational Awareness) program, which uses dust accelerators to understand the effects of hypervelocity particle impacts on spacecraft along with Particle-In-Cell simulations, and using ground-based radars to characterize the space debris and meteoroid population remotely. She also has active programs in hypersonic plasmas associated with re-entry vehicles.

  • Daniel Norbert Congreve

    Daniel Norbert Congreve

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioDan Congreve received his B.S. and M.S. from Iowa State in 2011, working with Vik Dalal studying defect densities of nano-crystalline and amorphous silicon. He received his PhD from MIT in 2015, studying under Marc Baldo. His thesis work focused on photonic energy conversion using singlet fission and triplet fusion as a downconverting and upconverting process, respectively. He joined the Rowland Institute at Harvard University in August 2016, where his current research efforts focus on controlling light and energy at the nanoscale. He will start as an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford in Fall 2020.

  • Adam de la Zerda

    Adam de la Zerda

    Associate Professor of Structural Biology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
    On Leave from 09/10/2020 To 09/09/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular imaging technologies for studying cancer biology in vivo

  • John Duchi

    John Duchi

    Assistant Professor of Statistics and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work spans statistical learning, optimization, information theory, and computation, with a few driving goals: 1. To discover statistical learning procedures that optimally trade between real-world resources while maintaining statistical efficiency. 2. To build efficient large-scale optimization methods that move beyond bespoke solutions to methods that robustly work. 3. To develop tools to assess and guarantee the validity of---and confidence we should have in---machine-learned systems.

  • Robert Dutton

    Robert Dutton

    Robert and Barbara Kleist Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioDutton's group develops and applies computer aids to process modeling and device analysis. His circuit design activities emphasize layout-related issues of parameter extraction and electrical behavior for devices that affect system performance. Activities include primarily silicon technology modeling both for digital and analog circuits, including OE/RF applications. New emerging area now includes bio-sensors and the development of computer-aided bio-sensor design.

  • Abbas El Gamal

    Abbas El Gamal

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioAbbas El Gamal is the Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his B.Sc. Honors degree from Cairo University in 1972, and his M.S. in Statistics and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering both from Stanford University in 1977 and 1978, respectively. From 1978 to 1980, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at USC. From 2003 to 2012, he was the Director of the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. From 2012 to 2017 he was Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His research contributions have been in network information theory, FPGAs, and digital imaging devices and systems. He has authored or coauthored over 230 papers and holds 35 patents in these areas. He is coauthor of the book Network Information Theory (Cambridge Press 2011). He has received several honors and awards for his research contributions, including the 2016 Richard W. Hamming Medal, the 2012 Claude E. Shannon Award, and the 2004 INFOCOM Paper Award. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has co-founded and served on the board of directors and advisory boards of several semiconductor and biotechnology startup companies.

  • Dawson Engler

    Dawson Engler

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioEngler's research focuses both on building interesting software systems and on discovering and exploring the underlying principles of all systems.

  • Jonathan Fan

    Jonathan Fan

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOptical engineering plays a major role in imaging, communications, energy harvesting, and quantum technologies. We are exploring the next frontier of optical engineering on three fronts. The first is new materials development in the growth of crystalline plasmonic materials and assembly of nanomaterials. The second is novel methods for nanofabrication. The third is new inverse design concepts based on optimization and machine learning.

  • Shanhui Fan

    Shanhui Fan

    Director, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioFan's research involves the theory and simulations of photonic and solid-state materials and devices; photonic crystals; nano-scale photonic devices and plasmonics; quantum optics; computational electromagnetics; parallel scientific computing.

  • Chelsea Finn

    Chelsea Finn

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioChelsea Finn is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Professor Finn's research interests lie in the ability to enable robots and other agents to develop broadly intelligent behavior through learning and interaction. Her work lies at the intersection of machine learning and robotic control, including topics such as end-to-end learning of visual perception and robotic manipulation skills, deep reinforcement learning of general skills from autonomously collected experience, and meta-learning algorithms that can enable fast learning of new concepts and behaviors.
    Professor Finn received her Bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and her PhD in Computer Science at UC Berkeley. Her research has been recognized through the ACM doctoral dissertation award, an NSF graduate fellowship, a Facebook fellowship, the C.V. Ramamoorthy Distinguished Research Award, and the MIT Technology Review 35 under 35 Award, and her work has been covered by various media outlets, including the New York Times, Wired, and Bloomberg. Throughout her career, she has sought to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities within CS and AI by developing an AI outreach camp at Berkeley for underprivileged high school students, a mentoring program for underrepresented undergraduates across three universities, and leading efforts within the WiML and Berkeley WiCSE communities of women researchers.

