Graduate School of Education


Showing 1-100 of 124 Results

  • Fernando Amaral Carnauba

    Fernando Amaral Carnauba

    Assistant Professor (Teaching) at the Graduate School of Education

    BioFernando Carnauba received his doctoral degree in Mathematics Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. He earned an MA in Economics at the University of São Paulo and an MA in Mathematics Education at Teachers College. Fernando currently works on deepening teacher education programs with a network of 20 Brazilian universities. In partnership with the Lemann Center at Stanford GSE, this network develops and offers professional development programs in Mathematics and Science to public school teachers in Brazil.

  • Subini Ancy Annamma

    Subini Ancy Annamma

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioPrior to her doctoral studies, Subini Ancy Annamma was a special education teacher in both public schools and youth prisons. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Her research critically examines the ways students are criminalized and resist that criminalization through the mutually constitutive nature of racism and ableism, how they interlock with other marginalizing oppressions, and how these intersections impact youth education trajectories in urban schools and youth prisons. Further, she positions students as knowledge generators, exploring how their narratives can inform teacher and special education. Dr. Annamma’s book, The Pedagogy of Pathologization (Routledge, 2018) focuses on the education trajectories of incarcerated disabled girls of color and has won the 2019 AESA Critic’s Choice Book Award & 2018 NWSA Alison Piepmeier Book Prize. Dr. Annamma is a past Ford Postdoctoral Fellow, AERA Division G Early Career Awardee, Critical Race Studies in Education Associate Emerging Scholar recipient, Western Social Science Association's Outstanding Emerging Scholar, and AERA Minority Dissertation Awardee. Dr. Annamma’s work has been published in scholarly journals such as Educational Researcher, Teachers College Record, Review of Research in Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Theory Into Practice, Race Ethnicity and Education, Qualitative Inquiry, among others.

  • anthony lising antonio

    anthony lising antonio

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransitions to postsecondary education; racial, ethnic, and religious minority college student development.

  • Lucas Arribas Layton

    Lucas Arribas Layton

    Lecturer

    BioLucas Arribas Layton brings over 20 years of experience working in the fields of education and international development mainly with World Bank and the US Government. Mr Arribas Layton is a dual national, born in Spain and raised between rural Castilla and urban California, where he arrived as a three-year old. Mr. Arribas Layton started his career as a public-school teacher while at Harvard University, but soon yielded to the call of international service, joining the Peace Corps as a family hillside farming extentionist in Honduras. He earned a Master’s degree and also meet his wife, Janet Holt, at Stanford, in the International Comparative Education program, focusing on bilingual intercultural education of the Mapuche in Chile. Mr Arribas Layton served in Peace Corps again, this time with his wife in Mozambique, as Portuguese speaking secondary school teachers. Mr Arribas Layton holds a PhD, conferred by UCLA for research on Education for Sustainable Development in India. He has worked for the World Bank, supporting education projects in South Sudan and Ethiopia, and returned to work for the Peace Corps as a programming specialist at headquarters in Washington DC and then as overseas staff on the tropical Pacific islands of Micronesia. He most recently worked for Room to Read, San Francisco, supporting libraries, literacy, and girls’ education in Southeast Asia, South Asia, and, Africa, and the US Government, as a Foreign Service Officer awaiting assignment to Zambia. Mr. Arribas Layton is a proud father of three children: 3rd grader Isabel, 1st grader Thomas, and little Gabriel, now three and full of vim and vigor. Mr Arribas Layton loves family, discovering history, exploring diverse geographies and cultures, and striving for a more sustainable and peaceful future.

  • Alfredo J. Artiles

    Alfredo J. Artiles

    Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education

    BioDr. Artiles is the Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education. His scholarship examines the dual nature of disability as an object of protection and a tool of stratification. Professor Artiles studies how protections afforded by disability status can unwittingly stratify educational opportunities for racialized groups and is advancing responses to these inequities. For instance, he is studying the cultural-historical contexts of racial disparities in special education and whether a disability diagnosis is associated with differential consequences for minoritized groups (e.g., segregation, quality and type of services). He and his colleagues have led national and regional technical assistance initiatives at the state and school district levels to address these equity paradoxes. Current research projects include:

    * Examining the role of socio-cultural influences (e.g., histories of racial inequities in communities and schools) in educators’ interpretations and responses to chronic school district citations for racial disparities in special education.
    * Mapping the changing meanings of “disability” and “inclusive education” and the ways in which disability-race intersections become visible or invisible across identification policies, practices and settings at the district and school levels.
    * Piloting a participatory model with youth of color with/without disabilities grounded in the arts and humanities to (re)structure school discipline policies and practices.
    * Documenting how teachers and other school professionals decide whether dual language learners' academic or behavioral difficulties are related to disabilities.
    * Analyzing equity consequences of inclusive education implementation in Global South nations.

    Dr. Artiles received an honorary doctorate from the University of Göteborgs (Sweden) and is Honorary Professor at the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom). He served on the Obama White House Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. Dr. Artiles is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the National Academy of Education and Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), the Learning Policy Institute and the National Education Policy Center. He was a resident fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He was elected AERA Vice-President to lead its Social Context of Education Division. Dr. Artiles has received numerous awards for his scholarly work and mentoring activities, including AERA’s Palmer O. Johnson Award, the AERA Review of Research Award, and Mentoring Awards from AERA’s Division on Social Contexts of Education, the Spencer Foundation, and Arizona State University. He was selected Distinguished Alumni from the University of Virginia School of Education. Professor Artiles has served on consensus study panels of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine focusing on English learners, the Future of Educational Research, and Opportunity Gaps for Young Children.

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, and a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment. He has served as Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Communication for over a decade. He earned a B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford. In 2020, IEEE recognized his work with “The Virtual/Augmented Reality Technical Achievement Award”.

    He has published more than 200 academic papers, spanning the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, linguistics, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for over 25 years.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, emerged as an Amazon Best-seller eight years after its initial publication, and was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, TechCrunch, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed six Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab has exhibited VR in hundreds of venues ranging from The Smithsonian to The Superbowl.

  • Arnetha F. Ball

    Arnetha F. Ball

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLanguage, Literacies, and Studies in Teacher Professional Development; research on the writing and writing instruction of culturally and linguistically diverse students; preparing teachers to teach diverse student populations in culturally and linguistically complex classrooms; linking sociocultural and linguistic theory to educational practice; and using the linguistic resources present among culturally diverse populations to enhance curriculum and instruction. She is currently conducting research on the implementation of her "Model of Generative Change" (Ball 2009) in pre-service teacher education, inservice teacher professional development, and a secondary pipeline program designed to "grow our own next generation of excellent teachers for urban schools." Over the last few years she has been collecting data in New Zealand, South Africa, Australia, and the United States on the preparation of teachers to work with historically marginalized populations. Her research on the use of writing as a pedagogical tool to facilitate generative thinking is ongoing and her most recent project looks at the development of blended online learning environments that are designed to prepare teachers to work effectively with diverse student populations in transnational contexts.

  • Adam Banks

    Adam Banks

    Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of African and African American Studies

    BioCommitted teacher. Midnight Believer. A Slow Jam in a Hip Hop world. Cerebral and silly, outgoing and a homebody. Vernacular and grounded but academic and idealistic too. Convinced that Donny Hathaway is the most compelling artist of the entire soul and funk era, and that we still don't give Patrice Rushen enough love. I'm a crate digger, and DJ with words and ideas, and I believe that the people, voices and communities we bring with us to Stanford are every bit as important as those with which we engage here at Stanford.

    Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, I come to Stanford from the University of Kentucky, where I served on the faculty of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies and prior to that, from Syracuse University, as a member of the faculty of the Writing Program. In addition to these appointments I served as the Langston Hughes Visiting Professor of English at the University of Kansas and, jointly with Andrea Lunsford, as the Rocky Gooch Visiting Professor for the Bread Loaf School of English.

    My scholarship lies at the intersections of writing, rhetoric and technology issues; my specialized interests include African American rhetoric, community literacy, digital rhetorics and digital humanities. My most recent book is titled Digital Griots: African American Rhetoric in a Multimedia Age, and my current digital/book project is titled Technologizing Funk/Funkin Technology: Critical Digital Literacies and the Trope of the Talking Book.

  • Ralph Banks

    Ralph Banks

    The Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law, Professor, by courtesy, of Education and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    BioRalph Richard Banks (BA ’87, MA ’87) is the Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor, by courtesy, at the School of Education. A native of Cleveland, Ohio and a graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Law School (JD 1994), Banks has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 1998. Prior to joining the law school, he practiced law at O’Melveny & Myers, was the Reginald F. Lewis Fellow at Harvard Law School and clerked for a federal judge, the Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. (then of the Southern District of New York). Professor Banks teaches and writes about family law, employment discrimination law and race and the law. He is the author of Is Marriage for White People? How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone. At Stanford, he is affiliated with the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and the Ethnicity, the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. His writings have appeared in a wide range of popular and scholarly publications, including the Stanford Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. He has been interviewed and quoted by numerous print and broadcast media, including ABC News/Nightline, National Public Radio, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

  • Brigid Barron

    Brigid Barron

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include the longitudinal documentation of learner pathways to engagement, studies of families as technology-supported learning teams, and the roles that personal learning networks play in catalyzing and sustaining interest-driven learning She is founder of the YouthLAB at Stanford, and a co-lead of TELOS, a Stanford Graduate School of Education Initiative to investigate how technologies can provide more equitable access to learning opportunities.

  • Eric Bettinger

    Eric Bettinger

    Conley DeAngelis Family Professor, Professor of Education, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEric's research interests include economics of education; student success and completion in college; the impacts of online education; the impacts of financial aid; teacher characteristics and student success in college; effects of voucher programs on both academic and non-academic outcomes. His research focuses on using rigorous statistical methods in identifying cause-and-effect relationships in higher education.

  • Jo Boaler

    Jo Boaler

    Nomellini and Olivier Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudying the Impact of a Mathematical Mindset Summer Intervention, HapCaps: Design and Validation of Haptic Devices for improving Finger Perception (with engineering & neuroscience) The effectiveness of a student online class (https://lagunita.stanford.edu/courses/Education/EDUC115-S/Spring2014/about) (NSF). Studies on mathematics and mindset with Carol Dweck and Greg Walton (various funders). Studying an online network and it's impact on teaching and learning (Gates foundation)

  • Hilda Borko

    Hilda Borko

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsToward a Scalable Model of Mathematics Professional Development: A Field Study of Preparing Facilitators to Implement the Problem-Solving Cycle

    The Problem-Solving Cycle (PSC) model of mathematics professional development encourages teachers to become part of a collaborative and supportive learning community. As they participate in the PSC, teachers think deeply about both mathematics content and instruction, and they explore their instructional practices with their colleagues through the use of video and other classroom artifacts. One iteration of the PSC consists of three interconnected professional development workshops, all organized around a rich mathematical task. During Workshop 1, teachers collaboratively solve the mathematical task and develop plans for teaching it to their own students. Shortly after the workshop, the teachers implement the problem with their own students and their lessons are videotaped. In Workshop 2 teachers explore the role they played in implementing the problem. In Workshop 3 teachers critically examine students’ mathematical reasoning.

    The Problem-Solving Cycle model provides a structure for mathematics teachers to work together and share a common mathematical and pedagogical experience. Our previous research suggests that it is a promising model for enhancing teachers’ knowledge and supporting changes in classroom practice.

    In our current project, initiated in Fall 2007, we are working with a group of middle school mathematics teachers in a large urban district to foster their leadership capacity, and specifically to prepare them to facilitate the Problem-Solving Cycle. We will provide 2½ years of preparation and support for teachers who have been designated as “mathematics instructional leaders.” These instructional leaders will in turn implement the PSC with the mathematics teachers in their schools. We will document the range and quality of the instructional leaders’ implementation of the PSC. We will also analyze the impact of the professional development process on the mathematical knowledge and classroom teaching of the instructional leaders and the mathematics teachers with whom they work. In addition, we will analyze the impact on their students’ mathematics achievement. By the conclusion of the project, we anticipate that the participating schools will have the infrastructure and capacity to carry out the PSC indefinitely, using their own resources. In addition, the project will produce a highly refined set of PSC facilitation materials—with a strong emphasis on supporting a linguistically and culturally diverse student population—that can be widely disseminated.

  • Bryan Brown

    Bryan Brown

    Kamalachari Professor of Science Education and Vice Provost for Faculty Development, Diversity and Engagement

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Brown's current research examines issues of stress, culture, and language. His work examines how science is taught is ways that may alienate urban students due to the approach to language instruction. This work includes experimental work involving technology based education and inner city teaching practices.

  • Eamonn Callan

    Eamonn Callan

    Pigott Family School of Education Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCivic and moral education; ethical and civic dimensions of educational policy; multicultural education and minority rights in education.

  • Janet Carlson

    Janet Carlson

    Associate Professor (Research) of Education
    On Partial Leave from 06/01/2024 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) for teaching science, design of professional learning for teachers including equity, core practices, teacher leadership, research-practice partnerships

  • Martin Carnoy

    Martin Carnoy

    Lemann Foundation Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearching econometric models of quality of education in Latin America and Southern Africa. Studying changes in university financing and the quality of engineering and science tertiary education in China, India, and Russia.

  • Lisa J. Chamberlain

    Lisa J. Chamberlain

    Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChild Health disparities - Projects focus on elucidating the non-clinical factors that impact access to appropriate care for children with chronic illness.

    Health Policy - Projects explore the intersection of medicine as a profession and formation of child health policy.

  • Anne Harper Charity Hudley

    Anne Harper Charity Hudley

    Associate Dean of Educational Affairs, Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education and, Professor, by courtesy, of Linguistics

    BioAnne H. Charity Hudley, Ph.D., is Associate Dean of Educational Affairs and Professor of Education at Stanford University and Professor of African-American Studies and Linguistics by courtesy. She is affiliated with the Center for Comparative Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) and the Symbolic Systems Program. Her research and publications address the relationship between language variation and educational practices and policies from preschool through graduate school. She has a particular emphasis on creating high-impact practices for underrepresented students in higher education. Charity Hudley is the co-author of four books: The Indispensable Guide to Undergraduate Research; We Do Language: English Language Variation in the Secondary English Classroom, and Understanding English Language Variation in U.S. Schools, and Talking College, Making Space for Black Linguistic Practices in Higher Education.

    Her other publications have appeared in Language, The Journal of English Linguistics, Child Development, Language Variation, and Change, American Speech, Language and Linguistics Compass, Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, and many book collections, including The Handbook of African-American Psychology, Ethnolinguistic Diversity and Literacy Education, Oxford Handbook of Sociolinguistics, and Oxford Handbook of Language in Society. She has been an invited speaker for numerous keynotes and academic meetings, provides lectures and workshops for K-12 teachers, and generously contributes to community initiatives and public intellectual work.