    Website: https://ai.stanford.edu/~cbfinn

  • Antony Fraser-Smith

    Antony Fraser-Smith

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering and of Geophysics, Emeritus

    BioFraser-Smith's research focuses on the use of low frequency electromagnetic fields, both as a means of probing (1) the interior of the earth, and (2) the space environment near the earth, as well as for communicating with, and detecting, objects submerged in the sea or buried in the earth, and for detecting changes taking place in the Earth and the near-Earth space environment.

  • Grace X. Gao

    Grace X. Gao

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioGrace Xingxin Gao is an assistant professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. She leads the Navigation and Autonomous Vehicles Laboratory (NAV Lab). Before joining Stanford University, she was faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She obtained her Ph.D. degree at Stanford University. Her research is on robust and secure perception, localization and navigation with applications to manned and unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous driving cars, robotics and internet of things.

    Prof. Gao has won a number of awards, including the NSF CAREER Award, the Institute of Navigation Early Achievement Award and the RTCA William E. Jackson Award. She received the Distinguished Promotion Award from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has won Best Paper/Presentation of the Session Awards 14 times at ION GNSS+ conferences. She received the Dean's Award for Excellence in Research from the College of Engineering, University of Illinois. For her teaching, Prof. Gao has been on the List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students at University of Illinois multiple times. She won the College of Engineering Everitt Award for Teaching Excellence, the Engineering Council Award for Excellence in Advising, and AIAA Illinois Chapter’s Teacher of the Year.

  • James F Gibbons

    James F Gibbons

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioA pioneer in the use of ion implantation and rapid thermal process techniques for solid-state physics, Gibbons also conducts research into semiconductor device analysis, fabrication, and process physics. Current research is focused on the growth and processing of thin semiconductor films and nanostructures that offer potential for advanced semiconductor and optical device development.

  • John Gill

    John Gill

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioGill's research interests are in the areas of computational complexity theory and information theory, including probabilistic computation, lossless data compression, and error correcting codes.

  • Bernd Girod

    Bernd Girod

    Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGirod's research focuses on algorithms and systems for multimedia analysis and communication. Applications range from wireless media delivery to interactive video streaming to mobile visual search and augmented reality.

  • Gary Glover

    Gary Glover

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy present research is devoted to the advancement of functional magnetic resonance imaging sciences for applications in basic understanding of the brain in health and disease. We collaborate closely with departmental clinicians and with others in the school of medicine, humanities, and the engineering sciences.

  • Peter Glynn

    Peter Glynn

    Thomas W. Ford Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStochastic modeling; statistics; simulation; finance

  • Andrea Goldsmith

    Andrea Goldsmith

    Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering, Emerita

    BioAndrea Goldsmith is the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering and professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research interests are in information theory, communication theory, and signal processing, and their application to wireless communications, interconnected systems, and neuroscience. She co-founded and served as Chief Technical Officer and Board member of Plume WiFi and of Quantenna (QTNA), and she currently serves on the Board of Directors for Medtronic (MDT) and Crown Castle Inc. (CCI). She has also been a member or chair of the technical advisory boards for Quantenna (QTNA), Sequans (SQNS), Interdigital (IDCC) and Cohere. Goldsmith has launched and led several multi-university research projects including DARPA’s ITMANET program, and she is currently a Principle Investigator in the NSF Center on the Science of Information. Prior to Stanford she held positions at Caltech, Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the IEEE and of Stanford, and has received several awards for her work, including the IEEE Eric E. Sumner Technical Field Award in Communications Technology, the ComSoc Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award as well as Technical Achievement Awards in Communications Theory and in Wireless Communications, the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecture Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book ``Wireless Communications'' and co-author of the books ``MIMO Wireless Communications'' and “Principles of Cognitive Radio,” all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 29 patents. She has served in various leadership roles in the IEEE and in industrial groups aimed at diversifying STEM fields, and is currently the founding chair of the IEEE Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Professional Ethics. At Stanford she has served as chair and a member of the Faculty Senate and on the Planning and Policy Board, Committee on Research, Commissions on Graduate Education and on Undergraduate Education, Task Force on Women and Leadership, and the Faculty Women's Forum Steering Committee. She currently serves on Stanford's Budget Group, Advisory Board, and in the Faculty Senate.

  • Robert M Gray

    Robert M Gray

    Alcatel-Lucent Professor in Communications and Networking, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research falls in the intersection of Shannon information theory and signal processing. In particular, I am interested in the theory and design of block codes and sliding-block (or stationary or time-invariant) codes for data compression and their relation to each other. Block codes are far better understood and more widely used, but their lack of stationarity causes difficulties in theory and artifacts in practice. Very little is known about the design of good sliding-block codes, but the problem is known to be equivalent to the design of entropy-constrained simulators of complex random processes. I also do research in the history of information theory and signal processing, especially in the development of speech processing systems and real time signal processing.

  • Leonidas Guibas

    Leonidas Guibas

    Paul Pigott Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeometric and topological data analysis and machine learning. Algorithms for the joint analysis of collections of images, 3D models, or trajectories. 3D reconstruction.

  • Pat Hanrahan

    Pat Hanrahan

    Canon USA Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Hanrahan's current research involves rendering algorithms, high performance graphics architectures, and systems support for graphical interaction. He also has worked on raster graphics systems, computer animation and modeling and scientific visualization, in particular, volume rendering.

  • Brian A. Hargreaves

    Brian A. Hargreaves

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications and augmented reality applications in medicine. These include abdominal, breast and musculoskeletal imaging, which require development of faster, quantitative, and more efficient MRI methods that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. My work includes novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods and reconstruction tools and augmented reality in medicine.

  • James Harris

    James Harris

    James and Elenor Chesebrough Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioHarris utilizes molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of III-V compound semiconductor materials to investigate new materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. He utilizes heterojunctions, superlattices, quantum wells, and three-dimensional self-assembled quantum dots to create metastable engineered materials with novel or improved properties for electronic and optoelectronic devices. He has recently focused on three areas: 1) integration of photonic devices and micro optics for creation of new minimally invasive bio and medical systems for micro-array and neural imaging and 2) application of nanostructures semiconductors for the acceleration of electrons using light, a dielectric Laser Accelerator (DLA), and 3) novel materials and nano structuring for high efficiency solar cells and photo electrochemical water splitting for the generation of hydrogen.

  • Stephen E. Harris

    Stephen E. Harris

    Kenneth and Barbara Oshman Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Applied Physics, Emeritus

    BioHarris' interests include lasers, quantum electronics, atomic physics, and nonlinear optics.

  • Tony Heinz

    Tony Heinz

    Professor of Applied Physics and of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElectronic properties and dynamics of nanoscale materials, ultrafast lasers and spectroscopy.

  • Martin Hellman

    Martin Hellman

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioMartin E. Hellman is Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University and is affiliated with the university's Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). His most recent work, "Rethinking National Security," identifies a number of questionable assumptions that are largely taken as axiomatic truths. A key part of that work brings a risk informed framework to a potential failure of nuclear deterrence and then finds surprising ways to reduce the risk. His earlier work included co-inventing public key cryptography, the technology that underlies the secure portion of the Internet. His many honors include election to the National Academy of Engineering and receiving (jointly with his colleague Whit Diffie) the million dollar ACM Turing Award, the top prize in computer science. In 2016, he and his wife of fifty years published "A New Map for Relationships: Creating True Love at Home & Peace on the Planet," providing a “unified field theory” for peace by illuminating the connections between nuclear war, conventional war, interpersonal war, and war within our own psyches.

  • John Hennessy

    John Hennessy

    President Emeritus, Shriram Family Director of the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program and Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioJohn L. Hennessy joined Stanford’s faculty in 1977 as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. He rose through the academic ranks to full professorship in 1986 and was the inaugural Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1987 to 2004.