    Dean Charity Hudley is a fellow of the Linguistic Society of America and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Her contributions have been recognized with a Public Engagement Award from the Society for Linguistic Anthropology, an award from the Linguistic Society of America, and funding from NIH, NSF, the Mellon Foundation, and the Ford Foundation, among others. Professor Charity Hudley has served on the Executive Committee of the Linguistic Society of America; the Standing Committee on Research of the National Council of Teachers of English; as a consultant to the National Research Council Committee on Language and Education; and to the NSF’s Committee on Broadening Participation in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Sciences. In addition, she has served as an Associate Editor for Language and on the editorial board of Language and Linguistics Compass and the Linguistic Society of America Committee on Linguistics in Higher Education.

    Dr. Charity Hudley was previously the North Hall Endowed Chair in the Linguistics of African America at U.C. Santa Barbara. At UC Santa Barbara, she also served as the Director of Undergraduate Research, Vice-Chair of the Council of Planning and Budget, and a Faculty Fellow for the Center for Innovative Teaching, Research, and Learning (CITRAL).

  • Geoffrey Cohen

    Geoffrey Cohen

    James G. March Professor of Organizational Studies in Education and Business, Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMuch of my research examines processes related to identity maintenance and their implications for social problems. One primary aim of my research is the development of theory-driven, rigorously tested intervention strategies that further our understanding of the processes underpinning social problems and that offer solutions to alleviate them. Two key questions lie at the core of my research: “Given that a problem exists, what are its underlying processes?” And, “Once identified, how can these processes be overcome?” One reason for this interest in intervention is my belief that a useful way to understand psychological processes and social systems is to try to change them. We also are interested in how and when seemingly brief interventions, attuned to underlying psychological processes, produce large and long-lasting psychological and behavioral change.

    The methods that my lab uses include laboratory experiments, longitudinal studies, content analyses, and randomized field experiments. One specific area of research addresses the effects of group identity on achievement, with a focus on under-performance and racial and gender achievement gaps. Additional research programs address hiring discrimination, the psychology of closed-mindedness and inter-group conflict, and psychological processes underlying anti-social and health-risk behavior.

  • William Damon

    William Damon

    Professor of Education and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment of purpose through the lifespan; educational methods for promoting purpose and the capacity for good work.

  • Linda Darling-Hammond

    Linda Darling-Hammond

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the School of Education, Emerita

    BioLinda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emeritus at Stanford University and founding president of the Learning Policy Institute, created to provide high-quality research for policies that enable equitable and empowering education for each and every child. At Stanford she founded the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education and served as faculty sponsor for the Stanford Teacher Education Program, which she helped to redesign.

    Darling-Hammond is past president of the American Educational Research Association and recipient of its awards for Distinguished Contributions to Research, Lifetime Achievement, Research Review, and Research-to-Policy. She is also a member of the American Association of Arts and Sciences and of the National Academy of Education. From 1994–2001, she was executive director of the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, whose 1996 report What Matters Most: Teaching for America’s Future was named one of the most influential reports affecting U.S. education in that decade. In 2006, Darling-Hammond was named one of the nation’s ten most influential people affecting educational policy. In 2008, she directed President Barack Obama's Education Policy Transition Team. She is currently President of the California State Board of Education.

    Darling-Hammond began her career as a public school teacher and co-founded both a preschool and a public high school. She served as Director of the RAND Corporation’s education program and as an endowed professor at Columbia University, Teachers College before coming to Stanford. She has consulted widely with federal, state and local officials and educators on strategies for improving education policies and practices and is the recipient of 14 honorary degrees in the U.S. and internationally. Among her more than 600 publications are a number of award-winning books, including The Right to Learn, Teaching as the Learning Profession, Preparing Teachers for a Changing World and The Flat World and Education: How America's Commitment will Determine our Future. She received an Ed.D. from Temple University (with highest distinction) and a B.A. from Yale University (magna cum laude).

  • Sean Darling-Hammond

    Sean Darling-Hammond

    Lecturer

    BioI am an Assistant Professor at UCLA in the departments of Community Health Sciences, Biostatistics, and Education Policy; a lecturer at Stanford's Graduate School of Education; and the Founder and Principal of BITJustice (Bend It To Justice) LLC.

    Approach:
    I seek to expand belonging and well-being by conducting research in two domains:
    1) identifying k-12 practices that reduce racial disparities in health, discipline, and academic performance
    2) identifying social policies that combat and sideline racial bias.
    I aim to eschew departmental and methodological silos by conducting research that bridges the fields of public health, education, psychology, law, and public policy. While I have conducted dozens of qualitative research projects and produced work in the critical race theory tradition, my research mainly employs quantitative and econometric methods to analyze large-scale data, understand drivers of population health, and elevate effective public policies (e.g., school-based restorative practices).

    Recent scholarship:
    A recent article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences elucidates a new mental health risk for Black students—that schools rapidly grow more punitive towards Black students in the first weeks of the school year. It also shows how early-year data can be used to detect—and target interventions towards—schools where racial disparities in discipline are likely to emerge. Another project (published by the Learning Policy Institute and under review at AERA Open) reviews millions of California public student records and finds evidence that student exposure to restorative practices may reduce exclusionary discipline, improve academic achievement, and reduce related racial disparities; and that school adoption may reduce school-wide victimization, misbehavior, gang membership, depression, and sleep deprivation, and may increase school climate and student GPA. Two related projects find that—for Black boys and Black girls—exposure to restorative practices is related to lower depressive symptom, suicidal ideation, and substance abuse rates. A final project using this data finds that Black male and female students who perceive their School Resource Officers as exhibiting racial bias have higher rates of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and psychological distress. I also conduct randomized controlled trials to evaluate means of combatting racial bias. A recent paper in Science Advances reports on a teacher-facing growth-mindset intervention that reduced racial disparities in teachers’ responses to student misbehavior. And a recent field experiment conducted in partnership with the City of Denver found that a scalable racial bias training enhanced public employees’ abilities to combat racial bias in the workplace and society.

    Scholarly Impact:
    My work has been published in Science Advances, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Nature Human Behavior; cited in over 700 peer reviewed articles; and referenced by the New York Times, the Washington Post, NBC, the Department of Education Regional Education Labs, and the House Judiciary Committee.

    Teaching:
    I have received strong student evaluations in four courses at UCLA (two in health program planning and evaluation, one in approaches to interdisciplinary scholarship, and one to empower students from underrepresented backgrounds to succeed in our comprehensive exam). While earning my PhD at UC Berkeley, I also served as an instructor for multiple statistics classes and received UC Berkeley’s “Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award.” Guided by cutting-edge psychological theory, I developed and piloted a package of practices and teaching materials which led multiple cohorts of under-represented minority students to realize minimum raw scores of 90% in statistics classes, and (according to anonymous, in-depth, post-surveys) to overcome many negative internalized beliefs and adopt a growth mindset.

  • Thomas Dee

    Thomas Dee

    Barnett Family Professor, Professor of Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    BioThomas S. Dee, Ph.D., is the Barnett Family Professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education (GSE), a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and the Faculty Director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities. His research focuses largely on the use of quantitative methods to inform contemporary issues of public policy and practice. The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) awarded his collaborative research the Raymond Vernon Memorial Award in 2015 and again in 2019. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Educational Research Journal, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Education Finance and Policy.

  • Dora Demszky

    Dora Demszky

    Assistant Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioDr. Demszky is an Assistant Professor in Education Data Science at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. She works on developing natural language processing methods to support equitable and student-centered instruction. She has developed tools to give feedback to teachers on dialogic instructional practices, to analyze representation in textbooks, measure the presence of dialect features in text, among others. Dr Demszky has received her PhD in Linguistics at Stanford University, supervised by Dr Dan Jurafsky. Prior to her PhD, Dr. Demszky received a BA summa cum laude from Princeton University in Linguistics with a minor in Computer Science.

  • Benjamin Domingue

    Benjamin Domingue

    Associate Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm interested in models for psychological measurement and their uses alongside applied statistical projects of all kinds.

  • Carol Dweck

    Carol Dweck

    Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioMy work bridges developmental psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology, and examines the self-conceptions people use to structure the self and guide their behavior. My research looks at the origins of these self-conceptions, their role in motivation and self-regulation, and their impact on achievement and interpersonal processes.

  • Thomas Ehrlich

    Thomas Ehrlich

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHe has just finished a book, written with a Stanford undergraduate as his co-author, about how and why young people should be involved in public service.

  • Philip Andrew Fisher

    Philip Andrew Fisher

    Excellence in Learning Graduate School of Education Professor

    BioDr. Philip Fisher is the Excellence in Learning Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford. His research, which has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1999, focuses on developing and evaluating scalable early childhood interventions in communities, and on translating scientific knowledge regarding healthy development under conditions of adversity for use in social policy and programs. He is particularly interested in the effects of early stressful experiences on children's neurobiological and psychological development, and in prevention and treatment programs for improving children's functioning in areas such as relationships with caregivers and peers, social-emotional development, and academic achievement. He is currently the lead investigator in the ongoing RAPID-EC project, a national survey on the well-being of households with young children during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Fisher is also interested in the brain's plasticity in the context of therapeutic interventions. He is the developer of a number of widely implemented evidence-based interventions for supporting healthy child development in the context of social and economic adversity, including Treatment Foster Care Oregon for Preschoolers (TFCO-P), Kids in Transition to School (KITS), and Filming Interactions to Nurture Development (FIND). He has published over 200 scientific papers in peer reviewed journals. He is the recipient of the 2012 Society for Prevention Research Translational Science Award, and a 2019 Fellow of the American Psychological Society.

  • Karin Forssell

    Karin Forssell

    Senior Lecturer of Education

    BioDr. Karin Forssell is the director of the Learning Design and Technology (LDT) master's program and senior lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Dr. Forssell also directs the GSE Makery, a Stanford maker space where students and faculty learn to make, and make to learn. In her courses, students learn to use research from the learning sciences and learning-centered design processes to create effective digital tools. Her current interests include maker space education, teacher technology adoption, and parenting in a digital world.

    Dr. Forssell draws insights from her many years of concurrent work as a teacher on special assignment for technology in the Palo Alto Unified School District. Dr. Forssell earned her bachelor's degree in linguistics, master's degree in education, and doctorate in learning sciences and technology design at Stanford University.

  • Antero Godina Garcia

    Antero Godina Garcia

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAntero's current research focuses on learning practices in gaming communities; critical literacies and civic identities in ELA classrooms; youth participatory action research; and sociocultural approaches to care and healing in classrooms.

  • Shelley Goldman

    Shelley Goldman

    Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and for Student Affairs and Professor (Teaching) of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUse and integration of digital technologies for teaching and learning; learning in informal settings, especially learning mathematics and science within families; bringing the tools and mindsets of design thinking to K-12 classrooms and to broadening STEM participation.

  • Pamela Grossman

    Pamela Grossman

    Nomellini-Olivier Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudy of classroom practice in middle school English Language Arts (with Susanna Loeb), funded by the Carnegie Corporation;

    Study of pathways into teaching in New York City Schools (with Don Boyd, Hamilton Lankford, Susanna Loeb, and Jim Wyckoff).

    Cross-professional study of the teaching of practice in programs to prepare teachers, clergy, and clinical psychologists (funded by the Spencer Foundation).

  • Patricia Gumport

    Patricia Gumport

    Professor of Education

    BioAs a sociologist of higher education, Dr. Gumport has focused her research and teaching on key changes in the academic landscape and organizational character of American higher education. She has studied the dynamics of academic change in several arenas — illuminating what facilitates change and what impedes it — across and within different types of colleges and universities. Extending core concerns in the sociology of knowledge and institutional theory, Dr. Gumport has analyzed how organizational, intellectual, political, economic, and professional interests redefine the content, structure, and relative legitimacy of academic fields. Specific studies include: the emergence and institutionalization of interdisciplinary fields; graduate education and professional socialization across academic disciplines; organizational restructuring and selective investment; the ascendance of industry logic in public higher education; forces that promote and inhibit academic collaboration; decision-making about appropriate organizational forms to support new ideas; and leading organizational change for optimal effectiveness with internal and external stakeholders. Her research within the United States and Europe examines how universities that are ostensibly competitors determine when and how to collaborate. Her analyses include implications for academic leaders who pursue strategic initiatives, manage environmental pressures and stakeholder interests, and seek leadership development opportunities.

  • Nicholas Haber

    Nicholas Haber

    Assistant Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use AI models of of exploratory and social learning in order to better understand early human learning and development, and conversely, I use our understanding of early human learning to make robust AI models that learn in exploratory and social ways. Based on this, I develop AI-powered learning tools for children, geared in particular towards the education of those with developmental issues such as the Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in the mold of my work on the Autism Glass Project. My formal graduate training in pure mathematics involved extending partial differential equation theory in cases involving the propagation of waves through complex media such as the space around a black hole. Since then, I have transitioned to the use of machine learning in developing both learning tools for children with developmental disorders and AI and cognitive models of learning.

  • Edward Haertel

    Edward Haertel

    Jacks Family Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunctions of test scores in discourse about education; how testing shapes ideas of success and failure for students, schools, and public education as a whole.

  • Eric Hanushek

    Eric Hanushek

    Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioEric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He is internationally recognized for his economic analysis of educational issues, and his research has broadly influenced education policy in both developed and developing countries. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field, he was awarded the prestigious Yidan Prize for Education Research in 2021. His extensive and well-cited body of work encompasses many pivotal topics within education, including class size reduction, school accountability, and teacher effectiveness. His pioneering exploration into teacher effectiveness, quantified through students' learning gains, laid the foundation for the widespread adoption of value-added measures in evaluating educators and institutions. His seminal book, The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth, establishes the close relationship between a nation's long-term economic growth and the skill levels of its populace. His scholarly contributions include twenty-six books and over 300 articles contributing to knowledge within the field. He is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and completed his Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (https://hanushek.stanford.edu/)

  • Michael Hines

    Michael Hines

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioMichael Hines is a historian of American education whose work concentrates on the educational activism of Black teachers, students, and communities during the Progressive Era (1890s-1940s). He is an Assistant Professor of Education, and an affiliated faculty member with the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He is the author of A Worthy Piece of Work (Beacon Press, 2022) which details how African Americans educator activists in the early twentieth century created new curricular discourses around race and historical representation. Dr. Hines has published six peer reviewed articles and book chapters in outlets including the Journal of African American History, History of Education Quarterly, Review of Educational Research, and the Journal of the History Childhood and Youth. He has also written for popular outlets including the Washington Post, Time magazine, and Chalkbeat. He teaches courses including History of Education in the U.S., and Education for Liberation: A History of African American Education, 1800-The Present.