    From 1983 to 1993, Dr. Hennessy was director of the Computer Systems Laboratory, a research and teaching center operated by the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science that fosters research in computer systems design. He served as chair of computer science from 1994 to 1996 and, in 1996, was named dean of the School of Engineering. As dean, he launched a five-year plan that laid the groundwork for new activities in bioengineering and biomedical engineering. In 1999, he was named provost, the university’s chief academic and financial officer. As provost, he continued his efforts to foster interdisciplinary activities in the biosciences and bioengineering and oversaw improvements in faculty and staff compensation. In October 2000, he was inaugurated as Stanford University’s 10th president, a position he held until 2016. In 2016, he cofounded the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program, which provides scholarships and leadership development for a global community of scholars enrolled in graduate programs at Stanford. The program admitted it's first class in 2018 and will provide full scholarships for up to 100 100 students every year.

    A pioneer in computer architecture, in 1981 Dr. Hennessy drew together researchers to focus on a computer architecture known as RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer), a technology that has revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing costs. In addition to his role in the basic research, Dr. Hennessy helped transfer this technology to industry. In 1984, he cofounded MIPS Computer Systems, now MIPS Technologies, which designs microprocessors. In recent years, his research has focused on the architecture of high-performance computers.

    Dr. Hennessy is a recipient of the 2000 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, the 2000 ASEE Benjamin Garver Lamme Award, the 2001 ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award, the 2001 Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering, a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 2012 IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE's highest award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, and he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

    He has lectured and published widely and is the co-author of two internationally used undergraduate and graduate textbooks on computer architecture design. Dr. Hennessy earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Villanova University and his master’s and doctoral degrees in computer science from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

  • Lambertus Hesselink

    Lambertus Hesselink

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioHesselink's research encompasses nano-photonics, ultra high density optical data storage, nonlinear optics, optical super-resolution, materials science, three-dimensional image processing and graphics, and Internet technologies.

  • Mark Horowitz

    Mark Horowitz

    Yahoo! Founders Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Computer Science

    BioProfessor Horowitz initially focused on designing high-performance digital systems by combining work in computer-aided design tools, circuit design, and system architecture. During this time, he built a number of early RISC microprocessors, and contributed to the design of early distributed shared memory multiprocessors. In 1990, Dr. Horowitz took leave from Stanford to help start Rambus Inc., a company designing high-bandwidth memory interface technology. After returning in 1991, his research group pioneered many innovations in high-speed link design, and many of today’s high speed link designs are designed by his former students or colleagues from Rambus.

    In the 2000s he started a long collaboration with Prof. Levoy on computation photography, that included work that led to the Lytro camera. Dr. Horowitz's current research interests are quite broad and span using EE and CS analysis methods to problems in neuro and molecular biology to creating new agile design methodologies for analog and digital VLSI circuits. He remains interested in learning new things, and building interdisciplinary teams.

  • Roger Howe

    Roger Howe

    William E. Ayer Professor in Electrical Engineering

    BioDesign and fabrication of sensors and actuators using micro and nanotechnologies, with applications to information processing and energy conversion.

  • Umran Inan

    Umran Inan

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioThrough measurements in space and at multiple remote sites in Antarctica, Alaska, and the continental United States, Professor Inan studies the Earth's ionosphere and upper atmosphere. Of particular interest are ionospheric effects of lightning discharges and the recently discovered phenomena of electrical discharges and luminous glows at high altitudes above thunderstorms. He also studies physical processes in the Earth's near-space environment, including space weather effects on navigation and communication signals, electrodynamic coupling of the ionosphere to the magnetosphere, wave-induced precipitation of particles out of the radiation belts, and cyclotron resonant interactions between electromagnetic waves and energetic electrons. He is also involved in the development of ultra-low-power and miniaturized radio receivers for use in remote polar regions and on micro-satellites.

  • Hanlee P. Ji

    Hanlee P. Ji

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCancer genomics and genetics, translational applications of next generation sequencing technologies, development of molecular signatures as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in oncology, primary genomic and proteomic technology development, cancer rearrangements, genome sequencing, big data analysis

  • Ramesh Johari

    Ramesh Johari

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioJohari is broadly interested in the design, economic analysis, and operation of online platforms, as well as statistical and machine learning techniques used by these platforms (such as search, recommendation, matching, and pricing algorithms).