  • Shashank V. Joshi, MD

    Shashank V. Joshi, MD

    Professor (Teaching) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development) and, by courtesy of Pediatrics and, of Education
    On Partial Leave from 10/15/2023 To 10/01/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Joshi's teaching and research focuses on increasing knowledge and effectiveness of school mental health, youth wellbeing, positive psychology, pediatric psychotherapy and medication interventions. Areas of study include: the therapeutic alliance in medical care, structured psychotherapy interventions, cultural issues in pediatrics, wellbeing promotion and suicide prevention in schools settings, and faculty development in graduate medical education.

  • Connie Juel

    Connie Juel

    Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPoor Reading in Preterms: Neural Basis, Prediction, & Response to Intervention (with Heidi Feldman & Michal Ben Shachar). Five-year grant funded by NICHD, 2012-2017.

    Effects of early elementary school instruction, and specific interventions, on literacy and language growth.

    Longitudinal study of literacy development from preschool through first grade. Focus on classroom factors in 13 kindergarten and 13 first grade classrooms that affect growth across the years in children with different entering skill and language profiles.

  • Ari Y. Kelman

    Ari Y. Kelman

    Jim Joseph Professor of Education and Jewish Studies and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Religious Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Kelman's research focuses on the forms and practices of religious knowledge transmission. His work emerges at the intersection of sociocultural learning theory and scholarly/critical studies of religion, and his methods draw on the social sciences and history. Currently Professor Kelman is at work on a variety of projects ranging from a history of religious education in the post-war period to an inquiry about Google's implicit definitions of religion.

  • William Koski

    William Koski

    The Eric and Nancy Wright Professor of Clinical Education and Professor (Teaching), by courtesy, of Education
    On Leave from 09/01/2023 To 08/31/2024

    BioAn accomplished clinical teacher and litigator, William Koski (PhD ’03) is the founder and director of the law school’s Youth and Education Law Project (YELP). He has also taught multidisciplinary graduate seminars and courses in educational law and policy.

    Professor Koski and YELP have represented hundreds of children, youth, and families in special education, student discipline, and other educational rights matters. Professor Koski has also served as lead counsel or co-counsel in several path-breaking complex school reform litigations including Robles-Wong v. California, that sought to reform the public school finance system in the state; Emma C. v. Eastin, that has restructured the special education service delivery system in a Bay Area school district and aims to reform the California Department of Education’s special education monitoring system; Smith v. Berkeley Unified School District, that successfully reformed the school discipline policies in Berkeley, CA; and Stephen C. v. Bureau of Indian Education, that seeks to hold the federal Bureau of Indian Education accountable for their failure to provide children in the Havasupai Native American tribe in Arizona with an adequate and equitable education.

    Reflecting his multidisciplinary background as a lawyer and social scientist, Professor Koski’s scholarly work focuses on the related issues of educational accountability, equity and adequacy; the politics of educational policy reform; teacher employment policies; and judicial decision-making in educational policy reform litigation.

    Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 2001, Professor Koski was a lecturer in law at Stanford and a supervising attorney at the law school’s East Palo Alto Community Law Project. He was also an associate at Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe and then Alden, Aronovsky & Sax.

    Professor Koski has an appointment (by courtesy) with the Stanford School of Education.

  • Elizabeth Bailey Kozleski

    Elizabeth Bailey Kozleski

    Professor (Research) of Education

    BioI engage in systems change and research on equity and justice issues in inclusive education in schools, school systems as well as state and national education organizations and agencies. My research interests include the analysis of systems change in education, how teachers learn in practice in complex, diverse school settings, including how educational practices improve student learning. Awards include the 2023 Luminary Award from the Division of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Children, Council of Exceptional Children; the 2018 Budig Award for Teaching Excellence in Special Education at the University of Kansas; the 2017 Boeing-Allan Visiting Endowed Chair at Seattle University; the University of Kansas 2016 Woman of Distinction award; the 2013 Scholar of the Century award from the University of Northern Colorado; the 2011 TED-Merrill award for leadership in special education teacher education in 2011; and the UNESCO Chair in Inclusive International Research. I co-lead the World Education Research Association International Research Network on Student Voice for Promoting Equity and Inclusion in Schools along with Professor Kyriaki Messiou of the University of South Hampton, UK.

    A number of my articles focus on the design and development of teacher education programs that involve extensive clinical practice in general education settings. I have led the development of such programs in three universities, and continue to do research and development work in teacher education. I have also offered technical assistance as well as conducted research on the impact of technical assistance on individuals, as well as local, state, and national systems in the U.S. and abroad.

    I have received funding for more than $35 million in federal, state, and local grants. I serve on the Board of Editors for the book series Inclusive Education and Partnerships, an international book series produced by Deep University. Recent books include Ability, Equity, and Culture (with co-author Kathleen King Thorius) published by Teachers College Press in ‘14 and Equity on Five Continents (with Alfredo Artiles and Federico Waitoller) published in ‘11 by Harvard Education Press.

  • David Labaree

    David Labaree

    Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMost Recent Book:

    My new book – A Perfect Mess: The Unlikely Ascendancy of American Higher Education – is an essay about the nature of the American system of higher education. American higher education is an anomaly. In the second half of the 20th century it surged past its European forebears to become the dominant system in the world – with more money, influence, Nobel prizes, and drawing power than any of the systems that served as its models. By all rights, this never should have happened. Its origins were remarkably humble, arising from a loose assortment of parochial 19th century liberal arts colleges, which emerged in the pursuit of sectarian expansion and civic boosterism more than scholarly distinction. It was not even a system in the usual sense of the word, since it emerged with no plan, no planner, no prospects, and no reliable source of support. Yet these weaknesses of the American system in the 19th century turned out to be strengths in the 20th. From the difficult circumstances of trying to survive in an environment with a weak state, a divided church, and intense competition with peer institutions, American colleges developed into a system of higher education that was lean, adaptable, consumer-sensitive, self-supporting, and radically decentralized. This put the system in a strong position to expand and prosper when, before the turn of the century, it finally got what it was most grievously lacking: academic credibility (which came when it adopted elements of the German research university) and large student enrollments (which came when middle class families started to see social advantage in sending their children to college).

    This system is extraordinarily complex, bringing together contradictory educational goals, a broad array political constituencies, diverse sources of funds, and multiple forms of authority into a single institutional arena characterized by creative tension and local autonomy. One tension is between the influence of the market and the influence of the state. Another arises from the conflict among three social-political visions of higher education – as undergraduate college (populist), graduate school (elite), and land grant college (practical). A third arises from the way the system combines three alternative modes of authority – traditional, rational, and charismatic. In combination, these elements promote organizational complexity, radical stratification, broad political and financial support, partial autonomy, and adaptive entrepreneurial behavior.

  • Teresa LaFromboise

    Teresa LaFromboise

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBicultural competence and resilience in ethnic minority adolescent development. Particularly, the influence of enculturation and acculturation experiences on adolescent development. Cultural considerations in individual, school and community-based psychological interventions with adolescents and emerging adults.

  • Victor R. Lee

    Victor R. Lee

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAI literacy, data literacy, quantified self, maker education, conceptual change in science, elementary computer science education

  • Christopher J. Lemons

    Christopher J. Lemons

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioChristopher J. Lemons, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Special Education in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. His research focuses on improving academic outcomes for children and adolescents with intellectual, developmental, and learning disabilities. His recent research has focused on developing and evaluating reading interventions for individuals with Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. His areas of expertise include reading interventions for children and adolescents with learning and intellectual disabilities, data-based individualization, and intervention-related assessment and professional development. Lemons has secured funding to support his research from the Institute of Education Sciences and the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, both within the U.S. Department of Education and from the National Institutes of Health. Lemons is a Senior Advisor of the National Center on Intensive Intervention and the Progress Center, both within American Institutes of Research (AIR) in Washington, DC. He also chairs the Executive Committee of the Pacific Coast Research Conference (PCRC) and serves as the President-Elect of the Council for Exceptional Children’s Division of Research Lemons is a recipient of the Pueschel-Tjossem Research Award from the National Down Syndrome Congress and the Distinguished Early Career Research Award from the Council for Exceptional Children’s Division for Research. In 2016, Lemons received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers, from President Obama. Prior to entering academia, Lemons taught in several special education settings including a preschool autism unit, an elementary resource and inclusion program, and a middle school life skills classroom.