  • Joseph Kahn

    Joseph Kahn

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioJoseph M. Kahn is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His research addresses communication and imaging through optical fibers, including modulation, detection, signal processing and spatial multiplexing. He received A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from U.C. Berkeley in 1981 and 1986. From 1987-1990, he was at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Crawford Hill Laboratory, in Holmdel, NJ. He was on the Electrical Engineering faculty at U.C. Berkeley from 1990-2003. In 2000, he co-founded StrataLight Communications, which was acquired by Opnext, Inc. in 2009. He received the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1991 and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

  • Thomas Kailath

    Thomas Kailath

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioThomas Kailath obtained a B.E.(Telecom) degree from the College of Engineering in Pune, India, in !956 and M.S. (1959) and Sc.D. (1961) degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    After a year at the Jet Propulsion Laboratories, he joined Stanford University in 1963 as an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, was promoted to Professor in 1968, and named to the Hitachi America Chair in 1988. He assumed Emeritus status in June 2001. His research has spanned a large number of engineering and mathematical disciplines, and he has mentored over a hundred doctoral and postdoctoral students. Their joint efforts have led to over 300 journal papers, several of which have received outstanding paper prizes; they have also led to a dozen patents and to several books and monographs. He has also co-founded and served as a director of several private and public high-technology companies. and has been

    He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Indian National Academy of Engineering, the Academy of Sciences of the Developing World and the Royal Spanish Academy of Engineering. In 2006, he was inducted into the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame.

    Other major honors include several IEEE medals and prizes, including the 2007 Medal of Honor in 2007, Guggenheim and Churchill Fellowships, and honorary degrees from universities in Sweden, Scotland, Spain and France.

  • Sachin Katti

    Sachin Katti

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioSachin Katti is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University. He recently received his PhD in EECS from MIT in 2009. His research focuses on designing and building next generation high capacity wireless networks using techniques from information and coding theory. His dissertation research focused on redesigning wireless mesh networks with network coding as the central unifying design paradigm. The dissertation won the 2008 ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award - Honorable Mention, the George Sprowls Award for Best Doctoral Dissertation in EECS at MIT. His work on network coding was also awarded a MIT Deshpande Center Innovation Grant, and won the 2009 William Bennett Prize for Best Paper in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. His research interests are in networks, wireless communications, applied coding theory and security.

  • Leonid Kazovsky

    Leonid Kazovsky

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Kazovsky and his research group are investigating green energy-efficient networks. The focus of their research is on access and in-building networks and on hybrid optical / wireless networks. Prof. Kazovsky's research group is also conducting research on next-generation Internet architectures and novel zero-energy photonic components.

  • Oussama Khatib

    Oussama Khatib

    Weichai Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering and of Electrical Engineering

    BioRobotics research on novel control architectures, algorithms, sensing, and human-friendly designs for advanced capabilities in complex environments. With a focus on enabling robots to interact cooperatively and safely with humans and the physical world, these studies bring understanding of human movements for therapy, athletic training, and performance enhancement. Our work on understanding human cognitive task representation and physical skills is enabling transfer for increased robot autonomy. With these core capabilities, we are exploring applications in healthcare and wellness, industry and service, farms and smart cities, and dangerous and unreachable settings -- deep in oceans, mines, and space.

  • Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioButrus (Pierre) T. Khuri-Yakub is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received the BS degree from the American University of Beirut, the MS degree from Dartmouth College, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University, all in electrical engineering. His current research interests include medical ultrasound imaging and therapy, ultrasound neuro-stimulation, chemical/biological sensors, gas flow and energy flow sensing, micromachined ultrasonic transducers, and ultrasonic fluid ejectors. He has authored over 600 publications and has been principal inventor or co-inventor of 107 US and international issued patents. He was awarded the Medal of the City of Bordeaux in 1983 for his contributions to Nondestructive Evaluation, the Distinguished Advisor Award of the School of Engineering at Stanford University in 1987, the Distinguished Lecturer Award of the IEEE UFFC society in 1999, a Stanford University Outstanding Inventor Award in 2004, Distinguished Alumnus Award of the School of Engineering of the American University of Beirut in 2005, Stanford Biodesign Certificate of Appreciation for commitment to educate, mentor and inspire Biodesgin Fellows, 2011, and 2011 recipient of IEEE Rayleigh award.

  • Gregory Kovacs

    Gregory Kovacs

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis present research areas include instruments for biomedical and biological applications including space flight, solid-state sensors and actuators, cell-based sensors for toxin detection and pharmaceutical screening, microfluidics, electronic interfaces to tissue, and biotechnology, all with emphasis on solving practical problems.

  • Christoforos Kozyrakis

    Christoforos Kozyrakis

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioChristos Kozyrakis research focuses on making computer system of any size faster, cheaper, and greener. His current work focuses on the hardware architecture, runtime environment, programming models, and security infrastructure for warehouse-scale data centers and many-core chips with thousands of general purpose cores and fixed functions accelerators.

  • Sanjay Lall

    Sanjay Lall

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioSanjay Lall is Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory and Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. He received a B.A. degree in Mathematics with first-class honors in 1990 and a Ph.D. degree in Engineering in 1995, both from the University of Cambridge, England. His research group focuses on algorithms for control, optimization, and machine learning. Before joining Stanford he was a Research Fellow at the California Institute of Technology in the Department of Control and Dynamical Systems, and prior to that he was a NATO Research Fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems. He was also a visiting scholar at Lund Institute of Technology in the Department of Automatic Control. He has significant industrial experience applying advanced algorithms to problems including satellite systems, advanced audio systems, Formula 1 racing, the America's cup, cloud services monitoring, and integrated circuit diagnostic systems, in addition to several startup companies. Professor Lall has served as Associate Editor for the journal Automatica, on the steering and program committees of several international conferences, and as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation, DARPA, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. He is the author of over 130 peer-refereed publications.

  • Monica Lam

    Monica Lam

    Professor of Computer Science, & by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Monica Lam is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and the Faculty Director of the Stanford MobiSocial Laboratory. Dr. Monica Lam obtained her BS degree in computer science from University of British Columbia, and her PhD degree in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1987. She joined Stanford in 1988.

    Professor Lam’s research mission is to disrupt the status quo where centralized monopoly platforms are prevalent and consumers privacy is compromised. This challenging problem led her to ten years of research in many disciplines in computer science: natural language processing, machine learning, compilers, distributed systems, and human-computer interaction. She advocates the development of open-source virtual assistants that users can “program” in natural language; these assistants should be federated to give users choice and to support sharing without a centralized third party. Her research prototype demonstrates a viable open-source alternative to the emerging oligopoly of virtual assistants.

    Prof. Lam is also an expert in compilers for high-performance machines. Her pioneering work of affine partitioning provides a unifying theory to the field of loop transformations for parallelism and locality. Her software pipelining algorithm is used in commercial systems for instruction level parallelism. Her research team created the first, widely adopted research compiler, SUIF. She is a co-author of the classic compiler textbook, popularly known as the “dragon book”.

    Dr. Lam is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and an Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow.

  • Jin Hyung Lee

    Jin Hyung Lee

    Associate Professor of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn vivo visualization and control of neural circuits

  • Thomas Lee

    Thomas Lee

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Lee's principal areas of professional interest include analog circuitry of all types, ranging from low-level DC instrumentation to high-speed RF communications systems. His present research focus is on CMOS RF integrated circuit design, and on extending operation into the terahertz realm.

  • Craig Levin

    Craig Levin

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford/Nuclear Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Physics, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Imaging Instrumentation
    Laboratory

    Our research interests involve the development of novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of cellular and molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animal subjects.

  • Philip Levis

    Philip Levis

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Levis' research focuses on the design and implementation of efficient software systems for embedded wireless sensor networks; embedded network sensor architecture and design; systems programming and software engineering.

  • David Luckham

    David Luckham

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor (Research) Emeritus of Electrical Engineering.
    Research Professor of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 1977 to 2003.
    Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow, Harvard University, 1976.
    Senior Research Associate, Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, 1972-1977.
    Associate Professor, UCLA Computer Science Department, 1970-1972.