  • Emily Jane Levine

    Emily Jane Levine

    Associate Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of History

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research topics include a genealogy of academic concepts; the contemporary consequences of Germany and America’s divergent paths in knowledge organization; Jews and private philanthropy for scholarship; the historical tension between knowledge-for-its-own sake and applied knowledge; the global transfer of the kindergarten, mass schooling, and higher education; and the history and future of institutional innovation.

  • Sarah Levine

    Sarah Levine

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioMy research focuses on the teaching and learning of literary interpretation and writing in under-resourced urban high schools, with an emphasis on the links between in- and out-of-school interpretive practices. I am also interested in ways that AI and digital media (for example, natural language processing models like ChatGPT; visual representations of text like word clouds; and radio production) can be used as frameworks for teaching reading and writing to middle and high school students. Before pursuing an academic career, I taught secondary English at a Chicago public school for ten years. While there, I founded and ran a youth radio program that used digital audio production as a tool to help make writing and analysis relevant and real-world for students, and to build bridges between in- and out-of-school worlds.

  • Guilherme Lichand

    Guilherme Lichand

    Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Education

    BioGuilherme is proudly Brazilian. His research focuses on the sources of educational inequities in the global South and on solutions with the potential to overturn them. He is co-director at the Stanford Lemann Center and a faculty affiliate at the Stanford King Center on Global Development and at the Stanford Center on Early Childhood. He holds a PhD in Political Economy and Government from Harvard University. He was previously the UNICEF Professor of Child Well-being and Development at the University of Zurich. Guilherme is also a co-founder of Brazilian EdTech Movva, a student success management system supporting vulnerable students graduate college. He was acknowledged by the Schwab Foundation as top-10 Brazilian social entrepreneur in 2020 (post-Covid legacy) and by MIT Technology Review as the top under-35 Brazilian innovator in 2014. His research has been published in numerous scientific journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and Nature Human Behavior, and campaigns featuring his work won multiple awards, including two lions at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

  • Ira Lit

    Ira Lit

    Professor (Teaching) of Education

    BioResearch and practice focuses on teacher education, elementary education, educational equity, and the design and purpose of education and schooling, as well as the exploration of the educational experience of students often marginalized by the school context.

  • Sihong Liu

    Sihong Liu

    Research Associate

    BioDr. Sihong Liu is a Social Science Research Scholar at Stanford Center on Early Childhood (SCEC) in the Graduate School of Education. Dr. Liu obtained her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Science at the University of Georgia in 2020, and a B.S. in Statistics from Renmin University of China in 2015. Her research focuses on investigating the developmental processes of risk and resilience among children and adolescents exposed to early life stress, with the ultimate goal of directly developing intervention programs and influencing social policies

    Dr. Liu adopts various research perspectives and methodologies in her research investigation. One particular research area of her work examines the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that connect early experiences to youth's behavioral outcomes, where she employs neuroimaging, electrocardiogram, and neuroendocrine stress response assessments to study the multi-level neurobiological processes. In line with the neurobiological focus, her recent work specifically examines how unpredictability in early experiences affect child socioemotional and cognitive development as well as the neural and stress response underpinnings of these effects.

    Currently, Dr. Liu is also actively involved in the ongoing RAPID project, a large national survey platform that uses frequent, brief, online surveys to assess essential needs from families and child care providers and provide actionable data to key stakeholders to inform policy and program decisions. As the methodologist of the RAPID project, Dr. Liu works with partners from local communities, advocacy groups, and academic institutions and leverages both quantitative and qualitative analytical strategies to transform parents' and child care providers voices into actionable practices.

  • Susanna Loeb

    Susanna Loeb

    Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioSusanna Loeb is a Professor at the Graduate School of Education. She was Director of the Annenberg Institute at Brown University, where she was also Professor of Education and of International and Public Affairs and the founder and executive director of the National Student Support Accelerator, which aims to expand access to relationship-based, high-impact tutoring in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Susanna’s research focuses broadly on education policy and its role in improving educational opportunities for students. Her work has addressed issues of educator career choices and professional development, of school finance and governance, and of early childhood systems. Before moving to Brown, Susanna was the Barnett Family Professor of Education at Stanford. She was the founding director of the Center for Education Policy at Stanford and co-director of Policy Analysis for California Education. Susanna led the research for both Getting Down to Facts projects for California schools. In 2020, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also an affiliate at NBER and JPAL and a member of the National Academy of Education.

  • Rachel Lotan

    Rachel Lotan

    Professor (Teaching) of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEquitable teaching and learning in heterogeneous classrooms; Teaching as a profession in international contexts, Curriculum development.

  • Prashant Loyalka

    Prashant Loyalka

    Associate Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrashant's research focuses on examining/addressing inequalities in the education of youth and on understanding/improving the quality of education received by youth in a number of countries including China, India, Russia, and the United States. In the course of addressing educational inequalities, Prashant examines the consequences of tracking, financial and informational constraints, as well as social and psychological factors in highly competitive education systems. His work on understanding educational quality is built around research that assesses and compares student learning in higher education, high school and compulsory schooling. He furthermore conducts large-scale evaluations of educational programs and policies that seek to improve student outcomes.

  • Ramon Martinez

    Ramon Martinez

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioRamón Antonio Martínez is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. His research explores the intersections of language, race, and ideology in K-12 public schools, with a particular focus on literacy learning among multilingual children and youth, and the preparation of teachers to work in multilingual settings. In addition to his long-term, community-engaged, and ethnographically informed research, Dr. Martínez actively supports pre-service teachers through his ongoing work in the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP). His scholarship has been published in journals such as Anthropology & Education Quarterly, International Multilingual Research Journal, Language Policy, Linguistics and Education, Modern Language Journal, Research in the Teaching of English, and Review of Research in Education. Dr. Martínez earned his Ph.D. from the Division of Urban Schooling in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  • Raymond McDermott

    Raymond McDermott

    Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInteraction analysis and social structure; the political economy of learning; writing systems; educational and psychological anthropology.

  • Daniel McFarland

    Daniel McFarland

    Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe majority of my current research projects concern the sociology of science and research innovation. Here are some examples of projects we are pursuing:
    1. the process of intellectual jurisdiction across fields and disciplines
    2. the process of knowledge innovation diffusion in science
    3. the propagators of scientific careers and advance
    4. the role of identity and diversity on the process of knowledge diffusion and career advance
    5. the process of research translation across scientific fields and into practice
    6. the formal properties and mechanisms of ideational change (network analysis, or holistic conceptions of scientific propositions and ideas)
    7. developing methods for identifying the rediscovery of old ideas recast anew
    8. investigating the process of scientific review

    I am also heavily involved in research on social networks and social network theory development. Some of my work concerns relational dynamics and cognitive networks as represented in communication. This often concerns the communication of children (in their writings and speech in classrooms) and academic scholars. I am also co-editing a special issue in Social Networks on "network ecology", and I am a coauthor on a social network methods textbook coming out with Cambridge Press (Forthcoming, by Craig Rawlings, Jeff Smith, James Moody and Daniel McFarland).