    Professor Luckham's research and consulting activities in software technology include multi-processing and business processing languages, event-driven systems, complex event processing, commercial middleware, program verification, systems architecture modelling and simulation, and artificial intelligence (automated deduction and reasoning systems).

    Prof. Luckham has held faculty and invited faculty positions in both mathematics and computer science at eight major universities in Europe and the United States. He has been an invited lecturer, keynote speaker, panelist, and USA delegate at many international conferences and congresses. Until 1999 he was a member of the Computer Systems Laboratory, Stanford University and directed the Program Analysis and Verification Project. He taught courses on Artifical Intelligence and automated deduction, programming languages and program verification, the Anna verification system, systems prototyping and simulation languages, and Complex Event Processing. He was one of the founders of Rational Software, Inc. in 1981.

    In the past he has served on review committees during the DoD Ada Language design competition, and was a Distinguished Reviewer on the DoD Ada9X design project. In 1993-94 he was a member of the TRW Independent Assessment Team tasked with reviewing the FAA's Advanced Automation System for the FAA, and in 1994-96 he was a distinguished reviewer for the DoD High Level Language for modelling and simulation. He has published four books and over 100 technical papers; two ACM/IEEE Best Paper Awards, several papers are now in historical anthologies and book collections. His 2002 book is a benchmark introduction to complex event processing, "The Power of Events" . His 2012 book , "Event Processing for Business" documents current applications of Complex Event Processing in many areas of Information Technology.

  • Nick McKeown

    Nick McKeown

    Kleiner Perkins, Mayfield, and Sequoia Capital Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Computer Science

    BioMcKeown researches techniques to improve the Internet. Most of this work has focused on the architecture, design, analysis, and implementation of high-performance Internet switches and routers. More recently, his interests have broadened to include network architecture, backbone network design, congestion control; and how the Internet might be redesigned if we were to start with a clean slate.

  • Teresa Meng

    Teresa Meng

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor in Electrical Engineering and Professor of Computer Science, Emerita

    BioTeresa H. Meng is the Reid Weaver Dennis Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emerita, at Stanford University. Her research activities in the first 10 years focused on low-power circuit and system design, video signal processing, and wireless communications. In 1998, Prof. Meng took leave from Stanford and founded Atheros Communications, Inc., which developed semiconductor system solutions for wireless network communications products. After returning to Stanford in 2000 to continue her teaching and research, Prof. Meng turned her research interest to applying signal processing and IC design to bio-medical engineering. She collaborated with Prof. Krishna Shenoy on neural signal processing and neural prosthetic systems. She also directed a research group exploring wireless power transfer and implantable bio-medical devices. Prof. Meng retired from Stanford in 2013.

  • David Miller

    David Miller

    W.M. Keck Foundation Professor of Electrical Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDavid Miller’s research interests include the use of optics in switching, interconnection, communications, computing, and sensing systems, physics and applications of quantum well optics and optoelectronics, and fundamental features and limits for optics and nanophotonics in communications and information processing.

  • John Mitchell

    John Mitchell

    Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Education

    BioJohn Mitchell is the Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor, professor of computer science, and by courtesy professor of electrical engineering and professor of education. He was previously appointed as Stanford Vice Provost for Online Learning (2012-2015) and Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (2015-2018). His team worked with more than 500 Stanford faculty members and instructors on over 1,000 online projects for campus or public audiences and organized the Year of Learning to envision the future of teaching and learning at Stanford and beyond. As co-director of the Lytics Lab and Carta Lab, he worked to improve educational outcomes through data-driven research and iterative design.

    Recent interviews and articles for the general public include: The Ethics of Emerging Technologies (podcast with Tom Byers and Mildred Cho), Aspen Institute Forum for the Future of Higher Education Interview Series - John Mitchell, and School of Engineering Interviews ”How can we improve online learning?” and “How can we design for security?.”

    Mitchell’s past research has focused on computer security, including network protocols, web security, and privacy, as well as programming languages and applications of mathematical logic to computer science. Relevant publications include Reinforcement Learning for the Adaptive Scheduling of Educational Activities (CHI 2020), Automated Analysis of Cryptographic Assumptions in Generic Group Models (J. Cryptology, 2019), Evaluating the privacy properties of telephone metadata (PNAS 2016), Third-party web tracking: Policy and technology (IEEE S&P). He is the author of two textbooks, Foundations for Programming Languages (1996) and Concepts in Programming Languages (2002); over 200 publications have received over 25,000 citations.

    Mitchell’s first research project in online learning started in 2009, when he and six undergraduate students built Stanford CourseWare, an innovative platform that expanded to support interactive video and discussion. CourseWare served as the foundation for initial flipped classroom experiments at Stanford and helped inspire the first massive open online courses (MOOCs) from Stanford. Professor Mitchell currently serves as Chair of the Stanford Department of Computer Science.

  • Andrea Montanari

    Andrea Montanari

    Robert and Barbara Kleist Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Mathematics

    BioI am interested in developing efficient algorithms to make sense of large amounts of noisy data, extract information from observations, estimate signals from measurements. This effort spans several disciplines including statistics, computer science, information theory, machine learning.
    I am also working on applications of these techniques to healthcare data analytics.

  • Boris Murmann

    Boris Murmann

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioBoris Murmann is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 2004 after completing his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. From 1994 to 1997, he was with Neutron Microelectronics, Germany, where he developed low-power and smart-power ASICs in automotive CMOS technology. Since 2004, he has worked as a consultant with numerous Silicon Valley companies. Dr. Murmann’s research interests are in mixed-signal integrated circuit design, with special emphasis on sensor interfaces, data converters and custom circuits for machine learning. In 2008, he was a co-recipient of the Best Student Paper Award at the VLSI Circuits Symposium and a recipient of the Best Invited Paper Award at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC). He received the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2009 and the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award in 2012. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, as well as the Data Converter Subcommittee Chair and the Technical Program Chair of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the faculty director of Stanford's System Prototyping Facility (SPF). He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

  • Sandy Napel

    Sandy Napel

    Professor of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Medical Informatics) and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research seeks to advance the clinical and basic sciences in radiology, while improving our understanding of biology and the manifestations of disease, by pioneering methods in the information sciences that integrate imaging, clinical and molecular data. A current focus is on content-based radiological image retrieval and integration of imaging features with clinical and molecular data for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapy planning decision support.

  • Yoshio Nishi

    Yoshio Nishi

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsresistive switching nonvolatile memory mechanism, and 2D materials and devices

  • Dwight Nishimura

    Dwight Nishimura

    Addie and Al Macovski Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmedical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging

  • Paul Nuyujukian

    Paul Nuyujukian

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group explores neuroengineering and its application to both basic and clinical neuroscience. Our goal is to develop brain-machine interfaces as a platform technology for a variety of brain-related medical conditions including stroke and epilepsy.

  • Kunle Olukotun

    Kunle Olukotun

    Cadence Design Systems Professor and Professor of Electrical Engineering
    On Leave from 01/01/2021 To 03/31/2021

    BioKunle Olukotun is the Cadence Design Systems Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University. Olukotun is well known as a pioneer in multicore processor design and the leader of the Stanford Hydra chip multiprocessor (CMP) research project. Olukotun founded Afara Websystems to develop high-throughput, low-power multicore processors for server systems. The Afara multicore processor, called Niagara, was acquired by Sun Microsystems. Niagara derived processors now power all Oracle SPARC-based servers. Olukotun currently directs the Stanford Pervasive Parallelism Lab (PPL), which seeks to proliferate the use of heterogeneous parallelism in all application areas using Domain Specific Languages (DSLs).

  • Simona Onori

    Simona Onori

    Assistant Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModeling, control and optimization of dynamic systems;
    Model-based control in advanced propulsion systems;
    Energy management control and optimization in HEVs and PHEVs;
    Energy storage systems- Li-ion and PbA batteries, Supercapacitors;
    Battery aging modeling, state of health estimation and life prediction for control;
    Damage degradation modeling in interconnected systems

  • Brad Osgood

    Brad Osgood

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Education

    BioOsgood is a mathematician by training and applies techniques from analysis and geometry to various engineering problems. He is interested in problems in imaging, pattern recognition, and signal processing.