    Last, I am heavily involved in institutional efforts to develop computational social science, computational sociology, and education data science on Stanford's campus.

  • Milbrey McLaughlin

    Milbrey McLaughlin

    David Jacks Professor of Higher Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSchool context; planned change; teacher workplaces; government policy; inner-city youth; neighborhood-based organizations; community youth development.

  • Vinod Menon

    Vinod Menon

    Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Education and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEXPERIMENTAL, CLINICAL AND THEORETICAL SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

    Cognitive neuroscience; Systems neuroscience; Cognitive development; Psychiatric neuroscience; Functional brain imaging; Dynamical basis of brain function; Nonlinear dynamics of neural systems.

  • John Mitchell

    John Mitchell

    Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProgramming languages, computer security and privacy, blockchain, machine learning, and technology for education

  • Sergio Monsalve

    Sergio Monsalve

    Lecturer

    BioSergio Monsalve is a venture capital investor focus on early stage investments in the future of learnIng and work. Sergio is also visiting professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education. In both roles, he is focused on the “Future of Work and Learning” and on developing technology innovations and entrepreneurship in education. Sergio is on the board and an investor of various companies in this area of focus, including Udemy ($2B), Adaptive Insights (Sold to Workday for $1.6B), Clerio Vision, Alma Campus, and Kahoot!

    Sergio has also held various entrepreneurship and leadership roles in high-growth technology companies like eBay, Paypal, Portal Software (IPO during tenure), as well operating roles in various venture-backed startups he helped get off the ground as a founder or founding executive. Sergio is originally from Mexico, and is an active advocate and spokesperson for the increased participation of underrepresented communities in the technology industries, especially LatinX. Sergio is also a Board of Trustee at Harvey Mudd College, where he serves as Vice-Chair of the Board Affairs committee. Sergio holds a bachelor of science in management science and engineering from Stanford University, and a masters of business administration from Harvard.

  • Jelena Obradović

    Jelena Obradović

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdaptation, resilience, and developmental psychopathology of disadvantaged children populations; Stress reactivity and biological sensitivity to contextual influences; Executive function and self-regulatory abilities; Effects of risk, adversity, and social status on children’s development.

  • Jonathan Osborne

    Jonathan Osborne

    Kamalachari Professor of Science Education, Emeritus

    BioMy research focus is a mix of work on policy and pedagogy in the teaching and learning of science. In the policy domain, I am interested in exploring students' attitudes to science and how school science can be made more worthwhile and engaging - particularly for those who will not continue with the study of science. In pedagogy, my focus has been on making the case for the role of argumentation in science education both as a means of improving the use of a more dialogic approach to teaching science and improving student understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. I have worked on four major projects in argumentation. The first from 1999-2002 was on 'Enhancing the Quality of Argument in School Science Education'. From this we developed the IDEAS (Ideas, Evidence and Argument in Science Education) materials to support teacher professional learning funded by the Nuffield Foundation. From 2007-2010 I was co-PI on the project 'Learning to Teach Ideas, Evidence and Argument in School Science' which explored how to build teachers competency with the use of this pedagogy in four schools. Most recently, I have worked with Mark Wilson of UCB on a project to develop and test a learning progression for Argumentation in science. Some of this work can be found on the website:

    http://scientificargumentation.stanford.edu/

    My other area of interest in pedagogy is the teaching of reading and the facilitation of discussion. I have published a book entitled 'Language and Literacy in Science Education' and we are just completing a five year IES funded project - 'Catalyzing Comprehension through Discussion and Debate' exploring how we can support the teaching of reading in science. We have developed a web site with some of our materials:

    http://serpmedia.org/rtl/

    And a MOOC called 'Reading to Learn in Science" which is offered by NovoEd and will be run again from Jan 13, 2016 for 12 weeks.

    Finally, much science, if not more, is learned outside the classroom and how young people learn in that environment and what it has to offer formal education is another focus of my work and I was one of the partners in the NSF funded Centre for Informal Learning and Schools (2002-7) and have several publications in this field.

  • Brad Osgood

    Brad Osgood

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, in Education
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioOsgood is a mathematician by training and applies techniques from analysis and geometry to various engineering problems. He is interested in problems in imaging, pattern recognition, and signal processing.

  • Amado Padilla

    Amado Padilla

    Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include: (a) the development of models of ethnic identity that incorporate social cognition theory and social identity; (b)acculturation stress and mental health status across three generations of Latinos; (c) home, school and community protective factors that empower Latino students to succeed academically; (d) learning of Mandarin by high school students in summer intensive programs vs. students in regular high school world language classes; and (e) student language and academic content learning in a Mandarin/English dual language immersion program.

  • Eujin Park

    Eujin Park

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioDr. Park is an Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Dr. Park draws upon Critical Race Theory, Asian American Studies, and community engaged research to examine how Asian American families negotiate with race in and through educational institutions. She recently conducted an ethnographic investigation of community-based educational spaces in the Chicago-area Asian American community, which highlighted the role of community spaces in youths’ educational experiences and understandings of racializing discourses. In addition to publishing and presenting her work in multiple academic venues, Dr. Park draws upon her research in her work with Asian American and other youth of color in community-based organizations. She earned her Ph.D. in Educational Policy Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a concentration in Social Sciences and a Minor in Qualitative Methods. She also holds an M.A. from UW-Madison and a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Prior to joining the faculty, Dr. Park was an IDEAL Provostial Fellow, part of the inaugural cohort of early-career scholars of race and ethnicity at Stanford University. Prior to that, she was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy (IRRPP) at the University of Illinois-Chicago.

  • Roy Pea

    Roy Pea

    Director, H-STAR, David Jacks Professor of Education and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestslearning sciences focus on advancing theories, research, tools and social practices of technology-enhanced learning of complex domains

  • Francis Pearman

    Francis Pearman

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioFrancis A. Pearman is an Assistant Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. His research focuses on how poverty and inequality shape the life chances of children, especially in rapidly changing cities. Pearman holds a Ph.D. and M.Ed. from Vanderbilt University and a B.S. from the University of Virginia.

  • David Plank

    David Plank

    Professor (Research) of Education, Emeritus

    BioDavid Plank is Co-Director of the Lemann Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Brazilian Education. He served as Executive Director of Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE) for 11 years, retiring in 2018. Before joining PACE Plank was a Professor at Michigan State University, where he founded and directed the Education Policy Center. He was previously on the faculties at the University of Pittsburgh and at the University of Texas at Dallas, where he taught courses and conducted research in the areas of educational finance and policy. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1983. Plank is the author or editor of six books, including the AERA Handbook of Education Policy Research. He has published widely in a number of different fields, including economics of education, history of education, and educational policy. His current interests include the role of the State in education, and the relationship between academic research and public policy. In addition to his work in the United States, Plank has served as a consultant to international organizations including the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the United States Agency for International Development, the Ford Foundation, and also to governments in Africa and Latin America.

  • Denise Pope

    Denise Pope

    Senior Lecturer in Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Pope is co-founder of Challenge Success, a research and intervention project that aims to reduce unhealthy pressure on youth and champions a broader vision of youth success. Challenge Success is an expanded version of the SOS: Stressed-Out Students project that Dr. Pope founded and directed from 2003-2008. She lectures nationally on parenting techniques and pedagogical strategies to increase student well-being, engagement with learning, and integrity.

  • Ann Porteus

    Ann Porteus

    Senior Lecturer in Education

    BioNo research activity. Interests in interpersonal/group dynamics, team building, leadership development, and multicultural education.

  • Walter W. Powell

    Walter W. Powell

    Jacks Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Communication, of Sociology and of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlease go to my webpage for more info on research:
    https://woodypowell.com

  • Francisco Ramirez

    Francisco Ramirez

    Vida Jacks Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlobalization and impact of human rights regime;rise of human rights education and analysis of civics, history, and social studies textbooks; transformations in the status of women in society and in higher education; universities as institutions and organizations;education, science and development

  • sean reardon

    sean reardon

    Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology
    On Leave from 01/01/2024 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe causes and patterns of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic achievement disparities;

    The effects of school integration policies on segregation patterns and educational outcomes;

    Income inequality and its educational and social consequences.

    http://cepa.stanford.edu/sean-reardon

  • Byron Reeves

    Byron Reeves

    Paul C. Edwards Professor of Communication, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioByron Reeves, PhD, is the Paul C. Edwards Professor of Communication at Stanford and
    Professor (by courtesy) in the Stanford School of Education. Byron has a long history of
    experimental research on the psychological processing of media, and resulting responses and
    effects. He has studied how media influence attention, memory and emotional responses and has
    applied the research in the areas of speech dialogue systems, interactive games, advanced
    displays, social robots, and autonomous cars. Byron has recently launched (with Stanford
    colleagues Nilam Ram and Thomas Robinson) the Human Screenome Project (Nature, 2020),
    designed to collect moment-by-moment changes in technology use across applications, platforms
    and screens.

    At Stanford, Byron has been Director of the Center for the Study of Language and Information,
    and Co-Director of the H-STAR Institute (Human Sciences and Technologies Advanced
    Research), and he was the founding Director of mediaX at Stanford, a university-industry
    program launched in 2001 to facilitate discussion and research at the intersection of academic
    and applied interests. Byron has worked at Microsoft Research and with several technology
    startups, and has been involved with media policy at the FTC, FCC, US Congress and White
    House. He is an elected Fellow of the International Communication Association, and recipient of ICA Fellows book award for The Media Equation (with Prof. Clifford Nass), and the Novim Foundation Epiphany Science and Society Award. Byron’s PhD in Communication is from Michigan State University.

  • Rob Reich

    Rob Reich

    McGregor-Girand Professor of Social Ethics of Science and Technology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI, Professor, by courtesy, of Education, of Philosophy and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at FSI
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioRob Reich is professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy and at the Graduate School of Education. He is a co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (publisher of the Stanford Social Innovation Review), and associate director of the Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. He was faculty director at the Center for Ethics in Society for eight years, and he continues to lead its ethics and technology initiatives.

    His scholarship in political theory engages with the work of social scientists and engineers. His newest work is on ethics and AI. His most recent books are System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot (with Mehran Sahami and Jeremy M. Weinstein, HarperCollins 2021) and Digital Technology and Democratic Theory (edited with Lucy Bernholz and Hélène Landemore, University of Chicago Press 2021). He has also written widely about philanthropy, including Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better (Princeton University Press, 2018) and Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values (edited with Chiara Cordelli and Lucy Bernholz, University of Chicago Press, 2016). His early work is focused on democracy and education, including Bridging Liberalism and Multiculturalism in American Education (University of Chicago Press, 2002) and Education, Justice, and Democracy (edited with Danielle Allen, University of Chicago Press, 2013). He has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, Wired, The Guardian, and the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

    Rob is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores award, Stanford’s highest honor for teaching. He was a sixth grade teacher at Rusk Elementary School in Houston, Texas before attending graduate school. He is a board member of the magazine Boston Review, of Giving Tuesday, and at the Spencer Foundation.

  • Jonathan Rosa

    Jonathan Rosa

    Associate Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Linguistics, of Anthropology and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am currently working on two book projects through which I am continuing to develop insights into ethnoracial, linguistic, and educational formations. The first offers frameworks for understanding ethnoracial contradictions across distinctive societal contexts by interweaving ethnographic analysis of diasporic Puerto Rican experiences and broader constructions of Latinidad that illustrate race and ethnicity as colonial and communicative predicaments. The second spotlights decolonial approaches to the creation of collective well-being through educational and societal transformations based on longstanding community collaborations in Chicago.

  • Maria Ruiz-Primo

    Maria Ruiz-Primo

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioMaria Araceli Ruiz-Primo is an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Education, Stanford University. Her work, funded mainly by the National Science Foundation and the Institute of Education Sciences, examines assessment practices and the assessment of student learning both in the classroom and in large-scale assessment programs. Her publications address the development and evaluation of multiple learning assessment strategies, including concept maps and students’ science notebooks, and the study of teachers’ informal and formal formative assessment practices, such as the use of assessment conversations and embedded assessments. She also has conducted research on the development and evaluation of assessments that are instructionally sensitive and instruments intended to measure teachers’ formative assessment practices. Recently she has worked on the analysis of state testing programs. She was co-editor of a special issue on assessment in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and a special issue on classroom assessment in the Journal of Educational Measurement. She has published in Science, Educational Measurement: Issues and Practices, the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, and other major technical educational research journals.

  • Farzana Tabitha Saleem

    Farzana Tabitha Saleem

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioDr. Saleem is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. She earned her PhD in Clinical-Community Psychology from the George Washington University and completed an APA accredited internship, with a specialization in trauma, at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Dr. Saleem’s research examines the influence of racial stressors and culturally relevant practices on the psychological health, academic success, and well-being of Black adolescents and other youth of color. Dr. Saleem uses a strengths-focused and community-based lens in her research to study contextual nuance in the process and benefits of ethnic-racial socialization. She also explores factors in the family, school, and community contexts that can help youth manage the consequences of racial stress and trauma. Her current studies examine the utilization and benefits of ethnic-racial socialization across the school ecology. Dr. Saleem uses her research in each of these areas to inform the development and adaptation of programs and school-based interventions focused on managing racial stressors, eradicating mental health and academic racial disparities, and promoting resilience among historically marginalized and racially diverse children and adolescents. Dr. Saleem is a visiting scholar to the American Psychological Association RESilience Initiative and serves in other positions focused on inclusion, equity and social justice. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Saleem was a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow and a University of California Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California Los Angeles in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies and the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, with affiliation in the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies.

  • Shima Salehi

    Shima Salehi

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Education

    BioShima Salehi is a Research Assistant Professor at Stanford Graduate School of Education, and the director of IDEAL research lab, the research component of Stanford IDEAL initiative to promote inclusivity, diversity, equity and access in learning communities. Her research focuses on how to use different instructional practices to teach science and engineering more effectively and inclusively. For effective science and engineering education, Dr. Salehi has studied effective scientific problem-solving and developed empirical framework for main problem-solving practices to train students in. Based on these findings, she has designed instructional activities to provide students with explicit opportunities to learn these problem-solving practices. These activities have been implemented in different science and engineering courses. For Inclusive science and engineering, she examines different barriers for equity in STEM education and through what instructional and/or institutional changes they can be addressed. Her recent works focus on what are the underlying mechanisms for demographic performance gaps in STEM college education, and what instructional practices better serve students from different demographic backgrounds. Salehi holds a PhD in Learning Sciences and a PhD minor in Psychology from Stanford University, and received a B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Iran. She is the founder of KhanAcademyFarsi, a non-profit educational organization which has provided service to Farsi-speaking students, particularly in under-privileged areas.